Special Issue "Advanced Plasma Processes for Nanotechnologies"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anton Nikiforov
Website
Guest Editor
Research Unit of Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Belgium
Interests: atmosperic pressure plasmas; plasmas with liquid; optical methods of plasma diagnostics; plasma deposition; novel materials; antibacterial coatings; nano-composites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasma processing has proven to be an invaluable tool in many areas, including materials engineering and nanotechnology. There is no doubt that it would be impossible to reach the current level of progress in semiconductor and electronics industries without the use of plasma technology. In recent decades, a great deal of effort has been made in establishing novel approaches for the control of material chemical composition and morphology at the nano-scale. Plasma etching and plasma ion implantation processes operating at low pressure are already capable of manufacturing surfaces at a scale of tens of nanometers, whereas plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition can even be applied to tune surface properties with atomic-level resolution. Currently, plasma processing at low, medium, and even atmospheric pressure has spread to the synthesis of a variety of nanoparticles, to generate the nano-patterning of surfaces, to modify the surface of scaffolds, and to many other fields where the nano-scale manipulation of material surface or bulk properties is required. Enormous progress has been achieved in photonic materials, biodegradable polymers, catalysts, and others with the use of methods of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition and plasma polymerization. Novel advanced plasma processing methods have made strong contributions to nanotechnology, and an increase of plasma processing’s impact on nanoscience is foreseen in the short- and long-term.

This Special Issue will focus on recent progress in the development of novel plasma processes for establishing new trends in nanotechnology and material science. Special attention will be given to the engineering of nano-materials with unique properties for the demands of biomedical, chemical, and semiconductor industries; catalysts synthesis; and thin coatings, including clusters and nano-composites. The scope of the Special Issue is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in the field of plasma methods for nano-materials engineering and to give insight into physical and chemical backgrounds of plasma processing.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Dr. Anton Nikiforov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plasma-assisted deposition
  • aerosol-enhanced plasma deposition
  • nano-particles plasma synthesis
  • plasma-modified catalysts
  • nano-composites
  • bioinspired nano-materials
  • nano-cluster coatings
  • photonic materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Deposition of Organosilicon Thin Films by Direct Current and Radio-frequency Plasma Jets
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1296; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061296 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
Thin film deposition with atmospheric pressure plasmas is highly interesting for industrial demands and scientific interests in the field of biomaterials. However, the engineering of high-quality films by high-pressure plasmas with precise control over morphology and surface chemistry still poses a challenge. The [...] Read more.
Thin film deposition with atmospheric pressure plasmas is highly interesting for industrial demands and scientific interests in the field of biomaterials. However, the engineering of high-quality films by high-pressure plasmas with precise control over morphology and surface chemistry still poses a challenge. The two types of atmospheric-pressure plasma depositions of organosilicon films by the direct and indirect injection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) precursor into a plasma region were chosen and compared in terms of the films chemical composition and morphology to address this. Although different methods of plasma excitation were used, the deposition of inorganic films with above 98% of SiO2 content was achieved for both cases. The chemical structure of the films was insignificantly dependent on the substrate type. The deposition in the afterglow of the DC discharge resulted in a soft film with high roughness, whereas RF plasma deposition led to a smoother film. In the case of the RF plasma deposition on polymeric materials resulted in films with delamination and cracks formation. Lastly, despite some material limitations, both deposition methods demonstrated significant potential for SiOx thin-films preparation for a variety of bio-related substrates, including glass, ceramics, metals, and polymers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Plasma Processes for Nanotechnologies)
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Open AccessArticle
Exploiting Plasma Exposed, Natural Surface Nanostructures in Ramie Fibers for Polymer Composite Applications
Materials 2019, 12(10), 1631; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12101631 - 18 May 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Nanoscale surface morphology of plant fibers has important implications for the interfacial bonding in fiber-polymer composites. In this study, we investigated and quantified the effect of plasma-surface modification on ramie plant fibers as a potential tool for simple and efficient surface modification. The [...] Read more.
Nanoscale surface morphology of plant fibers has important implications for the interfacial bonding in fiber-polymer composites. In this study, we investigated and quantified the effect of plasma-surface modification on ramie plant fibers as a potential tool for simple and efficient surface modification. The extensive investigation of the effects of plasma treatment of the fiber surface nano-morphology and its effect on the fiber-polymer interface was performed by Low-Voltages Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis, fiber-resin angle measurements and mechanical (tensile) testing. The LV-SEM imaging of uncoated plasma treated fibers reveals nanostructures such as microfibrils and elementary fibrils and their importance for fiber mechanical properties, fiber wettability, and fiber-polymer matrix interlocking which all peak at short plasma treatment times. Thus, such treatment can be an effective in modifying the fiber surface characteristics and fiber-polymer matrix interlocking favorably for composite applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Plasma Processes for Nanotechnologies)
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