materials-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Advances in Organic Bioelectronic Materials and Devices

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 7936

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
Interests: organic electronics and bioelectronics; biosensing; 3D printed electronics; healthcare 4.0
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CNR - SuPerconducting and Other INnovative Materials and Devices Institute, Napoli, NA, Italy
Interests: organic electronics and bioelectronics; chemical and biological sensing; field-effect and electrochemical transistors; organic–inorganic hybrid compounds; charge transport phenomena; film deposition techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are currently witnessing a massive development of bioelectronic devices based on organic, biocompatible functional materials, which are at the cutting edge of technological solutions able to promote an efficient interfacing between the biological world and electronics. Organic Bioelectronics takes advantage of the ability of organic (semi)conductors to intrinsically show a mixed ionic–electronic charge carrier conduction. This peculiar feature allows to bridge the gap between biosignaling relying on the flow of ionic charges and standard electronics based on conventional (semi)conductors. Electroactivity, flexibility/stretchability/conformability, capability of working in wet ambient at very low operation voltages, ease of processing, and the functional character of organics have paved the way towards the design and fabrication of several kinds of biosensors and electrodes for application in medicine, environmental, and agri-food monitoring. The use of organic materials also extends to other kinds of devices, such as neuromorphic memory devices, drug delivery systems, lab-on-chip platforms, and optical biomolecular devices.

This Special Issue is meant to be a collection of studies describing recent advances and achievements in Organic Bioelectronics. The presented articles and communications will cover various topics, including materials preparation and engineering, design, manufacturing, and modeling of bioelectronic devices and interfaces, optical biosensors, bioelectrodes, lab-on-chip platforms, electrochemical methods in bioelectronics, 3D printed bioelectronic devices, neuromorphic devices, and so on. Review articles addressing new possible strategies, enlightening novel perspectives, and expanding beyond a mere summary of facts, are also welcomed.

Dr. Pasquale D'Angelo
Dr. Mario Barra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Organic bioelectronic materials and devices
  • Biosensing
  • Lab-on-chip platforms
  • Optical biosensors
  • Biointerfaces and functionalization
  • Electrochemical biosensing
  • Neuromorphic devices
  • 3D printed bioelectronic devices.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 2605 KiB  
Article
Label-Free Split Aptamer Sensor for Femtomolar Detection of Dopamine by Means of Flexible Organic Electrochemical Transistors
by Yuanying Liang, Ting Guo, Lei Zhou, Andreas Offenhäusser and Dirk Mayer
Materials 2020, 13(11), 2577; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112577 - 5 Jun 2020
Cited by 36 | Viewed by 4734
Abstract
The detection of chemical messenger molecules, such as neurotransmitters in nervous systems, demands high sensitivity to measure small variations, selectivity to eliminate interferences from analogues, and compliant devices to be minimally invasive to soft tissue. Here, an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) embedded in [...] Read more.
The detection of chemical messenger molecules, such as neurotransmitters in nervous systems, demands high sensitivity to measure small variations, selectivity to eliminate interferences from analogues, and compliant devices to be minimally invasive to soft tissue. Here, an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) embedded in a flexible polyimide substrate is utilized as transducer to realize a highly sensitive dopamine aptasensor. A split aptamer is tethered to a gold gate electrode and the analyte binding can be detected optionally either via an amperometric or a potentiometric transducer principle. The amperometric sensor can detect dopamine with a limit of detection of 1 μM, while the novel flexible OECT-based biosensor exhibits an ultralow detection limit down to the concentration of 0.5 fM, which is lower than all previously reported electrochemical sensors for dopamine detection. The low detection limit can be attributed to the intrinsic amplification properties of OECTs. Furthermore, a significant response to dopamine inputs among interfering analogues hallmarks the selective detection capabilities of this sensor. The high sensitivity and selectivity, as well as the flexible properties of the OECT-based aptasensor, are promising features for their integration in neuronal probes for the in vitro or in vivo detection of neurochemical signals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Organic Bioelectronic Materials and Devices)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

10 pages, 1740 KiB  
Article
Eumelanin Precursor 2-Carboxy-5,6-Dihydroxyindole (DHICA) as Doping Factor in Ternary (PEDOT:PSS/Eumelanin) Thin Films for Conductivity Enhancement
by Ludovico Migliaccio, Felice Gesuele, Paola Manini, Maria Grazia Maglione, Paolo Tassini and Alessandro Pezzella
Materials 2020, 13(9), 2108; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13092108 - 2 May 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2618
Abstract
The integration of the pristine not-doped commercial poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) PH1000 with eumelanin, the brown to black kind of melanin pigment, was achieved by dissolving the melanogenic precursors 2-carboxy-5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHICA) in the PH1000 suspension. Solid state oxidative polymerization of the catecholic indole allowed obtaining [...] Read more.
The integration of the pristine not-doped commercial poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) PH1000 with eumelanin, the brown to black kind of melanin pigment, was achieved by dissolving the melanogenic precursors 2-carboxy-5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHICA) in the PH1000 suspension. Solid state oxidative polymerization of the catecholic indole allowed obtaining the ternary blend PEDOT:PSS/eumelanin. The introduction of DHICA into PH1000 produced a noticeable increase in the conductivity of PEDOT thin films akin to that produced by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment, opening up novel strategies for the simultaneous integration of eumelanin polymer and conductivity enhancement of PEDOT containing coatings, as well as the long term goal of replacing PSS by DHICA eumelanin for PEDOT pairing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Organic Bioelectronic Materials and Devices)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop