Special Issue "Design of Materials for Bone Tissue Scaffolds"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Antonio Boccaccio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Meccanica, Matematica e Management (DMMM), Politecnico di Bari, Via E. Orabona 4, 70126 Bari, Italy
Interests: bioengineering; morphological optimization of biomaterials; modeling and simulation of biomedical devices and mechanobiological processes; optical techniques for reverse engineering; characterization of biomedical materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent development of additive manufacturing techniques has allowed the building of regular scaffolds made from a very wide gamma of biocompatible materials and including complex and sophisticated geometries that can be optimized to increase the scaffold performance in terms of mechanical resistance and mechanobiological properties. This has made the design process of materials for bone tissue scaffolds an issue of crucial importance and the object of study of many researchers throughout the world. It is commonly known, in fact, that the rate of bone tissue regeneration and the cellular response is significantly influenced by the scaffold structural response that is, in turn, a function of the scaffold micro-architecture and of the mechanical properties of the material it is made from. The adhesion of stem cells to the scaffold surface as well as the tissue differentiation process occurring in the scaffold pores, are regulated by mechanobiological mechanisms taking place at both the micro- (i.e. some micrometers, approximately the dimension of a stem cell) and macro- (i.e. some hundreds of micrometers, the dimension of scaffold pores) level, respectively. The scaffold surface must be adequately structured to favor the adhesion of stem cells and their consequent differentiation. Similarly, the scaffold architecture must be properly shaped and the scaffold material must be adequately designed to trigger favorable biophysical stimuli, leading to the formation of the bony tissue.

Different studies have recently been published with the aim of better understanding the relationship between the scaffold geometry/material properties and the consequent mechanobiological phenomena taking place inside the scaffold during the regeneration process. However, no clear explanations are yet available on the relationship existing between the mechanical environment and the consequent biological response of tissues occupying the scaffold pores. This Special Issue will gather papers by materials scientists and bone tissue engineers focusing on (but not limited to):

- design techniques to optimize the scaffold performance;

- design of microstructured surfaces to favor the adhesion of stem cells;

- in vitro/in vivo studies aimed to establish relationships between the scaffold structural response and the tissue regeneration process;

- development of innovative biomaterials to fabricate scaffolds for bone tissue engineering;

- optimization of additively manufactured materials to increase scaffold performance;

- computational mechanobiological models simulating the tissue differentiation process in scaffolds.

Dr. Antonio Boccaccio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Geometry optimization of scaffolds
  • Micro-structured surfaces
  • Cell adhesion
  • Computational mechanobiology
  • Additively manufactured materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Lactoferrin-Hydroxyapatite Containing Spongy-Like Hydrogels for Bone Tissue Engineering
Materials 2019, 12(13), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12132074 - 27 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The development of bioactive and cell-responsive materials has fastened the field of bone tissue engineering. Gellan gum (GG) spongy-like hydrogels present high attractive properties for the tissue engineering field, especially due to their wide microarchitecture and tunable mechanical properties, as well as their [...] Read more.
The development of bioactive and cell-responsive materials has fastened the field of bone tissue engineering. Gellan gum (GG) spongy-like hydrogels present high attractive properties for the tissue engineering field, especially due to their wide microarchitecture and tunable mechanical properties, as well as their ability to entrap the responsive cells. Lactoferrin (Lf) and Hydroxyapatite (HAp) are bioactive factors that are known to potentiate faster bone regeneration. Thus, we developed an advanced three-dimensional (3D) biomaterial by integrating these bioactive factors within GG spongy-like hydrogels. Lf-HAp spongy-like hydrogels were characterized in terms of microstructure, water uptake, degradation, and concomitant release of Lf along the time. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were seeded and the capacity of these materials to support hASCs in culture for 21 days was assessed. Lf addition within GG spongy-like hydrogels did not change the main features of GG spongy-like hydrogels in terms of porosity, pore size, degradation, and water uptake commitment. Nevertheless, HAp addition promoted an increase of the pore wall thickness (from ~13 to 28 µm) and a decrease on porosity (from ~87% to 64%) and mean pore size (from ~12 to 20 µm), as well as on the degradability and water retention capabilities. A sustained release of Lf was observed for all the formulations up to 30 days. Cell viability assays showed that hASCs were viable during the culture period regarding cell-laden spongy-like hydrogels. Altogether, we demonstrate that GG spongy-like hydrogels containing HAp and Lf in high concentrations gathered favorable 3D bone-like microenvironment with an increased hASCs viability with the presented results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Materials for Bone Tissue Scaffolds)
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Open AccessArticle
In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Starfish Bone-Derived β-Tricalcium Phosphate as a Bone Substitute Material
Materials 2019, 12(11), 1881; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12111881 - 11 Jun 2019
Abstract
We evaluated starfish-derived β-tricalcium phosphate (Sf-TCP) obtained by phosphatization of starfish-bone-derived porous calcium carbonate as a potential bone substitute material. The Sf-TCP had a communicating pore structure with a pore size of approximately 10 μm. Although the porosity of Sf-TCP was similar to [...] Read more.
We evaluated starfish-derived β-tricalcium phosphate (Sf-TCP) obtained by phosphatization of starfish-bone-derived porous calcium carbonate as a potential bone substitute material. The Sf-TCP had a communicating pore structure with a pore size of approximately 10 μm. Although the porosity of Sf-TCP was similar to that of Cerasorb M (CM)—a commercially available β-TCP bone filler—the specific surface area was roughly three times larger than that of CM. Observation by scanning electron microscopy showed that pores communicated to the inside of the Sf-TCP. Cell growth tests showed that Sf-TCP improved cell proliferation compared with CM. Cells grown on Sf-TCP showed stretched filopodia and adhered; cells migrated both to the surface and into pores. In vivo, vigorous tissue invasion into pores was observed in Sf-TCP, and more fibrous tissue was observed for Sf-TCP than CM. Moreover, capillary formation into pores was observed for Sf-TCP. Thus, Sf-TCP showed excellent biocompatibility in vitro and more vigorous bone formation in vivo, indicating the possible applications of this material as a bone substitute. In addition, our findings suggested that mimicking the microstructure derived from whole organisms may facilitate the development of superior artificial bone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design of Materials for Bone Tissue Scaffolds)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Lactoferrin-Hydroxyapatite Containing Spongy-like Hydrogels for Bone Tissue Engineering

Ana Raquel Bastos1,2, Lucília Pereira da Silva1,2, Fátima Raquel Maia1,2,3, Tânia Rodrigues1,2, Filipa Sousa1,2, Joaquim Miguel Oliveira1,2,3, Jillian Cornish4, Vitor Manuel Correlo1,2,3 and Rui Luís Reis1,2,3

13B's Research Group, I3Bs – Research Institute on Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics,  University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, Parque de Ciência e Tecnologia, Zona Industrial da Gandra, 4805-017 Barco, Guimarães, Portugal;

2ICVS/3B’s - PT Government Associated Laboratory, Portugal;

3The Discoveries Centre for Regenerative and Precision Medicine, Headquarters at University of Minho, Avepark, 4805-017 Barco, Guimarães, Portugal;

4Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

2. Novel titanium-based scaffolds in bone regeneration: types and application

Maja Antunovic, Maja Pusić, Slaven Babic, Katarina Caput Mihalic and Inga Marijanovic *.

Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb; Traumatology Clinic, Clinical Hospital Centre “Sestre Milosrdnice”, Zagreb.

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