Special Issue "Advances in Cement, Lime and Concrete"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Structure Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Záleská Martina
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Civil Engineering, Department of Materials Engineering and Chemistry, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: application of secondary raw materials in building industry; characterization of building materials; durability issues; eco-efficient of construction products; building chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Concrete and other cement-based composites are the most often used materials in the construction sector worldwide. On the construction market, several advanced cement-based products are available whose benefits have been widely demonstrated and are unquestionable. Recently, lime-based products have become popular, especially in repair and restoration of culture heritage buildings. However, despite the high level of knowledge achieved in the design, development, and manufacturing of advanced and multifunctional materials, there must be an invested effort in finding high-performance, sustainable, end eco-efficient construction materials that can compete or even surpass traditional concrete and lime- and cement-based composites applied today in construction practice. To achieve this, research on them and dissemination of their results is essential. This Special Issue is therefore dedicated to “Advances in Cement, Lime, and Concrete”, and it intends to welcome contributions on, but not limited to, the following subjects: eco-efficiency of the concrete and cement industry; advanced lime-, cement-, and blended binder-based composites; durability issues; waste to materials; alternative pozzolanic admixtures; fiber-reinforced composites; life cycle analysis; hygrothermal performance of building materials with respect to environmental exposure; and application of nano-additives in traditional building materials, repair mortars, and rendering and plastering materials.

Dr. Záleská Martina
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eco-efficiency of concrete and cement industry
  • advanced lime-, cement- and blended binder-based composites
  • durability issues
  • salt induced damage
  • green concrete
  • waste to materials
  • alternative pozzolanic admixtures
  • fiber-reinforced composites
  • application of nano-additives in traditional building materials, repair mortars, rendering and plastering materials.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Magnesium Oxychloride Cement Composites Lightened with Granulated Scrap Tires and Expanded Glass
Materials 2020, 13(21), 4828; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13214828 - 28 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 450
Abstract
In this paper, light burned magnesia dispersed in the magnesium chloride solution was used for the manufacturing of magnesium oxychloride cement-based composites which were lightened by granulated scrap tires and expanded glass. In a reference composite, silica sand was used only as filler. [...] Read more.
In this paper, light burned magnesia dispersed in the magnesium chloride solution was used for the manufacturing of magnesium oxychloride cement-based composites which were lightened by granulated scrap tires and expanded glass. In a reference composite, silica sand was used only as filler. In the lightened materials, granulated shredded tires were used as 100%, 90%, 80%, and 70% silica sand volumetric replacement. The rest was compensated by the addition of expanded glass granules. The filling materials were characterized by particle size distribution, specific density, dry powder density, and thermal properties that were analyzed for both loose and compacted aggregates. For the hardened air-cured samples, macrostructural parameters, mechanical properties, and hygric and thermal parameters were investigated. Specific attention was paid to the penetration of water and water-damage, which were considered as crucial durability parameters. Therefore, the compressive strength of samples retained after immersion for 24 h in water was tested and the water resistance coefficient was assessed. The use of processed waste rubber and expanded glass granulate enabled the development of lightweight materials with sufficient mechanical strength and stiffness, low permeability for water, enhanced thermal insulation properties, and durability in contact with water. These properties make the produced composites an interesting alternative to Portland cement-based materials. Moreover, the use of low-carbon binder and waste tires can be considered as an eco-efficient added value of these products which could improve the environmental impact of the construction industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cement, Lime and Concrete)
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