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Advances in Service Life Evaluation of Metallic and Composite Materials

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2024) | Viewed by 4466

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, School of Architecture and Environment, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, China
Interests: structural fatigue; steel structures; fracture mechanics and crack growth; bolted connection; thin-walled structures; composite structures; structural analysis; finite element modelling

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nagoya University, C1-3(651) Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya-City, Aichi 464-8603, Japan
Interests: fatigue life; fracture mechanics; welded joints; bolted joints; ultra-low cycle fatigue; fatigue strength improvement; welding toe treatment; local stress method; retrofit and repair

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metallic and composite materials always play important roles in advanced techniques for maintaining desired function and freedom in structural design. Metallic and composite materials should be developed to fulfil the intended levels of safety, serviceability, and durability, as well as the ability to not only withstand the stresses provided for them but also attain sufficient service life in the global analysis of the structures. However, the degradation of metallic and composite materials, such as structural deterioration or failure induced by aging, inevitably exists when the discontinuity of rigidity and stress concentration at either the material level or structure level make it ready to initiate and propagate fatigue cracks. Facing escalating costs for newly built infrastructures and economic downturn, the ways to extend the life of the existing structures well beyond their intended design life have become an increasing concern in the engineering community. To this purpose, sustainable structures have witnessed considerable progress from external mechanical strengthening to recent surface treatment and fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) laminate alternatives. This aspect is of particular interest to researchers in civil, mechanical, and aeronautical engineering involved in metallic and composite materials related to experimental techniques, fracture mechanics, and fatigue assessment.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to gather the updated advances in service life evaluations of metallic and composite materials as key parts of making structures with desired reliability and durability. The loading scenarios include high-cycle fatigue, low-cycle fatigue, post-fatigue, etc. Contributions of primary interest in the following topics are accepted: recent developments about the experimental techniques applied to the estimation of fatigue crack growth rate and deterioration progress; the current state of knowledge relating to geometric effects (notches, fillets, etc.), environmental and physical factors on the progressive lifetime deterioration of metallic and composite materials based on theoretical and numerical approaches, and finally the methodology of the suppression of fatigue crack growth and optimization of fatigue-resistant structures. However, studies related to any other engineering materials and structures employed in fatigue approaches, fracture mechanics, and experimental techniques are also well fitted with the aim and scope of this Special Issue.

Dr. Zhi-Yu Wang
Dr. Takeshi Hanji
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • high-cycle fatigue
  • low-cycle fatigue
  • ultra-low cycle fatigue
  • post-fatigue examination
  • fatigue crack growth
  • three-dimensional shape measurement
  • fatigue life assessment and extension
  • fatigue strength improvement
  • repair and retrofitting
  • in-plane bending and out-of-plane bending
  • theoretical and numerical approaches
  • progressive damage
  • hot spot stress, residual stress
  • surface treatment
  • fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) laminate

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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23 pages, 13364 KiB  
Article
Development of a Unified Specimen for Adhesive Characterization—Part 2: Experimental Study on the Mode I (mDCB) and II (ELS) Fracture Components
by Daniel S. Correia, Inês D. Costa, Eduardo A. S. Marques, Ricardo J. C. Carbas and Lucas F. M. da Silva
Materials 2024, 17(5), 1049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17051049 - 24 Feb 2024
Viewed by 634
Abstract
Adhesive bonding has been increasingly employed in multiple industrial applications. This has led to a large industrial demand for faster, simpler, and cheaper characterization methods that allow engineers to predict the mechanical behavior of an adhesive with numerical models. Currently, these characterization processes [...] Read more.
Adhesive bonding has been increasingly employed in multiple industrial applications. This has led to a large industrial demand for faster, simpler, and cheaper characterization methods that allow engineers to predict the mechanical behavior of an adhesive with numerical models. Currently, these characterization processes feature a wide variety of distinct standards, specimen configurations, and testing procedures and require deep knowhow of complex data-reduction schemes. By suggesting the creation of a new and integrated experimental tool for adhesive characterization, it becomes possible to address this problem in a faster and unified manner. In this work, following a previous numerical study, the mode I and II components of fracture-toughness characterization were validated experimentally in two different configurations, Balanced and Unbalanced. For mode I, it was demonstrated that both configurations presented similar numerical and experimental R-curves. The relative error against standard tests was lower than ±5% for the Balanced specimen; the Unbalanced system showed higher variations, which were predicted by the numerical results. Under mode II, the Balanced specimen displayed plastic deformation due to high deflections. On the contrary, the Unbalanced specimen did not show this effect and presented a relative error of approximately ±2%. Nonetheless, it was proven that this approach to obtain such data by using a single unified specimen is still feasible but needs further development to obtain with similar precision of standard tests. In the end, a conceptual change is proposed to solve the current mode II issues. Full article
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Review

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41 pages, 12583 KiB  
Review
Enhancing Fatigue Life and Strength of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints: A Comprehensive Review
by Hossein Malekinejad, Ricardo J. C. Carbas, Alireza Akhavan-Safar, Eduardo A. S. Marques, Fernando Castro Sousa and Lucas F. M. da Silva
Materials 2023, 16(19), 6468; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16196468 - 28 Sep 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3190
Abstract
Adhesive bonding is widely seen as the most optimal method for joining composite materials, bringing significant benefits over mechanical joining, such as lower weight and reduced stress concentrations. Adhesively bonded composite joints find extensive applications where cyclic fatigue loading takes place, but this [...] Read more.
Adhesive bonding is widely seen as the most optimal method for joining composite materials, bringing significant benefits over mechanical joining, such as lower weight and reduced stress concentrations. Adhesively bonded composite joints find extensive applications where cyclic fatigue loading takes place, but this might ultimately lead to crack damage and safety issues. Consequently, it has become essential to study how these structures behave under fatigue loads and identify the remaining gaps in knowledge to give insights into new possibilities. The fatigue life of adhesively bonded composite joints is influenced by various parameters, including joint configuration and material properties of adherends and adhesive. Numerous studies with varying outcomes have been documented in the literature. However, due to the multitude of influential factors, deriving conclusive insights from these studies for practical design purposes has proven to be challenging. Hence, this review aims to address this challenge by discussing different methods to enhance the fatigue performance of adhesively bonded composite joints. Additionally, it provides a comprehensive overview of the existing literature on adhesively bonded composite joints under cyclic fatigue loading, focusing on three main aspects: Adherends modification, adhesive modification, and joint configurations. Since the effect of modifying the adhesive, adherends, and joint configurations on fatigue performance has not been comprehensively studied in the literature, this review aims to fill this gap by compiling and comparing the relevant experimental data. Furthermore, this review discusses the challenges and limitations associated with the methods that can be used to monitor the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. Full article
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