Special Issue "Recycled and Sustainable Materials in Composite Design"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Luke Henderson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Frontier Materials, Carbon Nexus, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds Campus, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Interests: carbon fiber compsoites; surface modification; interface analysis; organic synthesis; ionic liquids
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Filip Stojcevski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Frontier Materials, Carbon Nexus, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds Campus, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Interests: carbon fiber manufacturing; hybrid interface composites; dissimilar material bonding; recycled fiber composites; weaving; surface modification; aerospace structures
Dr. Dan Eyckens
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Frontier Materials, Carbon Nexus, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds Campus, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Interests: carbon fiber composites; surface modification; interface analysis; organic synthesis; ionic liquids; electrochemical surface modification

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Composite materials are undoubtedly making their mark in modern engineering. However, with their prolific use come concerns relating to the end of life recycling for composite parts and the sustainable acquisition of raw materials required for sustainable and low-cost production. This Special Edition of Materials will focus on attacking the problems associated with recycling and sustainable material management/usage to ensure composites are a viable material in the future of engineering.

Specific focus will be given to carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites, glass fiber composites, metal–composite hybrid materials, and natural fiber composites; however, papers not specific to these materials will also be considered on a case-by-case basis depending on novelty and relevance. Research would ideally address the following topics:

  • Methods of improving chopped fiber and milled fiber composite performance;
  • Use of novel and low-cost precursors for composite production;
  • Novel methods of recycling existing composite parts;
  • Physical, chemical, and mechanical characterization of recycled composite materials;
  • Insights into the effects of recycled composite materials and how they may be used to create a circular economy for material usage.
Prof. Luke Henderson
Dr. Filip Stojcevski
Dr. Dan Eyckens
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Recycled CFRP composites
  • Sustainable composites
  • Chopped carbon fibers
  • Milled carbon fibers
  • Low cost precursors
  • Dissimilar material recycling
  • Glass fiber composites
  • Natural fiber composites
  • Hybrid materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
A New Design of Recycled Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer Rubber Modified Epoxy Based Composites Reinforced with Alumina Fiber: Fracture Behavior and Damage Analyses
Materials 2019, 12(17), 2729; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12172729 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
This study proposes a new design of lightweight and cost-efficient composite materials for the automotive industry using recycled fresh scrap rubbers (EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) rubbers), epoxy resin and alumina (Al2O3) fibers (AF). Three-point bending tests were conducted [...] Read more.
This study proposes a new design of lightweight and cost-efficient composite materials for the automotive industry using recycled fresh scrap rubbers (EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) rubbers), epoxy resin and alumina (Al2O3) fibers (AF). Three-point bending tests were conducted to investigate fundamental mechanical characteristics and then experimentally obtained moduli were compared with a modified Halpin–Tsai model. In addition, tests were carried out to study the fracture characteristics of the composites. Then, a practical numerical study was carried out to observe the evolution of the strain energy release rate along the crack front. Mechanical test results showed that the reinforcement with AF improved the fracture toughness of these novel composites for low rubber contents. Besides, increasing recycled EPDM rubber content degraded the mechanical resistance and strain at break of the composites. Moreover, numerical studies indicated that energy release rate showed some variations along the specimen thickness. Toughening mechanisms were evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) fractography. Typical toughening mechanisms observed were fiber bridging and shear yielding. By considering the advantageous effects of AF on the novel composites and cost efficiency under favor of recycled rubbers, these composites are promising candidates to manufacture the various components in automotive industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled and Sustainable Materials in Composite Design)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Preliminary Characterization of Novel LDPE-Based Wear-Resistant Composite Suitable for FDM 3D Printing
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2520; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162520 - 08 Aug 2019
Abstract
Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) composites reinforced with finely powdered waste glass were identified as a potential material for 3D printed structures for use in low-duty frictional applications. A recently published 3D printing model was used to calculate the limits in the filament feed rate [...] Read more.
Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) composites reinforced with finely powdered waste glass were identified as a potential material for 3D printed structures for use in low-duty frictional applications. A recently published 3D printing model was used to calculate the limits in the filament feed rate and printing speed. Tribological tests (pin-on-disc method) of the printed composites were performed for different print-path directions. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was performed on the samples and the composites showed a higher crystallinity compared with LDPE, which partially explains the higher elastic modulus of the composites determined during static tensile tests. Using a fine glass powder as reinforcement improved the wear resistance of LDPE by 50% due to the formation of a sliding film on the sample’s surface. An evident effect of friction direction vs. the printed path direction on wear was found; which was likely related to differences in the removal of friction products from the friction area for different print-path directions. The LDPE composites with fine waste glass particles are promising materials for low-duty frictional applications and should be the subject of further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recycled and Sustainable Materials in Composite Design)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop