Special Issue "High Entropy Materials: From Fundamentals to Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Nikita Stepanov Website E-Mail
Belgorod National Research University, Russia
Interests: high entropy alloys; alloy design; thermomechanical processing; microstructure; mechanical properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High entropy materials (HEMs) have recently become a major research topic in materials science. Although initial attention has been mostly focused on high entropy alloys, other types of HEMs, such as high entropy ceramics or high entropy coatings, are also explored now. HEMs are different from conventional materials in their complex, multicomponent chemical composition. It is believed that due to the complex compositions high entropy alloys, ceramics, and coatings can possess unique structures and properties, not readily available in conventional materials. Therefore they are considered as promising materials for a variety of demanding applications.

However, there are plenty of fundamental questions related to HEMs that not have been solved yet. For instance, the thermodynamics of HEMs is not completely understood at the moment, and thus the accurate prediction of phase formation is impossible. In addition, such phenomena, such as solid solution strengthening or diffusion, require additional studies. Meanwhile, for practical applications much better understanding of composition-structure-properties relationships in HEMs is required to select the most promising materials, their suitable fabrication methods and processing routes.

This Special Issue welcomes the original research and reviews on a variety of research topics concerning different types HEMs, including alloys, ceramics, and others. Papers on fundamental aspects of HEMs behavior and application-oriented research, experimental and theoretical articles are equally anticipated. I hope that this Special Issue will provide a valuable platform to share new findings and ideas in the HEMs field.

Dr. Nikita Stepanov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • high entropy materials
  • high entropy alloys
  • high entropy ceramics
  • high entropy coatings
  • phase formation
  • composition-structure-properties relationships

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Microstructure, Thermal, and Corrosion Behavior of the AlAgCuNiSnTi Equiatomic Multicomponent Alloy
Materials 2019, 12(6), 926; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12060926 - 20 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The paper presents the microstructure and corrosion behavior of an AlTiNiCuAgSn new equiatomic multicomponent alloy. The alloy was obtained using the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) technique in MRF-ABJ900 equipment. The microstructural analysis was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM microscope, SEM-EDS) [...] Read more.
The paper presents the microstructure and corrosion behavior of an AlTiNiCuAgSn new equiatomic multicomponent alloy. The alloy was obtained using the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) technique in MRF-ABJ900 equipment. The microstructural analysis was performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM microscope, SEM-EDS) and the phase transformations were highlighted by dilatometric analysis and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results show that the as-cast alloy microstructure is three-phase, with an average microhardness of 487 HV0.1/15. The obtained alloy could be included in the group of compositionally complex alloys (CCA). The corrosion resistance was studied using the potentiodynamic method in saline solution with 3.5% NaCl. Considering the high corrosion resistance, the obtained alloy can be used for surface coating applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Entropy Materials: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Deposition Temperature on the Phase Evolution of HfNbTiVZr High-Entropy Thin Films
Materials 2019, 12(4), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12040587 - 15 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this study, we show that the phase formation of HfNbTiVZr high-entropy thin films is strongly influenced by the substrate temperature. Films deposited at room temperature exhibit an amorphous microstructure and are 6.5 GPa hard. With increasing substrate temperature (room temperature to 275 [...] Read more.
In this study, we show that the phase formation of HfNbTiVZr high-entropy thin films is strongly influenced by the substrate temperature. Films deposited at room temperature exhibit an amorphous microstructure and are 6.5 GPa hard. With increasing substrate temperature (room temperature to 275 °C), a transition from an amorphous to a single-phased body-centred cubic (bcc) solid solution occurs, resulting in a hardness increase to 7.9 GPa. A higher deposition temperature (450 °C) leads to the formation of C14 or C15 Laves phase precipitates in the bcc matrix and a further enhancement of mechanical properties with a peak hardness value of 9.2 GPa. These results also show that thin films follow different phase formation pathways compared to HfNbTiVZr bulk alloys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Entropy Materials: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Oxidation Behavior of Refractory AlNbTiVZr0.25 High-Entropy Alloy
Materials 2018, 11(12), 2526; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11122526 - 12 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Oxidation behavior of a refractory AlNbTiVZr0.25 high-entropy alloy at 600–900 °C was investigated. At 600–700 °C, two-stage oxidation kinetics was found: Nearly parabolic oxidation (n = 0.46–0.48) at the first stage, transitioned to breakaway oxidation (n = 0.75–0.72) at the second stage. [...] Read more.
Oxidation behavior of a refractory AlNbTiVZr0.25 high-entropy alloy at 600–900 °C was investigated. At 600–700 °C, two-stage oxidation kinetics was found: Nearly parabolic oxidation (n = 0.46–0.48) at the first stage, transitioned to breakaway oxidation (n = 0.75–0.72) at the second stage. At 800 °C, the oxidation kinetics was nearly linear (n = 0.92) throughout the entire duration of testing. At 900 °C, the specimen disintegrated after 50 h of testing. The specific mass gains were estimated to be 7.2, 38.1, and 107.5, and 225.5 mg/cm2 at 600, 700, and 800 °C for 100 h, and 900 °C for 50 h, respectively. Phase compositions and morphology of the oxide scales were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was shown that the surface layer at 600 °C consisted of the V2O5, VO2, TiO2, Nb2O5, and TiNb2O7 oxides. Meanwhile, the scale at 900 °C comprised of complex TiNb2O7, AlNbO4, and Nb2Zr6O17 oxides. The oxidation mechanisms operating at different temperatures were discussed and a comparison of oxidation characteristics with the other alloys was conducted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Entropy Materials: From Fundamentals to Applications)
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