Special Issue "Metallic Nanoparticles in Heterogeneous Catalysis"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Catalytic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Assist. Prof. András Sápi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
Interests: controlled size nanoparticles; interfaces; heterogeneous catalysis; molecular level understanding by in situ techniques

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Heterogeneous catalysis is the prime mover of the majority of the chemical processes in the chemical industrial world. Environmental concerns also have a need for catalysts with high activity and selectivity. Besides bulk metallic catalysts, supported metallic nanoparticles are the basis of these catalytic systems. Nanoparticles have great advantages that originate from the high surface-to-volume ratio, the special surface concentrations of the different Miller indices planes, the different surface rearrangement and the cell parameters compared to the bulk counterparts. Nanoparticles that are anchored onto the surface of different metallic-oxide surfaces can open up an extra way of tuning catalytic activity and selectivity.

In this Special Issue, we are focusing of the synthesis, characterization and application of selfstanding or supported mono- or multi-metallic nanoparticles in gas or liquid phase heterogeneous catalysis.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Assist. Prof. András Sápi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metallic nanoparticles
  • heterogeneous catalysis
  • metal-support interfaces
  • in situ techniques
  • selective synthesis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Bimetallic Nanoparticles as a Model System for an Industrial NiMo Catalyst
Materials 2019, 12(22), 3727; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12223727 - 12 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
An in-depth understanding of the reaction mechanism is required for the further development of Mo-based catalysts for biobased feedstocks. However, fundamental studies of industrial catalysts are challenging, and simplified systems are often used without direct comparison to their industrial counterparts. Here, we report [...] Read more.
An in-depth understanding of the reaction mechanism is required for the further development of Mo-based catalysts for biobased feedstocks. However, fundamental studies of industrial catalysts are challenging, and simplified systems are often used without direct comparison to their industrial counterparts. Here, we report on size-selected bimetallic NiMo nanoparticles as a candidate for a model catalyst that is directly compared to the industrial system to evaluate their industrial relevance. Both the nanoparticles and industrial supported NiMo catalysts were characterized using surface- and bulk-sensitive techniques. We found that the active Ni and Mo metals in the industrial catalyst are well dispersed and well mixed on the support, and that the interaction between Ni and Mo promotes the reduction of the Mo oxide. We successfully produced 25 nm NiMo alloyed nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. Characterization of the nanoparticles showed that they have a metallic core with a native oxide shell with a high potential for use as a model system for fundamental studies of hydrotreating catalysts for biobased feedstocks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Nanoparticles in Heterogeneous Catalysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Polarized Catalytic Polymer Nanofibers
Materials 2019, 12(18), 2859; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12182859 - 05 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Molecular scale modifications were achieved by spontaneous polarization which is favored in enhancements of β-crystallization phase inside polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers (NFs). These improvements were much more effective in nano and submicron fibers compared to fibers with relatively larger diameters. Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) [...] Read more.
Molecular scale modifications were achieved by spontaneous polarization which is favored in enhancements of β-crystallization phase inside polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers (NFs). These improvements were much more effective in nano and submicron fibers compared to fibers with relatively larger diameters. Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) supported by nanofibrous membranes opened new vistas in filtration, catalysis, and serving as most reliable resources in numerous other industrial applications. In this research, hydrogenation of phenol was studied as a model to test the effectiveness of polarized PVDF nanofiber support embedded with agglomerated palladium (Pd) metallic nanoparticle diameters ranging from 5–50 nm supported on polymeric PVDF NFs with ~200 nm in cross-sectional diameters. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and other analytical analysis revealed both molecular and surface morphological changes associated with polarization treatment. The results showed that the fibers mats heated to their curie temperature (150 °C) increased the catalytic activity and decreased the selectivity by yielding substantial amounts of undesired product (cyclohexanol) alongside with the desired product (cyclohexanone). Over 95% phenol conversion with excellent cyclohexanone selectivity was obtained less than nine hours of reaction using the polarized PVDF nanofibers as catalytic support structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Nanoparticles in Heterogeneous Catalysis)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Metal Nanoparticles as Green Catalysts
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3602; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213602 - 02 Nov 2019
Cited by 14
Abstract
Nanoparticles play a significant role in various fields ranging from electronics to composite materials development. Among them, metal nanoparticles have attracted much attention in recent decades due to their high surface area, selectivity, tunable morphologies, and remarkable catalytic activity. In this review, we [...] Read more.
Nanoparticles play a significant role in various fields ranging from electronics to composite materials development. Among them, metal nanoparticles have attracted much attention in recent decades due to their high surface area, selectivity, tunable morphologies, and remarkable catalytic activity. In this review, we discuss various possibilities for the synthesis of different metal nanoparticles; specifically, we address some of the green synthesis approaches. In the second part of the paper, we review the catalytic performance of the most commonly used metal nanoparticles and we explore a few roadblocks to the commercialization of the developed metal nanoparticles as efficient catalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Nanoparticles in Heterogeneous Catalysis)
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