Special Issue "Intermetallics—Current Research and Applications"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Pawel Jozwik
Website
Guest Editor
Military University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: intermetallic alloys, nanostructured materials, cold work, microstructure characterization, recovery and recrystallisation process, catalytic activity, carbon nanofiber formation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The continuous development of civilization is limited by the availability of materials with specific and controlled properties. It is expected that in this group of future materials, the usefulness of alloys based on intermetallic phases will finally be confirmed. These materials have a relatively high melting point and high strength, but this unfortunately comes with insufficient ductility.

Although work on these materials started already in the previous century (mainly in the field of Ni–Al, Fe–Al, and Ti–Al balance systems), they are still seen as perspective materials. The indicated group is gradually expanded with new materials, for example, for the following systems: Mo–Si, Nb–Si, Ti–Si, Ni–Sn, Cu-Sn, Pt-Sn and Pt-Al.

Given the abovementioned special properties of these materials, their suitability in a wide range of practical applications is tested, including structural materials (in aerospace and automotive engines as well as in nuclear power plants) multifunctional materials (including MEMS and MECS elements), and functional materials (e.g., catalytically active systems in the field of chemical decomposition and combustion of harmful substances). There are also works aimed at improving the processing technology of intermetallic alloys, including additive manufacturing of construction elements with mass, porous or graded structure.

The aim of the current Special Issue is to collect the recent research and advances, particularly on microstructures and various types of properties of a wide range of intermetallics. Original research papers, state-of-the-art reviews, and discussions are welcome.

Dr. Pawel Jozwik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Intermetallic phases and alloys
  • Ductility of intermetallic alloys
  • Nano- and ultra-fine-grained intermetallics
  • Multifunctional intermetallic materials
  • Thermal stability of intermetallic structure and properties
  • Catalytic activity of intermetallic phases
  • Intermetallic materials fabricated by additive manufacturing methods
  • Applied research on intermetallics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Direct Synthesis of Fe-Al Alloys from Elemental Powders Using Laser Engineered Net Shaping
Materials 2020, 13(3), 531; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030531 - 22 Jan 2020
Abstract
The laser engineered net shaping (LENS®) process is shown here as an alternative to melting, casting, and powder metallurgy for manufacturing iron aluminides. This technique was found to allow for the production of FeAl and Fe3Al phases from mixtures of elemental [...] Read more.
The laser engineered net shaping (LENS®) process is shown here as an alternative to melting, casting, and powder metallurgy for manufacturing iron aluminides. This technique was found to allow for the production of FeAl and Fe3Al phases from mixtures of elemental iron and aluminum powders. The in situ synthesis reduces the manufacturing cost and enhances the manufacturing efficiency due to the control of the chemical and phase composition of the deposited layers. The research was carried out on samples with different chemical compositions that were deposited on the intermetallic substrates that were produced by powder metallurgy. The obtained samples with the desired phase composition illustrated that LENS® technology can be successfully applied to alloys synthesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intermetallics—Current Research and Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Microstructure of Coatings on Nickel and Steel Platelets Obtained by Co-Milling with NiAl and CrB2 Powders
Materials 2019, 12(16), 2593; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12162593 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
Metal matrix composite coatings are developed to protect parts made from materials susceptible to wear, like nickel alloys or stainless steel. The industry-established deposition method is presently an atmospheric plasma spraying method since it allows the production of both well-adhering and thick coatings. [...] Read more.
Metal matrix composite coatings are developed to protect parts made from materials susceptible to wear, like nickel alloys or stainless steel. The industry-established deposition method is presently an atmospheric plasma spraying method since it allows the production of both well-adhering and thick coatings. Alternatively, similar coatings could be produced by co-milling of ceramic and alloyed powders together with metallic plates serving as substrates. It results in mechanical embedding of the powder particles into exposed metallic surfaces required coatings. The present experiment was aimed at the analysis of microstructure of such coatings obtained using NiAl and CrB2 powders. They were loaded together with nickel and stainless steel platelets into ball mill vials and rotated at 350 rpm for up to 32 h. This helped to produce coatings of a thickness up to ~40 µm. The optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy observations of the coatings led to conclusion that the higher the rotation speed of vials, the wider the intermixing zone between the coating and the substrate. Simultaneously, it was established that the total thickness of the coating deposited at specified conditions is limited by the brittleness of its nanocrystalline matrix. An increase in the hardness of the substrate results in a decrease of the intermixing zone. The above results indicate that even as the method based on mechanical embedding could so far produce thinner coatings than the plasma spraying, in the former case they are characterized by a more uniform nanocrystalline matrix with homogenously distributed fine ceramic particles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intermetallics—Current Research and Applications)
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