Special Issue "Laser Ablation in the Synthesis of Novel Nanostructured Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Sergei A. Kulinich
Website
Guest Editor
Research Institute of Science and Technology, Tokai University, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292, Japan
Interests: Superhydrophobicity; hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces; ice-phobicity; anti-icing; hydrophilicity; laser ablation in liquid; nanomaterials and their characterization; thin films and coatings; anticorrosive coatings on aluminum; conversion coatings on aluminum; chemiresistive gas sensors; semiconductor nanoparticles
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, laser ablation in liquids is a very actively-used physical approach for the preparation of advanced nanomaterials, demonstrating advantages over conventional approaches, such as ease of use; control over composition, defects and morphology of the product; low precursor consumption and thus low impact on environment; and so on. For the last two decades, it has proved to be a universal and efficient technique to generate, fragment, modify and conjugate in situ diverse nanostructures based on metals, alloys, semiconductor, ceramics, carbon-based, hybrid, and organic materials. More recently, such unique laser-generated nanomaterials have been tested for various applications in photonics and optoelectronics, catalysis, sensing, pharmacy and biomedicine, and other fields. Therefore, this Special Issue welcomes contributions from all researchers working on nanostructures prepared (or modified) by laser beams in liquid phase, as well as on their characterization, properties, and applications.

Prof. Sergei A. Kulinich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Laser ablation in liquid phase
  • Laser fragmentation/melting in liquid phase
  • Laser-generated nanomaterials
  • Laser-modified nanomaterials
  • Nanoparticle preparation and characterization
  • Devices and applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Comparative Study of Physicochemical and Antibacterial Properties of ZnO Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation of Zn Target in Water and Air
Materials 2019, 12(1), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12010186 - 08 Jan 2019
Cited by 11
Abstract
Here, we report on ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) generated by nanosecond pulsed laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm) through ablation of metallic Zn target in water and air and their comparative analysis as potential nanomaterials for biomedical applications. The prepared nanomaterials were carefully characterized in terms [...] Read more.
Here, we report on ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) generated by nanosecond pulsed laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm) through ablation of metallic Zn target in water and air and their comparative analysis as potential nanomaterials for biomedical applications. The prepared nanomaterials were carefully characterized in terms of their structure, composition, morphology and defects. It was found that in addition to the main wurtzite ZnO phase, which is conventionally prepared and reported by others, the sample laser generated in air also contained some amount of monoclinic zinc hydroxynitrate. Both nanomaterials were then used to modify model wound dressings based on biodegradable poly l-lactic acid. The as-prepared model dressings were tested as biomedical materials with bactericidal properties towards S. aureus and E. coli strains. The advantages of the NPs prepared in air over their counterparts generated in water found in this work are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Ablation in the Synthesis of Novel Nanostructured Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Proliferation of Osteoblasts on Laser-Modified Nanostructured Titanium Surfaces
Materials 2018, 11(10), 1827; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11101827 - 26 Sep 2018
Cited by 8
Abstract
Nanostructured titanium has become a useful material for biomedical applications such as dental implants. Certain surface properties (grain size, roughness, wettability) are highly expected to promote cell adhesion and osseointegration. The aim of this study was to compare the biocompatibilities of several titanium [...] Read more.
Nanostructured titanium has become a useful material for biomedical applications such as dental implants. Certain surface properties (grain size, roughness, wettability) are highly expected to promote cell adhesion and osseointegration. The aim of this study was to compare the biocompatibilities of several titanium materials using human osteoblast cell line hFOB 1.19. Eight different types of specimens were examined: machined commercially pure grade 2 (cpTi2) and 4 (cpTi4) titanium, nanostructured titanium of the same grades (nTi2, nTi4), and corresponding specimens with laser-treated surfaces (cpTi2L, cpTi4L, nTi2L, nTi4L). Their surface topography was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness was measured using a mechanical contact profilometer. Specimens with laser-treated surfaces had significantly higher surface roughness. Wettability was measured by the drop contact angle method. Nanostructured samples had significantly higher wettability. Cell proliferation after 48 hours from plating was assessed by viability and proliferation assay. The highest proliferation of osteoblasts was found in nTi4 specimens. The analysis of cell proliferation revealed a difference between machined and laser-treated specimens. The mean proliferation was lower on the laser-treated titanium materials. Although plain laser treatment increases surface roughness and wettability, it does not seem to lead to improved biocompatibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Ablation in the Synthesis of Novel Nanostructured Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Spheroidization of Nickel Powder and Coating with Carbon Layer through Laser Heating
Materials 2018, 11(9), 1641; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11091641 - 07 Sep 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
We developed a simple and efficient process, laser heating of nickel powder in ethanol, to produce carbon-encapsulated nickel microspheres. Long-pulse-width laser heated nickel powder suspended in pure ethanol into liquid droplets. In turn, the latter droplets became sphere-like, pyrolyzed surrounding ethanol and dissolved [...] Read more.
We developed a simple and efficient process, laser heating of nickel powder in ethanol, to produce carbon-encapsulated nickel microspheres. Long-pulse-width laser heated nickel powder suspended in pure ethanol into liquid droplets. In turn, the latter droplets became sphere-like, pyrolyzed surrounding ethanol and dissolved the produced carbon atoms. Because of their lower solubility in solid nickel, excess carbon atoms were then expelled from the metal core after solidification, thus forming graphite-like shells on the laser-modified Ni spheres. Hence, after pyrolysis the transformation of carbon was found to follow the dissolution-precipitation mechanism. The produced carbon-encapsulated nickel microspheres exhibited higher oxidation resistance compared with the initial nickel powder, while keeping their magnetic properties essentially unchanged. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Ablation in the Synthesis of Novel Nanostructured Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Laser-Ablated ZnO Nanoparticles and Their Photocatalytic Activity toward Organic Pollutants
Materials 2018, 11(7), 1127; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11071127 - 03 Jul 2018
Cited by 13
Abstract
This work aimed to prepare nanostructures of ZnO with various lasers, testing them as photocatalysts, and comparing their morphology and activity in the degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous media. ZnO nanospheres (ns-ZnO) and ZnO nanorods (ms-ZnO) were prepared via the laser ablation [...] Read more.
This work aimed to prepare nanostructures of ZnO with various lasers, testing them as photocatalysts, and comparing their morphology and activity in the degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous media. ZnO nanospheres (ns-ZnO) and ZnO nanorods (ms-ZnO) were prepared via the laser ablation of a Zn metal plate in water using nanosecond- and millisecond-pulsed lasers, respectively. The obtained materials were characterized using a set of optical, structural, and surface-science techniques, such as UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Under visible-light irradiation, both nanostructures were found to be catalytically active toward the oxidation of methylene blue, which was used as a model compound. The ZnO nanorods fabricated with the millisecond laser showed better photocatalytic performance than their spherically shaped counterparts obtained by means of the nanosecond laser, which could be assigned to a larger number of defects on the ms-ZnO surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Ablation in the Synthesis of Novel Nanostructured Materials)
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Open AccessConcept Paper
Nanosecond-Laser Generation of Nanoparticles in Liquids: From Ablation through Bubble Dynamics to Nanoparticle Yield
Materials 2019, 12(4), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12040562 - 13 Feb 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
A comprehensive picture of the nanosecond-laser generation of colloidal nanoparticles in liquids is nowadays the demand of their high-throughput industrial fabrication for diverse perspective biomedical, material science, and optoelectronic applications. In this study, using silicon as an example, we present a self-consistent experimental [...] Read more.
A comprehensive picture of the nanosecond-laser generation of colloidal nanoparticles in liquids is nowadays the demand of their high-throughput industrial fabrication for diverse perspective biomedical, material science, and optoelectronic applications. In this study, using silicon as an example, we present a self-consistent experimental visualization and theoretical description of key transient stages during nanosecond-laser generation of colloidal nanoparticles in liquids: plasma-mediated injection of ablated mass into the liquid and driving the vapor bubble, finalized by the colloid appearance in the liquid. The explored fundamental transient stages envision the basic temporal and spatial scales, as well as laser parameter windows, for the demanded high-throughput nanosecond-laser generation of colloidal nanoparticles in liquids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Ablation in the Synthesis of Novel Nanostructured Materials)
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