Special Issue "Latest Advancements in the Development of a Sustainable and Carbon-Neutral Concrete and Pavement"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rajeev Roychand
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Infrastructure Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia
Interests: eco-friendly cement and concrete; sustainability and circular economy in construction; cement composites; cement chemistry; carbon sequestration; carbon mineralization in concrete; concrete durability; recycling of industrial by-products and waste materials in concrete; additives and admixtures for concrete
Dr. Souradeep Gupta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Sustainable Technologies, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012, India
Interests: construction building materials; building construction materials; concrete technologies; concrete durability sustainable construction; concrete material technology; carbon sequestration construction technology
Dr. Mohammad Saberian Boroujeni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Infrastructure Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
Interests: geotechnics; geomaterials; pavements; soil dynamics; tailings; earthworks; slope stability; soil stabilizations; foundations; binders and geopolymers; unbound granular aggregates, construction and demolition waste (CDW); recycled waste materials; applications of waste materials in geotechnical engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change brought about by greenhouse gas emissions is a significant challenge facing our planet. The cement industry is one of the major producers of greenhouse gases, accounting for about 5–7% of the global greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, the continuous mining of valuable natural resources by the cement and concrete industry to meet the ever-increasing global demand for infrastructure development makes it a long-term sustainability challenge. Therefore, the research and development on cutting down its carbon footprint and transforming it into a carbon-neutral and sustainable material have been subject to extensive and sustained focus. The conservation of natural resources and the recycling of waste materials have become active components of this transformation process that simultaneously supports the global interest in the closed-loop circular economy. Various advancements have been made in developing eco-friendly cement concrete that is becoming more sustainable and proactively supporting the circular economy. Also, pavement technology and soil stabilization processes have been moving towards adopting sustainable approaches and materials.

This Special Issue focuses on novel and fundamental research that paves a way towards developing carbon-neutral and sustainable cement concrete that also encourages the recycling of various waste streams.

The potential topics of interest for this special issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Carbon dioxide curing and mineralization in cement concrete
  • Carbon sequestration from various waste streams in cement concrete
  • Development of zero cement composites
  • Development of low carbon footprint cement composites and pavements
  • Recycling of various waste materials for the replacement of cement and/or aggregates
  • Physicochemical and microstructure studies of the blended cement/concrete composites
  • Impact on indoor air quality, fire resistance, thermal insulation, and acoustic properties.
  • Long-term mechanical and durability studies
  • Development of low carbon footprint pavements
  • Soil stabilization using sustainable materials

Dr. Rajeev Roychand
Dr. Souradeep Gupta
Dr. Mohammad Saberian Boroujeni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon dioxide curing
  • carbon dioxide mineralization
  • carbon sequestration
  • supplementary cementitious materials
  • zero cement composites
  • biochar
  • sustainability
  • waste recycling
  • sustainable pavements
  • low carbon footprint soil stabilization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Design of High Volume CFBC Fly Ash Based Calcium Sulphoaluminate Type Binder in Mixtures with Ordinary Portland Cement
Materials 2021, 14(19), 5798; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14195798 - 03 Oct 2021
Viewed by 432
Abstract
Growing concerns on global industrial greenhouse gas emissions have boosted research for developing alternative, less CO2 intensive binders for partial to complete replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) clinker. Unlike slag and pozzolanic siliceous low-Ca class F fly ashes, the Ca- and [...] Read more.
Growing concerns on global industrial greenhouse gas emissions have boosted research for developing alternative, less CO2 intensive binders for partial to complete replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) clinker. Unlike slag and pozzolanic siliceous low-Ca class F fly ashes, the Ca- and S-rich class C ashes, particularly these formed in circulating fluidised bed combustion (CFBC) boilers, are typically not considered as viable cementitious materials for blending with or substituting the OPC. We studied the physical, chemical-mineralogical characteristics of the mechanically activated Ca-rich CFBC fly ash pastes and mortars with high volume OPC substitution rates to find potential alternatives for OPC in building materials and composites. Our findings indicate that compressive strength of pastes and mortars made with partial to complete replacement of the mechanically activated CFBC ash to OPC is comparable to OPC concrete, showing compared to OPC pastes reduction in compressive strength only by <10% at 50% and <20% at 75% replacement rates. Our results show that mechanically activated Ca-rich CFBC fly ash can be successfully used as an alternative CSA-cement type binder. Full article
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Article
Novel Approach to the Treatment of Gypseous Soil-Induced Ettringite Using Blends of Non-Calcium-Based Stabilizer, Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag, and Metakaolin
Materials 2021, 14(18), 5198; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14185198 - 10 Sep 2021
Viewed by 405
Abstract
Gypseous soil is one type of expansive soil that contains a sufficient amount of sulphate. Cement and lime are the most common methods of stabilizing expansive soil, but the problem is that lime-treated gypseous soil normally fails in terms of durability due to [...] Read more.
Gypseous soil is one type of expansive soil that contains a sufficient amount of sulphate. Cement and lime are the most common methods of stabilizing expansive soil, but the problem is that lime-treated gypseous soil normally fails in terms of durability due to the formation of ettringite, a highly deleterious compound. Moisture ingress causes a significant swelling of ettringite crystals, thereby causing considerable damage to structures and pavements. This study investigated the suitability of various materials (nano–Mg oxide (M), metakaolin (MK), and ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS)) for the stabilization of gypseous soil. The results showed soil samples treated with 20% M-MK, M-GGBS, and M-GGBS-MK to exhibit lower swelling rates (<0.01% change in volume) compared to those treated with 10% and 20% of lime after 90 days of curing. However, soil samples stabilized with 10% and 20% binder of [(M-MK), (M-GGBS), and (M-GGBS-MK)] exhibited higher strengths after 90 days of soaking (ranging from 0.96–12.8 MPa) compared to those stabilized with 10% and 20% lime. From the morphology studies, the SEM and EDX analysis evidenced no formation of ettringite in the samples stabilized with M-MK-, M-GGBS-, and M-GGBS-MK. These results demonstrate the suitability of M-MK, M-GGBS, and M-GGBS-MK as effective agents for the stabilization of gypseous soil. Full article
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