Special Issue "Damage, Fracture, and Fatigue of Metals"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Robert Eriksson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Solid Mechanics, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
Interests: fatigue; material characterization; life prediction; modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fatigue and fracture of metallic structural components cause problems in many industrial applications. Early fatigue research arose due to fatal accidents in the train and aircraft sectors and to avoid catastrophic failures through conservative designs. Today, research in damage, fracture, and fatigue often aims to reduce conservatism by increasing the accuracy of prediction models. This stresses a need to both understand damage mechanisms and to develop more advanced fatigue models.

Many aspects of damage, fracture, and fatigue remain unexplored. For example, the temperature and load history may influence the fatigue life and the fracture strength in unexpected ways. Damage mechanisms in metals are often complex and many examples exist where the exact damage mechanisms are not known. The role of mechanisms such as recrystallization, shift between transgranular and intergranular fracture, creep-fatigue interactions, hold time effects, and crack tip bluntening are still being investigated. Additionally, damage mechanisms in novel, recently introduced materials may differ from conventional materials. Lately, we have seen a rise of additively manufactured materials for which the damage mechanisms and fatigue properties are still relatively unexplored.

This Special Issue welcomes all contributions in the field of damage, fracture, and fatigue in metals but especially welcomes, e.g., damage mechanisms in advanced materials, the connection between damage mechanisms and mechanical properties, development of models of fatigue and fracture based on experimental findings, the role of crack closure, prediction methods including novel features, and the influence of temperature and load history.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Robert Eriksson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • damage characterization
  • temperature and load history
  • fatigue life prediction
  • new materials
  • mechanical properties
  • testing methods
  • reduced conservatism

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Fatigue Behaviors of a Medium-Carbon Pearlitic Wheel-Steel with Elongated Sulfides in High-Cycle and Very-High-Cycle Regimes
Materials 2021, 14(15), 4318; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14154318 - 02 Aug 2021
Viewed by 510
Abstract
The effects of stress ratio (R), loading condition, and MnS inclusion on the fatigue behavior of a medium-carbon pearlitic wheel-steel were investigated by a combination of rotating (frequency of 52.5 Hz, 103–108) bending and ultrasonic (frequency of [...] Read more.
The effects of stress ratio (R), loading condition, and MnS inclusion on the fatigue behavior of a medium-carbon pearlitic wheel-steel were investigated by a combination of rotating (frequency of 52.5 Hz, 103–108) bending and ultrasonic (frequency of 20 kHz, 5 × 104–109) axial cycling tests in high-cycle and very-high-cycle regimes. All the S-N curves present horizontal asymptotic shapes and have clear fatigue limits. The fatigue limits (260–270 MPa) for R = −1 obtained by ultrasonic test are almost 140–150 MPa lower than that (400–410 MPa) obtained by rotating bending, and the limit values of R = 0.3 are almost in the range of 195–205 MPa. For rotating bending, the fatigue fractures were originated from the surface matrix of the specimen. Whereas for ultrasonic fatigue, both surface and interior crack initiation occurred, and cracks were all initiated from MnS inclusions regardless of stress ratios. The finite element method was employed to study the influence of MnS inclusions on crack initiation and propagation. The results show that high stress concentrates on the sides of the elliptical MnS inclusion rather than the tip of the inclusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Damage, Fracture, and Fatigue of Metals)
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Article
Crack Propagation in As-Extruded and Heat-Treated Mg-Dy-Nd-Zn-Zr Alloy Explained by the Effect of LPSO Structures and Their Micro- and Nanohardness
Materials 2021, 14(13), 3686; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14133686 - 01 Jul 2021
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Abstract
The investigation of the crack propagation in as-extruded and heat-treated Mg-Dy-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy with a focus on the interaction of long-period stacking-ordered (LPSO) structures is the aim of this study. Solution heat treatment on a hot extruded Mg-Dy-Nd-Zn-Zr (RESOLOY®) was done to [...] Read more.
The investigation of the crack propagation in as-extruded and heat-treated Mg-Dy-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy with a focus on the interaction of long-period stacking-ordered (LPSO) structures is the aim of this study. Solution heat treatment on a hot extruded Mg-Dy-Nd-Zn-Zr (RESOLOY®) was done to change the initial fine-grained microstructure, consisting of grain boundary blocky LPSO and lamellar LPSO structures within the matrix, into coarser grains of less lamellar and blocky LPSO phases. C-ring compression tests in Ringer solution were used to cause a fracture. Crack initiation and propagation is influenced by twin boundaries and LPSO lamellae. The blocky LPSO phases also clearly hinder crack growth, by increasing the energy to pass either through the phase or along its interface. The microstructural features were characterized by micro- and nanohardness as well as the amount and location of LPSO phases in dependence on the heat treatment condition. By applying nanoindentation, blocky LPSO phases show a higher hardness than the grains with or without lamellar LPSO phases and their hardness decreases with heat treatment time. On the other hand, the matrix increases in hardness by solid solution strengthening. The microstructure consisting of a good balance of grain size, matrix and blocky LPSO phases and twins shows the highest fracture energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Damage, Fracture, and Fatigue of Metals)
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Article
Cyclic Plasticity and Low Cycle Fatigue of an AISI 316L Stainless Steel: Experimental Evaluation of Material Parameters for Durability Design
Materials 2021, 14(13), 3588; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14133588 - 27 Jun 2021
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Abstract
AISI 316L stainless steels are widely employed in applications where durability is crucial. For this reason, an accurate prediction of its behaviour is of paramount importance. In this work, the spotlight is on the cyclic response and low-cycle fatigue performance of this material, [...] Read more.
AISI 316L stainless steels are widely employed in applications where durability is crucial. For this reason, an accurate prediction of its behaviour is of paramount importance. In this work, the spotlight is on the cyclic response and low-cycle fatigue performance of this material, at room temperature. Particularly, the first aim of this work is to experimentally test this material and use the results as input to calibrate the parameters involved in a kinematic and isotropic nonlinear plasticity model (Chaboche and Voce). This procedure is conducted through a newly developed calibration procedure to minimise the parameter estimates errors. Experimental data are eventually used also to estimate the strain–life curve, namely the Manson–Coffin curve representing the 50% failure probability and, afterwards, the design strain–life curves (at 5% failure probability) obtained by four statistical methods (i.e., deterministic, “Equivalent Prediction Interval”, univariate tolerance interval, Owen’s tolerance interval for regression). Besides the characterisation of the AISI 316L stainless steel, the statistical methodology presented in this work appears to be an efficient tool for engineers dealing with durability problems as it allows one to select fatigue strength curves at various failure probabilities depending on the sought safety level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Damage, Fracture, and Fatigue of Metals)
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