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Bio-Based Materials from Wood and Other Lignocellulosic Materials: Development, Properties and Design

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 1896

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Thünen Institute of Wood Research, Hamburg, Germany
Interests: wood quality; wood durability; wood modification; wood protection; service life prediction; structural health assessment; performance classification
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Latvian State Institute of Wood Chemistry, Dzerbenes str. 27, LV-1006 Riga, Latvia
Interests: mycelium biocomposites; biopolymers from natural fibres; microbial degradation of wood; microscopy of wood structure and microorganisms; fungal diversity in wooden constructions; biological durability of treated wood and wood based products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of renewable energies and the resource-saving use of renewable raw materials are the key to climate-friendly strategies in almost all areas of life. Bio-based materials play a central role in this context. They can be used in many areas and thus contribute to increased carbon storage. In addition to products made from solid wood or bamboo, a variety of other materials can be produced based on lignocelluloses, which are characterized by unique properties and possible applications.

The Special Issue aims to cover all the aspects related to recent innovations in bio-based materials made from wood and other lingo-celluloses such as bamboo, rattan, miscanthus, straw, hemp, sea grass, and many others more. These materials' development, physico-mechanical, chemical, biological properties and design are appreciated. Besides, contributions analysing the effect of the inclusion of other natural biopolymers in composite materials are welcome.

Finally, we would like to emphasise that this Special Issue is widely inclusive, so we expect many works to fall within its scope. Therefore, we are pleased to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, case studies and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Christian Brischke
Prof. Dr. Miha Humar
Dr. Ilze Irbe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bio-composites
  • biological durability
  • forestry by products
  • life cycle assessment
  • mycelium composites, performance
  • wood composites

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3364 KiB  
Article
Preparation of Filter Paper from Bamboo and Investigating the Effect of Additives
by Zahra Kazemi Karchangi, Noureddin Nazarnezhad, Jalel Labidi and Seyed Hassan Sharifi
Materials 2024, 17(9), 1977; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17091977 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 531
Abstract
As air pollution escalates, the need for air filters increases. It is better that the filters used be based on natural fibers, such as non-wood fibers, which cause low damage to the environment. However, the short fiber lengths, low apparent densities, and high [...] Read more.
As air pollution escalates, the need for air filters increases. It is better that the filters used be based on natural fibers, such as non-wood fibers, which cause low damage to the environment. However, the short fiber lengths, low apparent densities, and high volumes of non-wood materials can make it challenging to prepare filter paper with the required mechanical and physical properties. In that context, this study focused on utilizing bamboo fibers to fabricate filter paper by employing the anthraquinone soda pulping method. The pulp underwent bleaching and oxidation processes, with the incorporation of cationic starch (CS) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to enhance resistance properties, resulting in the creation of handmade filter papers. The findings revealed that the tear, burst, and tensile strength of filter paper increased with the oxidation and addition of CS and PVA. Air permeability increased with addition of PVA and combination of CS and PVA. FTIR demonstrated the conversion of hydroxyl groups in cellulose chains to carboxyl groups due to oxidation. SEM images illustrated alterations in the fiber structure post-oxidation treatment, with CS reducing pores while PVA and the CS-PVA combination enlarged pore size and enhanced porosity. The BET surface area surface area expanded with oxidation and the addition of the CS-PVA blend, indicating heightened filter paper porosity. Notably, the combined inclusion of CS and PVA not only augmented mechanical strength but also increased porosity while maintaining pore size. Full article
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15 pages, 3126 KiB  
Article
Preparation of Wheat Straw Hot-Pressed Board through Coupled Dilute Acid Pretreatment and Surface Modification
by Jianing Wang, Libo Zhang, Yepeng Xiao, Qinzhen Fan, Chong Yang, Yiqiang Deng, Hao Lu and Lihua Cheng
Materials 2024, 17(9), 1950; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17091950 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 436
Abstract
The production of wheat straw waste board materials encounters challenges, including inadequate inherent adhesiveness and the utilization of environmentally harmful adhesives. Employing a hot-pressed method for converting wheat straw into board materials represents a positive stride towards the resourceful utilization of agricultural wastes. [...] Read more.
The production of wheat straw waste board materials encounters challenges, including inadequate inherent adhesiveness and the utilization of environmentally harmful adhesives. Employing a hot-pressed method for converting wheat straw into board materials represents a positive stride towards the resourceful utilization of agricultural wastes. This study primarily focuses on examining the influence of hot-pressing process conditions on the mechanical properties of wheat straw board materials pretreated with dilute acid. Additionally, it assesses the necessity of dilute acid treatment and optimizes the hot-pressing conditions to achieve optimal results at 15 MPa, 2 h, and 160 °C. Furthermore, a comprehensive process is developed for preparing wheat straw hot-pressed board materials by combining dilute acid pretreatment with surface modification treatments, such as glutaraldehyde, citric acid, and rosin. Finally, a thorough characterization of the mechanical properties of the prepared board materials is conducted. The results indicate a substantial improvement in tensile strength across all modified wheat straw board materials compared to untreated ones. Notably, boards treated with glutaraldehyde exhibited the most significant enhancement, achieving a tensile strength of 463 kPa, bending strength of 833 kPa, and a water absorption rate of 14.14%. This study demonstrates that combining dilute acid pretreatment with surface modification treatments effectively enhances the performance of wheat straw board materials, offering a sustainable alternative to traditional wood-based board materials. Full article
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16 pages, 664 KiB  
Article
Chemical Composition and Mechanical Properties of Wood after Thermal Modification in Closed Process under Pressure in Nitrogen
by Juris Grinins, Guntis Sosins, Prans Brazdausks and Janis Zicans
Materials 2024, 17(7), 1468; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17071468 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 607
Abstract
In this study, silver birch (Betula pendula) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood planks (1000 × 100 × 25 mm) were thermally modified in pilot-scale equipment. Research extended our knowledge of the thermal modification (TM) process in a closed [...] Read more.
In this study, silver birch (Betula pendula) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood planks (1000 × 100 × 25 mm) were thermally modified in pilot-scale equipment. Research extended our knowledge of the thermal modification (TM) process in a closed system under nitrogen pressure, as well as how process parameters affect the chemical composition and mechanical strength of wood. Various TM regimes were selected—maximum temperature (150–180 °C), modification time (30–180 min), and initial nitrogen pressure (3–6 bar). Chemical analyses were performed to assess the amount of extractives, lignin, polysaccharides and acetyl group content following the TM process. The mechanical properties of TM wood were characterized using the modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), and Brinell hardness. The MOR of both studied wood species following TM in nitrogen was reduced, but MOE changes were insignificant. The Brinell hardness of TM birch wood’s tangential surface was much higher than that of the radial surface, although Scots pine wood showed the opposite pattern. TM birch and pine wood specimens with the highest mass loss, acetone soluble extractive amount, and the lowest xylan and acetyl group content had the lowest MOR and Brinell hardness. Full article
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