Advances in 3D Bioprinting for Tissue Engineering

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B:Biology and Biomedicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2024) | Viewed by 4713

Special Issue Editors

Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
Interests: 3D bioprinting; bioink; tissue engineering; biomimetic structures; stem cells

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Guest Editor
School of Medicine, Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD, Kalamazoo, MI 49007, USA
Interests: regenerative medicine; tissue engineering; 3D bioprinting; biomaterials; bone; cartilage; skin; inflammation; differentiation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Considering the future demands that the lifetime of organs and tissues exceed that of human life, various tissue engineering methods have been developed to create tissue-mimetic structures. The 3D bioprinting method, which utilizes tissue-specific bioink, has been a key player among these methods. Although extensive work has been conducted in 3D bioprinting, the technology is still far behind in creating clinically relevant tissue mimetic structures that can be used to replace or repair damaged tissue or can be used as a model system to study various diseases. The challenges in this area are related to creating cell-loaded high fidelity functional tissue-like structures while preserving cell viability and directing cell fate. Therefore, to address these challenges, this Special Issue focuses on the advances in 3D bioprinting and bioink to create functional tissue-like structures, such as cardiac tissue, liver, kidney, vascular grafts, neural tissue, bone, and cartilage.

Dr. Alok Kumar
Dr. Adil Akkouch
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • 3D bioprinting
  • tissue engineering
  • bioink, biomimetic structure
  • 3D scaffolds

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 5094 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Visualisation of Normal Anatomy with Potential Use of Augmented Reality Superimposed on Three-Dimensional Printed Models
by Jade Geerlings-Batt, Carley Tillett, Ashu Gupta and Zhonghua Sun
Micromachines 2022, 13(10), 1701; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi13101701 - 10 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1718
Abstract
Anatomical knowledge underpins the practice of many healthcare professions. While cadaveric specimens are generally used to demonstrate realistic anatomy, high cost, ethical considerations and limited accessibility can often impede their suitability for use as teaching tools. This study aimed to develop an alternative [...] Read more.
Anatomical knowledge underpins the practice of many healthcare professions. While cadaveric specimens are generally used to demonstrate realistic anatomy, high cost, ethical considerations and limited accessibility can often impede their suitability for use as teaching tools. This study aimed to develop an alternative to traditional teaching methods; a novel teaching tool using augmented reality (AR) and three-dimensional (3D) printed models to accurately demonstrate normal ankle and foot anatomy. An open-source software (3D Slicer) was used to segment a high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dataset of a healthy volunteer ankle and produce virtual bone and musculature objects. Bone and musculature were segmented using seed-planting and interpolation functions, respectively. Virtual models were imported into Unity 3D, which was used to develop user interface and achieve interactability prior to export to the Microsoft HoloLens 2. Three life-size models of bony anatomy were printed in yellow polylactic acid and thermoplastic polyurethane, with another model printed in white Visijet SL Flex with a supporting base attached to its plantar aspect. Interactive user interface with functional toggle switches was developed. Object recognition did not function as intended, with adequate tracking and AR superimposition not achieved. The models accurately demonstrate bony foot and ankle anatomy in relation to the associated musculature. Although segmentation outcomes were sufficient, the process was highly time consuming, with effective object recognition tools relatively inaccessible. This may limit the reproducibility of augmented reality learning tools on a larger scale. Research is required to determine the extent to which this tool accurately demonstrates anatomy and ascertain whether use of this tool improves learning outcomes and is effective for teaching anatomy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in 3D Bioprinting for Tissue Engineering)
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Review

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18 pages, 7855 KiB  
Review
Ankle and Foot Arthroplasty and Prosthesis: A Review on the Current and Upcoming State of Designs and Manufacturing
by Richa Gupta, Kyra Grove, Alice Wei, Jennifer Lee and Adil Akkouch
Micromachines 2023, 14(11), 2081; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14112081 - 10 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The foot and ankle serve vital roles in weight bearing, balance, and flexibility but are susceptible to many diverse ailments, making treatment difficult. More commonly, Total Ankle Arthroplasty (TAA) and Total Talus Replacement (TTR) are used for patients with ankle degeneration and avascular [...] Read more.
The foot and ankle serve vital roles in weight bearing, balance, and flexibility but are susceptible to many diverse ailments, making treatment difficult. More commonly, Total Ankle Arthroplasty (TAA) and Total Talus Replacement (TTR) are used for patients with ankle degeneration and avascular necrosis of the talus, respectively. Ankle prosthesis and orthosis are also indicated for use with lower limb extremity amputations or locomotor disability, leading to the development of powered exoskeletons. However, patient outcomes remain suboptimal, commonly due to the misfitting of implants to the patient-specific anatomy. Additive manufacturing (AM) is being used to create customized, patient-specific implants and porous implant cages that provide structural support while allowing for increased bony ingrowth and to develop customized, lightweight exoskeletons with multifunctional actuators. AM implants and devices have shown success in preserving stability and mobility of the joint and achieving fast recovery, as well as significant improvements in gait rehabilitation, gait assistance, and strength for patients. This review of the literature highlights various devices and technologies currently used for foot and ankle prosthesis and orthosis with deep insight into improvements from historical technologies, manufacturing methods, and future developments in the biomedical space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in 3D Bioprinting for Tissue Engineering)
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