3D Bioprinting for Personalized Medicine

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 10134

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy
Interests: bioprinting; 3D modeling; artificial intelligence; biomaterials; sustainability; healthcare 4.0
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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences Medicine, University of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy
Interests: animal health; drug delivery; smart devices for drug delivery; biomaterials; 3D modeling
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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Sciences Medicine, University of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy
Interests: animal health; drug delivery; smart devices for drug delivery; biomaterials; surgery; anesthesiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
Interests: organic electronics and bioelectronics; biosensing; 3D printed electronics; healthcare 4.0
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy
Interests: osteochondral tissue regeneration; collagen hydrogel; endothelial cells; mesenchymal cells; cell culture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

3D bioprinting enables rapid customization of personalized devices, drugs and applications, achieving the ability to restore the tissue functionality. 

The manufacturing of these devices requires the implementation of a new type of bio-factory, industry 5.0. In the society 5.0, this type of production paradigm uses artificial intelligence for the optimal management of process data. Hence, it is mandatory to structure the human-cyber-physical space through the global standard method for society 5.0, developing digital bio-libraries linked to a specific pathology, processing data for disease regression and rehabilitation therapy. 

The pathological bio-library must take into consideration all the aspects related to the design and the development of the aforementioned biological systems, taking into account all the phases required to achieve smart bioprinting (6D).

This special issue aims to collect research articles related to the 3D printing of: biosensors capable to collect data and support the big-data chain; drug delivery devices to test pharmacological therapy; bio-composite materials to enable tissue regeneration and, scalable in-vivo validation methods on biosynthetic models supporting 3Rs by using 3D bioprinting.  

The goal is to support bioengineers, biologists and innovation managers in the development of future industry 5.0 and digital libraries related to bionic and biosynthetic design, at the basis of artificial intelligences adoption within hospitals and healthcare systems.

Prof. Dr. Ruben Foresti
Prof. Dr. Maddalena Botti
Prof. Dr. Fabio Leonardi
Dr. Pasquale D'Angelo
Prof. Dr. Roberto Sala
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • 3D bioprinting
  • personalized medicine
  • sensors
  • drug delivery
  • tissue regeneration
  • zero failure

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 8345 KiB  
Article
Understanding the Role of Biofilms in Acute Recurrent Tonsillitis through 3D Bioprinting of a Novel Gelatin-PEGDA Hydrogel
by Oliver Denton, Yifei Wan, Laura Beattie, Téa Jack, Preston McGoldrick, Holly McAllister, Cara Mullan, Catriona M. Douglas and Wenmiao Shu
Bioengineering 2024, 11(3), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11030202 - 21 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Acute recurrent tonsillitis is a chronic, biofilm-related infection that is a significant burden to patients and healthcare systems. It is often treated with repeated courses of antibiotics, which contributes to antimicrobial resistance. Studying biofilms is key to understanding this disease. In vitro modelling [...] Read more.
Acute recurrent tonsillitis is a chronic, biofilm-related infection that is a significant burden to patients and healthcare systems. It is often treated with repeated courses of antibiotics, which contributes to antimicrobial resistance. Studying biofilms is key to understanding this disease. In vitro modelling using 3D bioprinted hydrogels is a promising approach to achieve this. A novel gelatin-PEGDA pseudomonas fluorescens-laden bioink was developed and bioprinted in a 3D hydrogel construct fabricated using computer-aided design to mimic the tonsillar biofilm environment. The bioprinted constructs were cultured at 37 °C in lysogeny broth for 12 days. Bacterial growth was assessed by spectrophotometry. Cellular viability analysis was conducted using optical fluorescence microscopy (FDA/PI staining). A biocompatible 3D-printed bacteria-laden hydrogel construct was successfully fabricated. Bacterial growth was observed using optical fluorescence microscopy. A live/dead cellular-staining protocol demonstrated bacterial viability. Results obtained after the 12-day culture period showed higher bacterial growth in the 1% gelatin concentration construct compared to the 0% control. This study demonstrates the first use of a bacteria-laden gelatin-PEGDA hydrogel for biofabrication of a 3D-printed construct designed to model acute recurrent tonsillitis. Initiating a study with clinically relevant ex vivo tonsil bacteria will be an important next step in improving treatment of this impactful but understudied disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Bioprinting for Personalized Medicine)
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15 pages, 11761 KiB  
Article
Characterization of 3D-Bioprinted In Vitro Lung Cancer Models Using RNA-Sequencing Techniques
by Sheng Zou, Jiayue Ye, Yiping Wei and Jianjun Xu
Bioengineering 2023, 10(6), 667; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10060667 - 1 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1594
Abstract
Objective: To construct an in vitro lung cancer model using 3D bioprinting and evaluate the feasibility of the model. Transcriptome sequencing was used to compare the differential genes and functions of 2D and 3D lung cancer cells. Methods: 1. A549 cells were mixed [...] Read more.
Objective: To construct an in vitro lung cancer model using 3D bioprinting and evaluate the feasibility of the model. Transcriptome sequencing was used to compare the differential genes and functions of 2D and 3D lung cancer cells. Methods: 1. A549 cells were mixed with sodium alginate/gelatine/fibrinogen as 3D-printed biological ink to construct a hydrogel scaffold for the in vitro model of lung cancer; 2. A hydrogel scaffold was printed using a extrusion 3D bioprinter; 3. The printed lung cancer model was evaluated in vitro; and 4. A549 cells cultured in 2D and 3D tumour models in vitro were collected, and RNA-seq conducted bioinformatics analysis. Results: 1. The in vitro lung cancer model printed using 3D-bioprinting technology was a porous microstructure model, suitable for the survival of A549 cells. Compared with the 2D cell-line model, the 3D model is closer to the fundamental human growth environment; 2. There was no significant difference in cell survival rate between the 2D and 3D groups; 3. In the cell proliferation rate measurement, it was found that the cells in the 2D group had a speedy growth rate in the first five days, but after five days, the growth rate slowed down. Cell proliferation showed a declining process after the ninth day of cell culture. However, cells in the 3D group showed a slow growth process at the beginning, and the growth rate reached a peak on the 12th day. Then, the growth rate showed a downward trend; and 4. RNA-seq compared A549 cells from 2D and 3D lung cancer models. A total of 3112 genes were differentially expressed, including 1189 up-regulated and 1923 down-regulated genes, with p-value ≤ 0.05 and |Log2Ratio| ≥ 1 as screening conditions. After functional enrichment analysis of differential genes, these differential genes affect the biological regulation of A549 cells, thus promoting lung cancer progression. Conclusion: This study uses 3D-bioprinting technology to construct a tumour model of lung cancer that can grow sustainably in vitro. Three-dimensional bioprinting may provide a new research platform for studying the lung cancer TME mechanism and anticancer drug screening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Bioprinting for Personalized Medicine)
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Review

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24 pages, 553 KiB  
Review
The Upper Limb Orthosis in the Rehabilitation of Stroke Patients: The Role of 3D Printing
by Andrea Demeco, Ruben Foresti, Antonio Frizziero, Nicola Daracchi, Francesco Renzi, Margherita Rovellini, Antonello Salerno, Chiara Martini, Laura Pelizzari and Cosimo Costantino
Bioengineering 2023, 10(11), 1256; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10111256 - 27 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2105
Abstract
Stroke represents the third cause of long-term disability in the world. About 80% of stroke patients have an impairment of bio-motor functions and over half fail to regain arm functionality, resulting in motor movement control disorder with serious loss in terms of social [...] Read more.
Stroke represents the third cause of long-term disability in the world. About 80% of stroke patients have an impairment of bio-motor functions and over half fail to regain arm functionality, resulting in motor movement control disorder with serious loss in terms of social independence. Therefore, rehabilitation plays a key role in the reduction of patient disabilities, and 3D printing (3DP) has showed interesting improvements in related fields, thanks to the possibility to produce customized, eco-sustainable and cost-effective orthoses. This study investigated the clinical use of 3DP orthosis in rehabilitation compared to the traditional ones, focusing on the correlation between 3DP technology, therapy and outcomes. We screened 138 articles from PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science, selecting the 10 articles fulfilling the inclusion criteria, which were subsequently examined for the systematic review. The results showed that 3DP provides substantial advantages in terms of upper limb orthosis designed on the patient’s needs. Moreover, seven research activities used biodegradable/recyclable materials, underlining the great potential of validated 3DP solutions in a clinical rehabilitation setting. The aim of this study was to highlight how 3DP could overcome the limitations of standard medical devices in order to support clinicians, bioengineers and innovation managers during the implementation of Healthcare 4.0. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Bioprinting for Personalized Medicine)
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17 pages, 906 KiB  
Review
(Bio)printing in Personalized Medicine—Opportunities and Potential Benefits
by Dobromira Shopova, Antoniya Yaneva, Desislava Bakova, Anna Mihaylova, Petya Kasnakova, Maria Hristozova, Yordan Sbirkov, Victoria Sarafian and Mariya Semerdzhieva
Bioengineering 2023, 10(3), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10030287 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4034
Abstract
The global development of technologies now enters areas related to human health, with a transition from conventional to personalized medicine that is based to a significant extent on (bio)printing. The goal of this article is to review some of the published scientific literature [...] Read more.
The global development of technologies now enters areas related to human health, with a transition from conventional to personalized medicine that is based to a significant extent on (bio)printing. The goal of this article is to review some of the published scientific literature and to highlight the importance and potential benefits of using 3D (bio)printing techniques in contemporary personalized medicine and also to offer future perspectives in this research field. The article is prepared according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect databases were used in the literature search. Six authors independently performed the search, study selection, and data extraction. This review focuses on 3D bio(printing) in personalized medicine and provides a classification of 3D bio(printing) benefits in several categories: overcoming the shortage of organs for transplantation, elimination of problems due to the difference between sexes in organ transplantation, reducing the cases of rejection of transplanted organs, enhancing the survival of patients with transplantation, drug research and development, elimination of genetic/congenital defects in tissues and organs, and surgery planning and medical training for young doctors. In particular, we highlight the benefits of each 3D bio(printing) applications included along with the associated scientific reports from recent literature. In addition, we present an overview of some of the challenges that need to be overcome in the applications of 3D bioprinting in personalized medicine. The reviewed articles lead to the conclusion that bioprinting may be adopted as a revolution in the development of personalized, medicine and it has a huge potential in the near future to become a gold standard in future healthcare in the world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Bioprinting for Personalized Medicine)
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