MEMS for Ultrasound

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 22947

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Ophthalmology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA
Interests: MEMS; biomedical imaging; photoacoustic imaging; ultrasound; elastography
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail
Guest Editor
Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: MEMS; microfluidics; lab-on-a-chip; transducers

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Information and Electronics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: MEMS; CMOS-MEMS sensors; micromirrors; microactuators; piezoelectric MEMS microspeakers; pMUTs; photoacoustic microscopy; optical endomicroscopy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology has demonstrated enormous potential in constructing micro transducers and micro sensors with outstanding performance due to its advantages of, for instance, miniaturization, high speed, high resolution, high temperature reliability, and convenience of batch fabrication. MEMS Ultrasound devices have been found to be useful in a diverse range of applications such as medical, microscopy, inkjet printing, non-destructive structure testing, fluid/particle manipulation, wireless power transfer, and other harsh conditions where conventional ultrasound transducers tend to fail. The materials, designs, modeling, structures, fabrication, integration, reliability, and applications of MEMS for ultrasound involve multiple disciplines, demanding researchers with diverse backgrounds to investigate. In this Special Issue, the current state of this exciting research field will be presented, covering a wide range of topics, including but not limited to:

  • Ultrasound MEMS transducers: modeling, design, fabrication, or applications;
  • Ultrasound MEMS sensors;
  • Ultrasound actuators and micromotors;
  • New materials for MEMS ultrasound devices;
  • CMUTs;
  • pMUTs;
  • Ultrasonic fingerprint sensors;
  • Micro ultrasound and photoacoustic devices for imaging;
  • MEMS devices for ultrasound detection;
  • MEMS ultrasound wireless transfer;
  • Ultrasound MEMS for telecommunications;
  • 3D print transducers;
  • Acoustofluidics;
  • Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials in ultrasound wavelength;
  • Applications of ultrasound MEMS.

Prof. Dr. Qifa Zhou
Prof. Dr. Huikai Xie
Prof. Dr. Yi Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Ultrasound MEMS transducers: modeling, design, fabrication, or applications
  • Ultrasound MEMS sensors
  • Ultrasound actuators and micromotors
  • New materials for MEMS ultrasound devices
  • CMUTs
  • pMUTs
  • Ultrasonic fingerprint sensors
  • Micro ultrasound and photoacoustic devices for imaging
  • MEMS devices for ultrasound detection
  • MEMS ultrasound wireless transfer
  • Ultrasound MEMS for telecommunications
  • 3D print transducers
  • Acoustofluidics
  • Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials in ultrasound wavelength
  • Applications of ultrasound MEMS

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

16 pages, 54577 KiB  
Article
In Vivo Assessment of Hypoxia Levels in Pancreatic Tumors Using a Dual-Modality Ultrasound/Photoacoustic Imaging System
by Yuhling Wang, De-Fu Jhang, Chia-Hua Tsai, Nai-Jung Chiang, Chia-Hui Tsao, Chiung-Cheng Chuang, Li-Tzong Chen, Wun-Shaing Wayne Chang and Lun-De Liao
Micromachines 2021, 12(6), 668; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12060668 - 7 Jun 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3676
Abstract
Noninvasive anatomical and functional imaging has become an essential tool to evaluate tissue oxygen saturation dynamics in preclinical or clinical studies of hypoxia. Our dual-wavelength technique for photoacoustic (PA) imaging based on the differential absorbance spectrum of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) can [...] Read more.
Noninvasive anatomical and functional imaging has become an essential tool to evaluate tissue oxygen saturation dynamics in preclinical or clinical studies of hypoxia. Our dual-wavelength technique for photoacoustic (PA) imaging based on the differential absorbance spectrum of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) can quantify tissue oxygen saturation using the intrinsic contrast property. PA imaging of tissue oxygen saturation can be used to monitor tumor-related hypoxia, which is a particularly relevant functional parameter of the tumor microenvironment that has a strong influence on tumor aggressiveness. The simultaneous acquisition of anatomical and functional information using dual-modality ultrasound (US) and PA imaging technology enhances the preclinical applicability of the method. Here, the developed dual-modality US/PA system was used to measure relative tissue oxygenation using the dual-wavelength technique. Tissue oxygen saturation was quantified in a pancreatic tumor mouse model. The differences in tissue oxygenation were detected by comparing pancreatic samples from normal and tumor-bearing mice at various time points after implantation. The use of an in vivo pancreatic tumor model revealed changes in hypoxia at various stages of tumor growth. The US/PA imaging data positively correlated with the results of immunohistochemical staining for hypoxia. Thus, our dual-modality US/PA imaging system can be used to reliably assess and monitor hypoxia in pancreatic tumor mouse models. These findings enable the use of a combination of US and PA imaging to acquire anatomical and functional information on tumor growth and to evaluate treatment responses in longitudinal preclinical studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MEMS for Ultrasound)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 2869 KiB  
Article
Investigation of Cylindrical Piezoelectric and Specific Multi-Channel Circular MEMS-Transducer Array Resonator of Ultrasonic Ablation
by Jian-Chiun Liou, Chih-Wei Peng and Zhen-Xi Chen
Micromachines 2021, 12(4), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi12040371 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2496
Abstract
Background: A cylindrical piezoelectric element and a specific multi-channel circular microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-transducer array of ultrasonic system were used for ultrasonic energy generation and ablation. A relatively long time is required for the heat to be conducted to the target position. Ultrasound thermal [...] Read more.
Background: A cylindrical piezoelectric element and a specific multi-channel circular microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-transducer array of ultrasonic system were used for ultrasonic energy generation and ablation. A relatively long time is required for the heat to be conducted to the target position. Ultrasound thermal therapy has great potential for treating deep hyperplastic tissues and tumors, such as breast cancer and liver tumors. Methods: Ultrasound ablation technology produces thermal energy by heating the surface of a target, and the heat gradually penetrates to the target’s interior. Beamforming was performed to observe energy distribution. A resonance method was used to generate ablation energy for verification. Energy was generated according to the coordinates of geometric graph positions to reach the ablation temperature. Results: The mean resonance frequency of Channels 1–8 was 2.5 MHz, and the cylindrical piezoelectric ultrasonic element of Channel A was 4.2546 Ω at 5.7946 MHz. High-intensity ultrasound has gradually been applied in clinical treatment. Widely adopted, ultrasonic hyperthermia involves the use of high-intensity ultrasound to heat tissues at 42–45 °C for 30–60 min. Conclusion: In the ultrasonic energy method, when the target position reaches a temperature that significantly reduces the cell viability (46.9 °C), protein surface modification occurs on the surface of the target. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MEMS for Ultrasound)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 3859 KiB  
Article
3D-Printing Piezoelectric Composite with Honeycomb Structure for Ultrasonic Devices
by Yushun Zeng, Laiming Jiang, Yizhe Sun, Yang Yang, Yi Quan, Shuang Wei, Gengxi Lu, Runze Li, Jiahui Rong, Yong Chen and Qifa Zhou
Micromachines 2020, 11(8), 713; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11080713 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 52 | Viewed by 6432
Abstract
Piezoelectric composites are considered excellent core materials for fabricating various ultrasonic devices. For the traditional fabrication process, piezoelectric composite structures are mainly prepared by mold forming, mixing, and dicing-filing techniques. However, these techniques are limited on fabricating shapes with complex structures. With the [...] Read more.
Piezoelectric composites are considered excellent core materials for fabricating various ultrasonic devices. For the traditional fabrication process, piezoelectric composite structures are mainly prepared by mold forming, mixing, and dicing-filing techniques. However, these techniques are limited on fabricating shapes with complex structures. With the rapid development of additive manufacturing (AM), many research fields have applied AM technology to produce functional materials with various geometric shapes. In this study, the Mask-Image-Projection-based Stereolithography (MIP-SL) process, one of the AM (3D-printing) methods, was used to build BaTiO3-based piezoelectric composite ceramics with honeycomb structure design. A sintered sample with denser body and higher density was achieved (i.e., density obtained 5.96 g/cm3), and the 3D-printed ceramic displayed the expected piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties using the complex structure (i.e., piezoelectric constant achieved 60 pC/N). After being integrated into an ultrasonic device, the 3D-printed component also presents promising material performance and output power properties for ultrasound sensing (i.e., output voltage reached 180 mVpp). Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of AM technology in fabricating piezoelectric composites with complex structures that cannot be fabricated by dicing-filling. The approach may bring more possibilities to the fabrication of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS)-based ultrasonic devices via 3D-printing methods in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MEMS for Ultrasound)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

42 pages, 14997 KiB  
Review
MEMS Ultrasound Transducers for Endoscopic Photoacoustic Imaging Applications
by Haoran Wang, Yifei Ma, Hao Yang, Huabei Jiang, Yingtao Ding and Huikai Xie
Micromachines 2020, 11(10), 928; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11100928 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 9250
Abstract
Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is drawing extensive attention and gaining rapid development as an emerging biomedical imaging technology because of its high spatial resolution, large imaging depth, and rich optical contrast. PAI has great potential applications in endoscopy, but the progress of endoscopic PAI [...] Read more.
Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is drawing extensive attention and gaining rapid development as an emerging biomedical imaging technology because of its high spatial resolution, large imaging depth, and rich optical contrast. PAI has great potential applications in endoscopy, but the progress of endoscopic PAI was hindered by the challenges of manufacturing and assembling miniature imaging components. Over the last decade, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology has greatly facilitated the development of photoacoustic endoscopes and extended the realm of applicability of the PAI. As the key component of photoacoustic endoscopes, micromachined ultrasound transducers (MUTs), including piezoelectric MUTs (pMUTs) and capacitive MUTs (cMUTs), have been developed and explored for endoscopic PAI applications. In this article, the recent progress of pMUTs (thickness extension mode and flexural vibration mode) and cMUTs are reviewed and discussed with their applications in endoscopic PAI. Current PAI endoscopes based on pMUTs and cMUTs are also introduced and compared. Finally, the remaining challenges and future directions of MEMS ultrasound transducers for endoscopic PAI applications are given. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MEMS for Ultrasound)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop