Special Issue "Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments"

A special issue of Medicines (ISSN 2305-6320).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Enrique Barrajon

Instituto de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación en Biotecnología Sanitaria de Elche (IDiBE), Universitas Miguel Hernández, Elche, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural compounds; polyphenols; marine compounds; cancer; antimicrobial; skin; cosmetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer is stil one of the main sanitary problems worlwide causing morbility and mortality. Although many pharmacological and clinical advances have been made, there is still a need for new molecules that improve the actual portfolio. Natural compounds from animal, microbial, vegetal, or fungi origin represent countless sources of new compunds that can be used as anticancer drugs if their activity, bioavailability and toxicity are adequate.

This Special Issue aims to compile both original articles and reviews, covering the most recent advances in the use of natural compounds for cancer treatment. Clinical trials and preclinical studies are also included in the scope. In vito studies will be welcome, only if molecular mechanisms are well defined and more than a single cell line is used. Studies using natural extracts, no matter their origin, must include a full chemical characterization using chromatographic or equivalent techniques.

Assist. Prof. Dr. Enrique Barrajón-Catalán
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicines is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • natural compound
  • cancer
  • new therapy
  • clinical trial
  • preclinical study

Published Papers (7 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Oral Intake of Royal Jelly Has Protective Effects Against Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Induced Toxicity in Patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial
Received: 5 December 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 20 December 2018
PDF Full-text (544 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are still recommended as the standard therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the high frequency of adverse events is a weakness of this therapy. Because royal jelly (RJ) possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, we assessed its protective [...] Read more.
Background: Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are still recommended as the standard therapy in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the high frequency of adverse events is a weakness of this therapy. Because royal jelly (RJ) possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, we assessed its protective effects on TKI-induced toxicities in RCC patients. Methods: We enrolled 33 patients with advanced RCC who were assigned to start TKI therapy in combination with a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled RJ trial consisting of a placebo group with 17 subjects and an RJ group with 16 subjects. Results: Fatigue and anorexia frequencies in the RJ group were significantly lower than in the placebo group (p = 0.003 and 0.015, respectively). A statistically significant correlation between RJ and fatigue or anorexia was detected in sunitinib-treated patients. The dose reduction- or discontinuation-free periods were significantly longer (p = 0.013) in the RJ group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, similar observations were made in sunitinib-treated patients (p = 0.016). Conclusions: Our clinical trial showed that RJ exerted protective effects against TKI-induced fatigue and anorexia and lowered TKI dose reduction or discontinuation. Hence, RJ is beneficial for maintaining the quality of life and medication compliance in TKI-treated RCC patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Bioactive Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and Anticancer Potential of Freeze-Dried Extracts from Defatted Gac (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng) Seeds
Medicines 2018, 5(3), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines5030104
Received: 6 September 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 15 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3065 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Gac (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng) seeds have long been used in traditional medicine as a remedy for numerous conditions due to a range of bioactive compounds. This study investigated the solvent extraction of compounds that could be responsible for antioxidant activity and [...] Read more.
Background: Gac (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng) seeds have long been used in traditional medicine as a remedy for numerous conditions due to a range of bioactive compounds. This study investigated the solvent extraction of compounds that could be responsible for antioxidant activity and anticancer potential. Methods: Defatted Gac seed kernel powder was extracted with different solvents: 100% water, 50% methanol:water, 70% ethanol:water, water saturated butanol, 100% methanol, and 100% ethanol. Trypsin inhibitors, saponins, phenolics, and antioxidant activity using the 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays; and anticancer potential against two melanoma cancer cell lines (MM418C1 and D24) were analysed to determine the best extraction solvents. Results: Water was best for extracting trypsin inhibitors (581.4 ± 18.5 mg trypsin/mg) and reducing the viability of MM418C1 and D24 melanoma cells (75.5 ± 1.3 and 66.9 ± 2.2%, respectively); the anticancer potential against the MM418C1 cells was highly correlated with trypsin inhibitors (r = 0.92, p < 0.05), but there was no correlation between anticancer potential and antioxidant activity. The water saturated butanol had the highest saponins (71.8 ± 4.31 mg aescin equivalents/g), phenolic compounds (20.4 ± 0.86 mg gallic acid equivalents/g), and antioxidant activity, but these measures were not related to anticancer potential. Conclusions: Water yielded a Gac seed extract, rich in trypsin inhibitors, which had high anticancer potential against two melanoma cell lines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Differential Methylation and Acetylation as the Epigenetic Basis of Resveratrol’s Anticancer Activity
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 10 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
PDF Full-text (685 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Numerous studies support the potent anticancer activity of resveratrol and its regulation of key oncogenic signaling pathways. Additionally, the activation of sirtuin 1, a deacetylase, by resveratrol has been known for many years, making resveratrol perhaps one of the earliest nutraceuticals with associated [...] Read more.
Numerous studies support the potent anticancer activity of resveratrol and its regulation of key oncogenic signaling pathways. Additionally, the activation of sirtuin 1, a deacetylase, by resveratrol has been known for many years, making resveratrol perhaps one of the earliest nutraceuticals with associated epigenetic activity. Such epigenetic regulation by resveratrol, and the mechanism thereof, has attracted much attention in the past decade. Focusing on methylation and acetylation, the two classical epigenetic regulations, we showcase the potential of resveratrol as an effective anticancer agent by virtue of its ability to induce differential epigenetic changes. We discuss the de-repression of tumor suppressors such as BRCA-1, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and Ras Associated Domain family-1α (RASSF-1α) by methylation, PAX1 by acetylation and the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) by both methylation and acetylation, in addition to the epigenetic regulation of oncogenic NF-κB and STAT3 signaling by resveratrol. Further, we evaluate the literature supporting the potentiation of HDAC inhibitors and the inhibition of DNMTs by resveratrol in different human cancers. This discussion underlines a robust epigenetic activity of resveratrol that warrants further evaluation, particularly in clinical settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
The Multitarget Activity of Natural Extracts on Cancer: Synergy and Xenohormesis
Received: 30 November 2018 / Revised: 18 December 2018 / Accepted: 24 December 2018 / Published: 28 December 2018
PDF Full-text (1287 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It is estimated that over 60% of the approved drugs and new drug developments for cancer and infectious diseases are from natural origin. The use of natural compounds as a potential source of antitumor agents has been deeply studied in many cancer models, [...] Read more.
It is estimated that over 60% of the approved drugs and new drug developments for cancer and infectious diseases are from natural origin. The use of natural compounds as a potential source of antitumor agents has been deeply studied in many cancer models, both in vitro and in vivo. Most of the Western medicine studies are based on the use of highly selective pure compounds with strong specificity for their targets such as colchicine or taxol. Nevertheless, approximately 60% of fairly specific drugs in their initial research fail because of toxicity or ineffectiveness in late-stage preclinical studies. Moreover, cancer is a multifaceted disease that in most cases deserves a polypharmacological therapeutic approach. Complex plant-derived mixtures such as natural extracts are difficult to characterize and hardly exhibit high pharmacological potency. However, in some cases, these may provide an advantage due to their multitargeted mode of action and potential synergistic behavior. The polypharmacology approach appears to be a plausible explanation for the multigargeted mechanism of complex natural extracts on different proteins within the same signalling pathway and in several biochemical pathways at once. This review focuses on the different aspects of natural extracts in the context of anticancer activity drug development, with special attention to synergy studies and xenohormesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Probiotics in the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer
Medicines 2018, 5(3), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines5030101
Received: 20 August 2018 / Revised: 5 September 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 7 September 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (735 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The human microbiome plays many roles in inflammation, drug metabolism, and even the development of cancer that we are only beginning to understand. Colorectal cancer has been a focus for study in this field as its pathogenesis and its response to treatment have [...] Read more.
The human microbiome plays many roles in inflammation, drug metabolism, and even the development of cancer that we are only beginning to understand. Colorectal cancer has been a focus for study in this field as its pathogenesis and its response to treatment have both been linked to the functioning of microbiota. This literature review evaluates the animal and human studies that have explored this relationship. By manipulating the microbiome with interventions such as probiotic administration, we may be able to reduce colorectal cancer risk and improve the safety and effectiveness of cancer therapy even though additional clinical research is still necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Anticancer Effects of Green Tea and the Underlying Molecular Mechanisms in Bladder Cancer
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 7 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (415 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Green tea and green tea polyphenols (GTPs) are reported to inhibit carcinogenesis and malignant behavior in several diseases. Various in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that GTPs suppress the incidence and development of bladder cancer. However, at present, opinions concerning the [...] Read more.
Green tea and green tea polyphenols (GTPs) are reported to inhibit carcinogenesis and malignant behavior in several diseases. Various in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that GTPs suppress the incidence and development of bladder cancer. However, at present, opinions concerning the anticancer effects and preventive role of green tea are conflicting. In addition, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of green tea in bladder cancer remain unclear, as these effects are regulated by several cancer-related factors. A detailed understanding of the pathological roles and regulatory mechanisms at the molecular level is necessary for advancing treatment strategies based on green tea consumption for patients with bladder cancer. In this review, we discuss the anticancer effects of GTPs on the basis of data presented in in vitro studies in bladder cancer cell lines and in vivo studies using animal models, as well as new treatment strategies for patients with bladder cancer, based on green tea consumption. Finally, on the basis of the accumulated data and the main findings, we discuss the potential usefulness of green tea as an antibladder cancer agent and the future direction of green tea-based treatment strategies for these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments)
Open AccessReview
MiR-663, a MicroRNA Linked with Inflammation and Cancer That Is under the Influence of Resveratrol
Received: 8 May 2018 / Revised: 4 July 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
PDF Full-text (315 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene, RSV) is a non-flavonoid dietary polyphenol with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties that is primarily found in red berries. While RSV displays many beneficial effects in vitro, its actual effects in vivo or in animal models remain passionately debated. Recent publications [...] Read more.
Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4′-trihydroxystilbene, RSV) is a non-flavonoid dietary polyphenol with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties that is primarily found in red berries. While RSV displays many beneficial effects in vitro, its actual effects in vivo or in animal models remain passionately debated. Recent publications suggest that RSV pleiotropic effects could arise from its capability to regulate the expression and activity of microRNAs, short regulators themselves capable of regulating up to several hundreds of target genes. In particular, RSV increases microRNA miR-663 expression in different human cell lines, suggesting that at least some of its multiple beneficial properties are through the modulation of expression of this microRNA. Indeed, the expression of microRNA miR-663 is reduced in certain cancers where miR-663 is considered to act as a tumor suppressor gene, as well as in other pathologies such as cardiovascular disorders. Target of miR-663 include genes involved in tumor initiation and/or progression as well as genes involved in pathologies associated with chronic inflammation. Here, we review the direct and indirect effects of RSV on the expression of miR-663 and its target transcripts, with emphasise on TGFβ1, and their expected health benefits, and argue that elucidating the molecular effects of different classes of natural compounds on the expression of microRNAs should help to identify new therapeutic targets and design new treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds as New Cancer Treatments)
Medicines EISSN 2305-6320 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top