Special Issue "Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) and Nanomaterials in Water Treatment and Purification"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dror Avisar
Website
Guest Editor
Hydro-Chemistry and Water Research Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel
Interests: environmental chemistry, hydrochemistry, micro and nano polltants, wastewater treatment technologies, AOPs
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) was recently chosen by the EPA as their favorite and most beneficial advanced treatment for micro pollutants degradation in domestic, agricultural, and industrial wastewater. Additionally, the present of natural and artificial nano materials in various water resources is a controversial topic. On one hand, nanomaterials can effectively remove various pollutants in water and thus have been successfully applied in water and wastewater treatment; however, on the other hand, nanomaterials have already been indicated as a toxic, non-degradable persistent group of pollutants.

This Special Issue aims to consider the state-of-the-art manuscripts dealing and discussing these topics, representing cutting-edge results and innovative technologies constructed on basic science studies to applied science, semi and full pilots studies, and projects. Both academic and industrial views will be given for a better understanding of advanced oxidation processes and the fate of nanomaterials in water, to save our aquatic environments and protect human health, globally.

Authors with expertise in these topics are cordially invited to submit their manuscripts to this Special Issue of Materials. Significant original papers and review articles are welcome.

Prof. Dror Avisar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • • effluents • oxidation • pollutants • water treatment • purification • micro and nano-materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
TiO2 Modified with Organic Acids for the Decomposition of Chlorfenvinphos under the Influence of Visible Light: Activity, Performance, Adsorption, and Kinetics
Materials 2020, 13(2), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020289 - 08 Jan 2020
Abstract
Photocatalytic decomposition of chlorfenvinphos (CFVP) in the presence of titanium dioxide (TiO2) modified with organic acids: pyruvic (PA) and succinic (SA) under the visible light radiation has been studied. The following tests were examined: dose of photocatalysts, adsorption time, pH of [...] Read more.
Photocatalytic decomposition of chlorfenvinphos (CFVP) in the presence of titanium dioxide (TiO2) modified with organic acids: pyruvic (PA) and succinic (SA) under the visible light radiation has been studied. The following tests were examined: dose of photocatalysts, adsorption time, pH of the model solution, deactivation of catalysts, the role of oxygen, identification of free radicals for the CFVP decomposition, Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics. The synthesized materials were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and UV-Vis. At 10 wt.% of acid (90:10) decomposition of chlorfenvinphos was the most effective in the following conditions: dose of catalyst 50.0 mg/L, time of adsorption = 20 min, pH of model solution = 3.0. Under these conditions the order of photocatalyst efficiency has been proposed: TiO2/PA/90:10 > TiO2/SA/90:10 > TiO2 with the removal degree of 85, 72 and 48%. The mathematically calculated half-life at this conditions was 27.0 min and 39.0 min for TiO2/PA/90:10 and TiO2/SA/90:10 respectively, compared to 98 min for pure TiO2. It has been determined that the O2•− radicals and holes (h+) are the main reactive species involved in the photodegradation of chlorfenvinphos. The results of this study showed that method may be an interesting alternative for the treatment of chlorfenvinphos contaminated wastewater. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
LP-UV-Nano MgO2 Pretreated Catalysis Followed by Small Bioreactor Platform Capsules Treatment for Superior Kinetic Degradation Performance of 17α-Ethynylestradiol
Materials 2020, 13(1), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010083 - 23 Dec 2019
Abstract
A successful attempt to degrade synthetic estrogen 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is demonstrated via combining photocatalysis employing magnesium peroxide (MgO2)/low-pressure ultraviolet (LP-UV) treatment followed by biological treatment using small bioreactor platform (SBP) capsules. Reusable MgO2 was synthesized through wet chemical synthesis and [...] Read more.
A successful attempt to degrade synthetic estrogen 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) is demonstrated via combining photocatalysis employing magnesium peroxide (MgO2)/low-pressure ultraviolet (LP-UV) treatment followed by biological treatment using small bioreactor platform (SBP) capsules. Reusable MgO2 was synthesized through wet chemical synthesis and extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) for phase confirmation, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for elemental composition, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) to explain a specific surface area, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging surface morphology, and UV-visible (Vis) spectrophotometry. The degradation mechanism of EE2 by MgO2/LP-UV consisted of LP-UV photolysis of H2O2 in situ (produced by the catalyst under ambient conditions) to generate hydroxyl radicals, and the degradation extent depended on both MgO2 and UV dose. Moreover, the catalyst was successfully reusable for the removal of EE2. Photocatalytic treatment by MgO2 alone required 60 min (~1700 mJ/cm2) to remove 99% of the EE2, whereas biodegradation by SBP capsules alone required 24 h to remove 86% of the EE2, and complete removal was not reached. The sequential treatment of photocatalysis and SBP biodegradation to achieve complete removal required only 25 min of UV (~700 mJ/cm2) and 4 h of biodegradation (instead of >24 h). The combination of UV photocatalysis and biodegradation produced a greater level of EE2 degradation at a lower LP-UV dose and at less biodegradation time than either treatment used separately, proving that synergetic photocatalysis and biodegradation are effective treatments for degrading EE2. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Treatment of Diethyl Phthalate Leached from Plastic Products in Municipal Solid Waste Using an Ozone-Based Advanced Oxidation Process
Materials 2019, 12(24), 4119; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12244119 - 09 Dec 2019
Abstract
Plastic products in municipal solid waste result in the extraction of phthalates in leachate that also contains large amounts of organic matter, such as humic substances, ammonia, metals, chlorinated organics, phenolic compounds, and pesticide residues. Phthalate esters are endocrine disruptors, categorized as a [...] Read more.
Plastic products in municipal solid waste result in the extraction of phthalates in leachate that also contains large amounts of organic matter, such as humic substances, ammonia, metals, chlorinated organics, phenolic compounds, and pesticide residues. Phthalate esters are endocrine disruptors, categorized as a priority pollutant by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Biological processes are inefficient at degrading phthalates due to their stability and toxic characteristics. In this study, the peroxone (ozone/hydrogen peroxide) process (O3/H2O2), an O3-based advanced oxidation process (AOP), was demonstrated for the removal of diethyl phthalate (DEP) in synthetic leachate simulating solid-waste leachate from an open dump. The impact of the O3 dose during DEP degradation; the formation of ozonation intermediate by-products; and the effects of H2O2 dose, pH, and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UVC) were determined during ozonation. Removal of 99.9% of an initial 20 mg/L DEP was obtained via 120 min of ozonation (transferred O3 dose = 4971 mg/L) with 40 mg/L H2O2 in a semi-batch O3 system. Degradation mechanisms of DEP along with its intermediate products were also determined for the AOP treatment. Indirect OH radical exposure was determined by using a radical probe compound (pCBA) in the O3 treatment. Full article
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