Special Issue "Novel Magnetic Nanomaterials: from Fundamental Sciences to Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Lise Marie Lacroix
Website
Guest Editor
Universite de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
Interests: nanoparticles; liquid-phase synthesis; nanomagnetism; controlled assembly; permanent magnet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnetic materials are widely spread in our daily life either as soft materials for microelectronics, radio-frequency devices and biomedical uses (such as contrast agents for sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or efficient heater media for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH)) or as permanent magnets. Ranging from electronic power generation conversion and transportation, the domain of applications of magnets is exponentially growing.       

Commercially available magnetic materials are inherently nanostructured materials and are usually prepared following classical metallurgy processes. Difficulties are however encountered when one wants to reduce the size of the final magnetic material, because of process incompatibilities. Thus, alternative approaches have been intensively sought. Among them, the bottom-up approach, which consists in assembling optimized nanoparticles into new metamaterials, is an alternative of primary choice. Indeed, the recent developments in nanochemistry have yielded an infinite richness of nano-crystals with tuneable sizes and shapes, which could be succesfully used as optimized building blocks.

The conception and realization of novel magnetic nanomaterials rely on several scientific challenges : i) the synthesis of optimized magnetic nanoparticles, ii) the fine characterization of their magnetic performances, iii) their controlled assembly into new metamaterials, and iv) their final integration into functionnal devices.

Research efforts in these four key challenges are essential to design the next generation of magnetic materials, combining reduced sizes and optimal performances. Therefore, it is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Assoc. Prof. Lise Marie Lacroix
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • self-assembly
  • permanent magnets
  • soft magnets
  • nanomagnetism

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Use of Low-Cost Magnetic Materials Containing Waste Derivatives for the (Photo)-Fenton Removal of Organic Pollutants
Materials 2019, 12(23), 3942; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12233942 - 28 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Hybrid magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles (MNP) coated with waste-sourced bio-based substances (BBS) were synthesized and studied for the degradation of phenol, chosen as a model pollutant, in water. A systematic study was undertaken in order to rationalize MNP–BBS behavior and optimize their performance. The effect [...] Read more.
Hybrid magnetite/maghemite nanoparticles (MNP) coated with waste-sourced bio-based substances (BBS) were synthesized and studied for the degradation of phenol, chosen as a model pollutant, in water. A systematic study was undertaken in order to rationalize MNP–BBS behavior and optimize their performance. The effect of experimental parameters, such as light irradiation, addition of hydrogen peroxide, and the ratio between hydrogen peroxide and MNP–BBS concentrations, was studied. The generation of hydroxyl radicals was assessed, and the recovery and re-cycle of the material was investigated. Our results indicate that phenol degradation could be attained by both Fenton and photo-Fenton processes, with higher efficiency in dark condition and in the presence of a suitable amount of hydrogen peroxide. Evidence was obtained for the roles of iron ions leached from the materials as well as of organic matter released in the solution upon partial photodegradation of the organic coating. The reusability tests indicated a lower but still valid performance of the material. Optimization of the experimental conditions was performed to achieve the highest efficiency in substrate degradation, and fundamental insights into the mechanism of the MNP–BBS Fenton-like reaction were obtained. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Inductive Thermal Effect of Ferrite Magnetic Nanoparticles
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3208; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193208 - 30 Sep 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Localized heat induction using magnetic nanoparticles under an alternating magnetic field is an emerging technology applied in areas including, cancer treatment, thermally activated drug release and remote activation of cell functions. To enhance the induction heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles, the intrinsic and [...] Read more.
Localized heat induction using magnetic nanoparticles under an alternating magnetic field is an emerging technology applied in areas including, cancer treatment, thermally activated drug release and remote activation of cell functions. To enhance the induction heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles, the intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic parameters influencing the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles should be effectively engineered. This review covers the recent progress in the optimization of magnetic properties of spinel ferrite nanoparticles for efficient heat induction. The key materials factors for efficient magnetic heating including size, shape, composition, inter/intra particle interactions are systematically discussed, from the growth mechanism, process control to chemical and magnetic properties manipulation. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Properties of Cement-Based Composites Modified with Magnetite Nanoparticles: A Review
Materials 2019, 12(2), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020326 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 9
Abstract
Despite the many available studies on the evaluation of the influence of nanomaterials on the properties of cement-based composites, the effects of some nanoparticles have not yet been fully recognized. Among the unrecognized nanomaterials are magnetite nanoparticles (MN). The literature devoted to this [...] Read more.
Despite the many available studies on the evaluation of the influence of nanomaterials on the properties of cement-based composites, the effects of some nanoparticles have not yet been fully recognized. Among the unrecognized nanomaterials are magnetite nanoparticles (MN). The literature devoted to this subject is limited. This paper reviews state-of-the-art research carried out on the effect of MN on the properties of cement-based composites. Detailed descriptions of the processing, microstructures (hydration products), properties (hydration, workability, mechanical and functional properties, and durability), and probability applications of MN-engineered cementitious composites are presented. Particular attention has been paid to MN application methods to the cement composite. Finally, the risks, challenges, and future development of MN-modified cement-based composites is discussed. Full article
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