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Special Issue "Advancement of Deformation Mechanisms in High-Entropy Alloys"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2023 | Viewed by 1677

Special Issue Editor

Center of Advanced Lubrication and Seal Materials, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, China
Interests: high-performance steel design; microstructure and properties control; high entropy alloy; wear damage evaluation at extreme environments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

High-entropy alloys (HEAs), also known as multiprincipal element alloys (MPEAs) or complex concentrated alloys (CCAs), are a new class of materials developed based on “chemical disorder”, which breaks the limitations of only one or two principal elements in traditional materials. HEAs are expected to act as competitive candidates of structural materials in industrial, aerospace, and biomedical applications. To promote their wide engineering applications, it is desirable to improve the strength of the alloys while retaining a good ductility. To date, as a structural material with excellent performance, HEAs have not been applied in large-scale industrialization yet. The main reasons are as follows: (i) Most HEAs find it difficult to balance plasticity and strength. For example, face-centered cubic (FCC) HEAs have good elongation but low strength, while body-centered cubic (BCC) HEAs show high strength but poor ductility; although hexagonal close-packed (HCP) HEAs can be used as magnetic functional alloys, the research on mechanical properties of the HCP-structured HEAs is still in its infancy. (ii) Moreover, the poor fluidity, castability, and composition segregation of HEAs are also important factors affecting technical applications. (iii) The costs of raw materials, preparation, and recovery of HEAs are normally expensive compared with those of Al alloys, Ti alloys, steels, and other traditional alloys. Therefore, HEAs must overcome the abovementioned drawbacks and achieve an optimal combination of high strength and good plasticity.

This Special Issue will cover new findings in the field of the strengthening and toughening of HEAs, including FCC HEAs, BCC HEAs, dual-phase HEAs and refractory HEAs. Manuscripts describing new experimental and theoretical studies on these fields are highly welcome in this issue.

Dr. Xiaolin Li
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • high-entropy alloy
  • microstructure
  • mechanical properties
  • deformation mechanism
  • dual-phase
  • phase transformation
  • deformation twinning
  • interstitial atoms
  • precipitates

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Manufacturing of Metal–Diamond Composites with High-Strength CoCrCuxFeNi High-Entropy Alloy Used as a Binder
Materials 2023, 16(3), 1285; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16031285 - 02 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 571
Abstract
This paper focuses on the study of the structure and mechanical properties of CoCrCuxFeNi high-entropy alloys and their adhesion to single diamond crystals. CoCrCuxFeNi alloys were manufactured by the powder metallurgy route, specifically via mechanical alloying of elemental powders, [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on the study of the structure and mechanical properties of CoCrCuxFeNi high-entropy alloys and their adhesion to single diamond crystals. CoCrCuxFeNi alloys were manufactured by the powder metallurgy route, specifically via mechanical alloying of elemental powders, followed by hot pressing. The addition of copper led to the formation of a dual-phase FCC + FCC2 structure. The CoCrCu0.5FeNi alloy exhibited the highest ultimate tensile strength (1080 MPa). Reductions in the ductility of the CoCrCuxFeNi HEAs and the tendency for brittle fracture behavior were observed at high copper concentrations. The equiatomic alloys CoCrFeNi and CoCrCuFeNi demonstrated high adhesion strength to single diamond crystals. The diamond surface at the fracture of the composites having the CoCrFeNi matrix had chromium-rich metal matrix regions, thus indicating that chromium carbide, responsible for adhesion, was formed at the composite–diamond interface. Copper-rich areas were detected on the diamond surface within the composites having the CoCrCuFeNi matrix due to the predominant precipitation of the FCC2 phase at the interfaces or the crack propagation along the FCC/FCC2 interface, resulting in the exposure of the Cu-rich FCC2 phase on the surface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancement of Deformation Mechanisms in High-Entropy Alloys)
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Article
A Systematical Evaluation of the Crystallographic Orientation Relationship between MC Precipitates and Ferrite Matrix in HSLA Steels
Materials 2022, 15(11), 3967; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15113967 - 02 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 736
Abstract
Here we systematically investigate the crystallographic orientation relationship (OR) between MC-type precipitates (M, metal; C, carbon) and ferrite matrix in the Ti-Mo microalloyed steel with different processing. In the specimens without austenite deformation, the interphase precipitation can be obtained, and the precipitates obey [...] Read more.
Here we systematically investigate the crystallographic orientation relationship (OR) between MC-type precipitates (M, metal; C, carbon) and ferrite matrix in the Ti-Mo microalloyed steel with different processing. In the specimens without austenite deformation, the interphase precipitation can be obtained, and the precipitates obey Baker–Nutting (BN) OR with ferrite matrix. By contrast, in the specimens with austenite deformation, the supersaturated precipitates were formed in ferrite grains, which can obey BN, Nishiyama–Wasserman (NW), Kurdjumov–Sachs (KS) and Pitsch (P) ORs simultaneously. The cooling rate after austenite deformation can influence the OR between carbides and ferrite in the MC/ferrite system. At the cooling rate of 80 °C/s, carbides and ferrite can roughly satisfy these OR with the deviation ≥ 10°, while at the cooling rate of 20 °C/s, carbides and ferrite can strictly obey the specific OR. The energy accumulated in the deformation process and maintained in the fast-cooling process (80 °C/s) can offset the formation energy of the carbides. Thus, the carbides formed in the specimen with the cooling rate of 80 °C/s do not strictly satisfy the specific ORs to meet the rule of lowest energy, and then deviate by a small angle based on the specific ORs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancement of Deformation Mechanisms in High-Entropy Alloys)
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