Special Issue "Bioprinting and 3D Printing in MEMS Technology"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Chee Kai Chua
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, N3.1-B2c-03b, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798
Interests: geometric modelling; rapid prototyping; additive manufacturing; 3D printing; reverse engineering; biomedical engineering design; tissue engineering; biomaterials; bioprinting
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Wai Yee Yeong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore City, Singapore
Interests: Additive manufacturing; 3D Printing; 3D Bioprinting
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Jia An
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, N3.1-B2c-03b, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798
Interests: 3D printing; bioprinting; biomaterials; polymer processing; polymer microfibers; polymer membranes; tissue engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

3D printing, formally known as additive manufacturing, has advanced significantly in printing resolutions in recent years. The printed structures can contain complex features, as small as a few hundred nanometres. This advancement in resolution enables the fabrication of intricate micro and nanostructures, which are useful for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. In addition, owing to the merits of single step fabrication, 3D printing can save on materials and time compared to conventional MEMS fabrication. On the other hand, the advancement in MEMS technology has led to new control devices or sensors, which can be useful for depositing materials, controlling printing process or advancing the measurement sciences in 3D printing. These reciprocal beneficial developments in 3D printing and MEMS motivated this Special Issue. Furthermore, existing MEMS designed for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications are highly transferrable to a new emerging field of 3D printing–3D bioprinting. Therefore, the title of this Special Issue is “Bioprinting and 3D printing in MEMS Technology”.

The focus of this Special Issue is the interaction between 3D printing/bioprinting and MEMS technology. Any topics involving 3D printing /bioprinting and MEMS will be of interest to us. Please refer to below a list of suggested keywords for the scope of this Special Issue. We welcome all in both fields to submit to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Chee Kai Chua
Dr. Wai Yee Yeong
Dr. Jia An
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bio-MEMS/NEMS
  • lab on chip
  • biosensors
  • bioprinting
  • tissue engineering
  • drug delivery
  • biosystems
  • microfluidics
  • microelectronics
  • nanocomposites and nanomaterials
  • micro/nanostructure
  • energy applications, such as 3D printed micro batteries
  • piezoelectrics for inkjet printers
  • MEMS/NEMS for micro 3D printing
  • measurement sciences via MEMS
  • printed membrane technology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
3D Printing and Bioprinting in MEMS Technology
Micromachines 2017, 8(7), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8070229 - 21 Jul 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
3D printing and bioprinting have advanced significantly in printing resolution in recent years, which presents a great potential for fabricating small and complex features suitable for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with new functionalities. This special issue aims to give a glimpse into the future [...] Read more.
3D printing and bioprinting have advanced significantly in printing resolution in recent years, which presents a great potential for fabricating small and complex features suitable for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with new functionalities. This special issue aims to give a glimpse into the future of this research field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioprinting and 3D Printing in MEMS Technology)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Ink-Jet Printing of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)
Micromachines 2017, 8(6), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8060194 - 21 Jun 2017
Cited by 17
Abstract
Beyond printing text on paper, inkjet printing methods have recently been applied to print passive electrical and optical microparts, such as conductors, resistors, solder bumps and polymeric micro lenses. They are also useful to print micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) as sub-millimeter sensor and actuator [...] Read more.
Beyond printing text on paper, inkjet printing methods have recently been applied to print passive electrical and optical microparts, such as conductors, resistors, solder bumps and polymeric micro lenses. They are also useful to print micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) as sub-millimeter sensor and actuator arrays, such as multifunctional skins applicable to robotic application and ambient monitoring. This paper presents the latest review of a few successful cases of printable MEMS devices. This review shows that inkjet printing is good for printing two-dimensional or surface MEMS devices from a small unit to an array over a large area. In the future, three-dimensional printing of multi-materials, from metal, plastic, to ceramic, will open the possibility of realizing more variety and function of a large-areal MEMS array, for a mobile electro-mechanical systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioprinting and 3D Printing in MEMS Technology)
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Open AccessArticle
3D Cardiac Cell Culture on Nanofiber Bundle Substrates for the Investigation of Cell Morphology and Contraction
Micromachines 2017, 8(5), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8050147 - 05 May 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cardiac failure is a quite severe condition that can result in life-threatening consequences. Cardiac tissue engineering is thought to be one of the most promising technologies to reconstruct damaged cardiac muscles and facilitate myocardial tissue regeneration. We report a new nanofiber bundle substrate [...] Read more.
Cardiac failure is a quite severe condition that can result in life-threatening consequences. Cardiac tissue engineering is thought to be one of the most promising technologies to reconstruct damaged cardiac muscles and facilitate myocardial tissue regeneration. We report a new nanofiber bundle substrate for three-dimensional (3D) cardiac cell culture as a platform to investigate cell morphology and contraction. Polymeric nanofiber bundles with various patterns act as physical cues to align the cardiac cell sheets. Comparing the uniaxial alignment with the randomly distributed pattern, we found that the bundles with the former pattern have more “grooves” for the settlement of cardiomyocytes in a 3D structure than the latter. The cardiomyocytes loaded on the aligned nanofiber bundles tend to grow along the fiber axis. The interfacial structure between a single cardiomyocyte in the cardiac cell sheet and the attached nanofibers was observed using environmental scanning electron microscope. Immunofluorescence imaging showed that the uniaxially aligned nanofibers greatly promoted cell attachment and alignment of the cardiomyocytes because of the matching morphology between the nanofiber pattern and the biological components. Moreover, we concluded that the aligned polymeric nanofibers could be a promising substrate suitable for the anisotropic contraction of cardiac cell sheets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioprinting and 3D Printing in MEMS Technology)
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Open AccessArticle
Preparing of Interdigitated Microelectrode Arrays for AC Electrokinetic Devices Using Inkjet Printing of Silver Nanoparticles Ink
Micromachines 2017, 8(4), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8040106 - 01 Apr 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
The surge in popularity of lab-on-chip applications has set a new challenge for the fabrication of prototyping devices, such as electrokinetic devices. In such devices, a micro-electrode is the key component. Currently, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processes such as lift-off and etching techniques are [...] Read more.
The surge in popularity of lab-on-chip applications has set a new challenge for the fabrication of prototyping devices, such as electrokinetic devices. In such devices, a micro-electrode is the key component. Currently, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processes such as lift-off and etching techniques are employed to prepare the micro-sized conductive patterns. These processes are time-consuming, require a material removal step, clean-room facilities, and the utilisation of harmful chemicals. On the other hand, rapid fabrication is required by researchers designing such devices to test their functionality. Additive manufacturing technology such as the inkjet printing of conductive material is one potential solution to achieve that objective. In this study, we report the utilisation of inkjet printing for the rapid prototyping of alternating current (AC) electrokinetic devices on a rigid glass substrate. The non-lithographical and vacuum-free process for the fabrication of a microfluidic device was demonstrated. The smallest feature size of 60 μm was successfully printed. The crystalline structure of the printed material under different curing temperatures was characterised. It was found that these treatment conditions affect electrical conductivity. Although a low-temperature sintering process was applied, low resistivity was obtained. An AC electrokinetics device for the manipulation of microparticles has been prepared to illustrate such printed silver micro-patterns. The results strongly support the idea that inkjet printing is a powerful and cost-effective prototyping tool for researchers who work with electrokinetic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioprinting and 3D Printing in MEMS Technology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Emerging Frontiers and Applications of High-Resolution 3D Printing
Micromachines 2017, 8(4), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi8040113 - 01 Apr 2017
Cited by 39
Abstract
Over the past few decades, there has been an increasing interest in the fabrication of complex high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) architectures at micro/nanoscale. These architectures can be obtained through conventional microfabrication methods including photolithography, electron-beam lithography, femtosecond laser lithography, nanoimprint lithography, etc. However, the [...] Read more.
Over the past few decades, there has been an increasing interest in the fabrication of complex high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) architectures at micro/nanoscale. These architectures can be obtained through conventional microfabrication methods including photolithography, electron-beam lithography, femtosecond laser lithography, nanoimprint lithography, etc. However, the applications of these fabrication methods are limited by their high costs, the generation of various chemical wastes, and their insufficient ability to create high-aspect-ratio 3D structures. High-resolution 3D printing has recently emerged as a promising solution, as it is capable of building multifunctional 3D constructs with optimal properties. Here we present a review on the principles and the recent advances of high-resolution 3D printing techniques, including two-photon polymerization (TPP), projection microstereoLithography (PµSL), direct ink writing (DIW) and electrohydrodynamic printing (EHDP). We also highlight their typical applications in various fields such as metamaterials, energy storage, flexible electronics, microscale tissue engineering scaffolds and organ-on-chips. Finally, we discuss the challenge and perspective of these high-resolution 3D printing techniques in technical and application aspects. We believe that high-resolution 3D printing will eventually revolutionize the microfabrication processes of 3D architectures with high product quality and diversified materials. It will also find applications in a wide scope. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioprinting and 3D Printing in MEMS Technology)
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