Special Issue "Electronic Devices for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Henrique Leonel Gomes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, Faro, 8005-139, Portugal
Tel. +351-289-800-900 (ext:7763)
Interests: organic bioelectronics; electrical characterization; resistive switching
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bioelectronics comprise the development and study of electronic devices that operate as transducers between the signals and functions of biology, and those of conventional electronic processing systems. Bioelectronic devices can be used to regulate the physiology of cells, tissues, and organs in a chemically-specific manner. In addition, they can also be applied to living systems to selectively sense, record, and monitor different signals and physiological states, as well as convert relevant parameters into electronic readout for further processing and decision making.

A Special Issue of the journal of Micromachines will be dedicated to highlight the field of bioelectronic devices. In this Special Issue, we seek to explore emergent electronic, optoelectronic, and mechanical devices that can couple to biology more efficiently. These devices will be used to develop the next-generation of biointerfaces for fundamental studies in biology and for wearable and implantable medical devices.

Prospective authors are invited to submit research contributions representing original and previously unpublished work. High quality critical reviews will be also considered for publication. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • In vivo integration of soft, flexible and biodegradable electronics for medical implants
  • Devices designed to analyse the status of living cells
  • Integration of biological materials in micro/nano devices
  • Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) for biomedical applications
  • Point of care test devices for health monitoring
  • Devices and energy harvesting solutions for wearable technologies

Authors should follow the Micromachines manuscript format, as described in the Information for Authors.

Prof. Henrique Leonel Gomes
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioelectronic devices
  • Bio-interfaces
  • Implantable electronics
  • Wearable biomedical devices

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
Design of a Dual-Technology Fusion Sensor Chip with a Ring Electrode for Biosensing Application
Micromachines 2019, 10(2), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10020153 - 23 Feb 2019
Abstract
Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is still a new high-precision surface detection technique. However, the adsorption quality detected by the QCM currently contains a solvent-coupling quality and cannot separate the actual biomolecular mass. Local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can detect the mass of biomolecules, [...] Read more.
Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) is still a new high-precision surface detection technique. However, the adsorption quality detected by the QCM currently contains a solvent-coupling quality and cannot separate the actual biomolecular mass. Local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can detect the mass of biomolecules, but requires a certain contrast between the solvent of the surrounding medium and the refractive index of the adsorbed layer. The sensor chip, combining two compatible technologies, can realize the simultaneous detection of biomolecules and improve the refractive index sensitivity. The structure of our chip is to prepare the ring-shaped gold electrode on the upper surface of the quartz crystal, the circular gold electrode on the bottom surface, and the spherical gold nanoparticles arrays in the center region of the ring electrode to form a QCM/LSPR dual-technology chip. Through simulation, we finally get the size of the best energy trap by the two electrodes on the upper surface and the lower surface: the ring-top electrode with a thickness of 100 nm, an inner diameter of 4 mm, and an outer diameter of 8 mm; and the bottom electrode with a thickness of 100 nm and a radius of 6 mm. By comparing the refractive index sensitivity, we chose a spherical gold nanoparticle with a radius of 30 nm and a refractive sensitivity of 61.34 nm/RIU to design the LSPR sensor chip. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronic Devices for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessOpinion
From Lab on a Chip to Point of Care Devices: The Role of Open Source Microcontrollers
Micromachines 2018, 9(8), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9080403 - 14 Aug 2018
Cited by 13
Abstract
Microcontrollers are programmable, integrated circuit chips. In the last two decades, their applications to industrial instruments, vehicles, and household appliances have reached the extent that microcontrollers are now the number-one selling electronic chip of all kinds. Simultaneously, the field of lab-on-a-chip research and [...] Read more.
Microcontrollers are programmable, integrated circuit chips. In the last two decades, their applications to industrial instruments, vehicles, and household appliances have reached the extent that microcontrollers are now the number-one selling electronic chip of all kinds. Simultaneously, the field of lab-on-a-chip research and technology has seen major technological leaps towards sample handling, sample preparation, and sensing for use in molecular diagnostic devices. Yet, the transformation from a laboratory based lab-on-a-chip technology to actual point-of-care device products has largely been limited to a fraction of the foreseen potential. We believe that increased knowledge of the vast possibilities that becomes available with open source microcontrollers, especially when embedded in easy-to-use development environments, such as the Arduino or Raspberry Pi, could potentially solve and even bridge the gap between lab-on-a-chip technology and real-life point of care applications. The profuse availability and extraordinary capabilities of microcontrollers, namely within computation, communication, and networking, combined with easy-to-use development environments, as well as a very active and fast moving community of makers, who are eager to share their knowledge, could potentially be the difference between a dreadful “chip-in-a-lab”-situation, and the next successful start-up. Here follows a brief insight into how open source microcontrollers could potentially have a transformative effect on the field of lab-on-a-chip research and technology. Details in some specific areas of application are briefly treated before addressing challenges and future perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electronic Devices for Biomedical Applications)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop