Special Issue "3D-Bioprinted Organs-on-Chips for Clinical Application"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B:Biology and Biomedicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jae Min Cha
Website
Guest Editor
3D stem cell bioengineering lab, Rm. 106, Bldg. #27, Incheon National University, 119 Academy-ro, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 22012, Korea
Interests: stem cell bioprocess; 3D bioprinted organs-on-chips; extracellular vesicle therapy; tissue engineering and bioreactor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

3D-bioprinting technology has been rapidly advanced in the new era of the fourth industrial revolution. To date, many recent studies have demonstrated preliminary 3D-bioprinting technologies that achieved the layer-by-layer assembly of multiple types of cells and extracellular matrices with highly precise spatial distrubution. Applying computer-aided design technology enabled to manufacture even more complex organs or tissues simulating their own functions. Owing to the capacity to integrate a desired 3D cellular arrangement with tissue-specific functions in a micro-scale, 3D-bioprinting has been proposed as a promising strategy for the fabrication of versatile organs-on-chips. Organ-on-a-chip is a microengineered biomimetic system that presents pathophysiological microenvironments, which can greatly facilitate the development of unprecedented medical devices for drug-screening, precision and personalized medicine, as well as in vitro diagnosis. In this Special Issue, we invite the experts outstanding in the multidisciplinary fields of biomedical engineering to discuss various 3D-bioprinting technologies employed to fabricate organs-on-chips for diverse purposes in clinical application. Technological breakthroughs including the incorporation with mechanical and/or electrical stimulatory modules and cell-laden-microfluidic biosensors are also of interst, which can provide the future perspectives in the field of 3D-bioprinted organs-on-chips.

Prof. Dr. Jae Min Cha
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D-bioprinting
  • Organ-on-a-chip
  • Clinical application
  • Mechanical stimulation
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Microfluidic biosensor
  • Drug screening
  • Precision and personalized medicine
  • In vitro diagnosis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Modeling Pharmacokinetic Profiles for Assessment of Anti-Cancer Drug on a Microfluidic System
Micromachines 2020, 11(6), 551; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11060551 - 29 May 2020
Abstract
The pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of drug, which include drug absorption and excretion, play an important role in determining the in vivo pharmaceutical activity. However, current in vitro systems that model PK profiles are often limited by the in vivo-like concentration profile of a [...] Read more.
The pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of drug, which include drug absorption and excretion, play an important role in determining the in vivo pharmaceutical activity. However, current in vitro systems that model PK profiles are often limited by the in vivo-like concentration profile of a drug. Herein, we present a perfused and multi-layered microfluidic chip system to model the PK profile of anti-cancer drug 5-FU in vitro. The chip device contains two layers of culture channels sandwiched by a porous membrane, which allows for drug exposure and diffusion between the two channels. The integration of upper intestine cells (Caco-2) and bottom targeted cells within the device enables the generation of loading and clearance portions of a PK curve under peristaltic flow. Fluorescein as a test molecule was initially used to generate a concentration-time curve, investigating the effects of parameters of flow rate, administration time, and initial concentration on dynamic drug concentration profiles. Furthermore, anti-cancer drug 5-FU was performed to assess its pharmaceutical activity on target cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cells or human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells) using different drug administration regimens. A dynamic, in vivo-like 5-FU exposure refers to PK profile regimen, led to generate a lower drug concentration (dynamically fluctuate from 0 to 1 μg/mL affected by absorption) compared to the constant exposure. Moreover, the PK profile regimen alleviates the drug-induced cytotoxicity on target cells. These results demonstrate the feasibility of determining the PK profiles using this microfluidic system with in vivo-like drug administration regimens. This established system may provide a powerful platform for the prediction of drug safety and effectiveness in the pharmaceutical research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D-Bioprinted Organs-on-Chips for Clinical Application)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Novel Strategies in Artificial Organ Development: What Is the Future of Medicine?
Micromachines 2020, 11(7), 646; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11070646 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
The technology of tissue engineering is a rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field of science that elevates cell-based research from 2D cultures through organoids to whole bionic organs. 3D bioprinting and organ-on-a-chip approaches through generation of three-dimensional cultures at different scales, applied separately or combined, [...] Read more.
The technology of tissue engineering is a rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field of science that elevates cell-based research from 2D cultures through organoids to whole bionic organs. 3D bioprinting and organ-on-a-chip approaches through generation of three-dimensional cultures at different scales, applied separately or combined, are widely used in basic studies, drug screening and regenerative medicine. They enable analyses of tissue-like conditions that yield much more reliable results than monolayer cell cultures. Annually, millions of animals worldwide are used for preclinical research. Therefore, the rapid assessment of drug efficacy and toxicity in the early stages of preclinical testing can significantly reduce the number of animals, bringing great ethical and financial benefits. In this review, we describe 3D bioprinting techniques and first examples of printed bionic organs. We also present the possibilities of microfluidic systems, based on the latest reports. We demonstrate the pros and cons of both technologies and indicate their use in the future of medicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D-Bioprinted Organs-on-Chips for Clinical Application)
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