Special Issue "Fabrication of 1D and 2D Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daniel Sunghoi Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Interests: III-V nanomaterials; energy storage materials; carbon nanotubes; new carbon nanomaterials; nanocomposites; meta-materials
Prof. Dr. Stefan Strauf
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Stevens Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Hoboken, United States
Interests: nanophotonics; nanoelectronics; nanostructured devices; sensing, and information processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Low-dimensional material systems is a rapidly evolving area of science and engineering that promises to create new techniques to manufacture devices and develop advanced technology. Novel nanofabrication is fundamentally changing the way materials and devices will be produced and will be central to the next era of technology. The capability of developing processes for the fabrication of materials at the nanometer-scale and applying their unique properties to device applications will have a tremendous impact on nanotechnology, industry and society. In spite of a number of advantages and the outstanding properties of low-dimensional materials such as one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, the scalable fabrication of 1D and 2D nanomaterials is still a challenging research topic in terms of fabrication cost, the quality of the product and manufacturability.

We would like to invite you to contribute to a Special Issue of Materials dedicated to the ‘Fabrication of 1D and 2D nanomaterials’. In this Special Issue, we will summarize and highlight the current status of the emerging field of nanometer-scale devices as well as the fabrication and characterization of low-dimensional materials.

Research topics of interest may include, but are not limited to: the fabrication of hybrid nanomaterials consisting of 1D and 2D materials, the fabrication of nanomaterials based on ‘top-down approach’ and ‘bottom-up approach’, graphene and 2D materials other than graphene, the low-cost fabrication of low-dimensional materials, new carbon nanomaterials, the manufacturing of nanomaterials, computational studies of low-dimensional materials, defects in nanomaterials and nanocharacterization techniques.

This open call will accept both research-based and review article submissions on this topic. All manuscripts submitted to the Special Issue will be subject to the usual high-level review process as manuscripts submitted through the regular submission route.

Dr. Daniel Sunghoi Choi
Prof. Dr. Stefan Strauf
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • III-V nanomaterials
  • energy storage materials
  • carbon nanotubes
  • graphene
  • new carbon nanomaterials
  • nanocomposites
  • meta-materials
  • nanocharacterization

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessCommunication
Easy, Quick, and Reproducible Sonochemical Synthesis of CuO Nanoparticles
Materials 2019, 12(5), 804; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12050804 - 08 Mar 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized in air by reducing copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate salt (CuSO4·5H2O) in the presence of sodium borohydride. The reaction was stabilized with Hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in a basic medium and using ultrasound waves. [...] Read more.
Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized in air by reducing copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate salt (CuSO4·5H2O) in the presence of sodium borohydride. The reaction was stabilized with Hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in a basic medium and using ultrasound waves. Different molar ratios of CTAB:Cu2+ and NaBH4:Cu2+ were explored, to optimize the synthesis conditions, and to study the stability, size, and Zeta potential of the colloidal suspension. Optimum conditions to generate spherical, stable, and monodispersed nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameters of 36 ± 1.3 nm were obtained, using 16 mM CTAB and 2 M NaBH4 (molar ratios Cu2+:CTAB:NaBH4 of 1:6:10). X-ray diffraction (XRD) was implemented, and a monoclinic CuO crystal system was formed. This demonstrated a monoclinic crystal system corresponding to CuO. The diffraction peaks were identified and confirmed according to their selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication of 1D and 2D Nanomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
First-Principles Investigation of the Adsorption Behaviors of CH2O on BN, AlN, GaN, InN, BP, and P Monolayers
Materials 2019, 12(4), 676; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12040676 - 25 Feb 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
CH2O is a common toxic gas molecule that can cause asthma and dermatitis in humans. In this study the adsorption behaviors of the CH2O adsorbed on the boron nitride (BN), aluminum nitride (AlN), gallium nitride (GaN), indium nitride (InN), [...] Read more.
CH2O is a common toxic gas molecule that can cause asthma and dermatitis in humans. In this study the adsorption behaviors of the CH2O adsorbed on the boron nitride (BN), aluminum nitride (AlN), gallium nitride (GaN), indium nitride (InN), boron phosphide (BP), and phosphorus (P) monolayers were investigated using the first-principles method, and potential materials that could be used for detecting CH2O were identified. The gas adsorption energies, charge transfers and electronic properties of the gas adsorption systems have been calculated to study the gas adsorption behaviors of CH2O on these single-layer materials. The electronic characteristics of these materials, except for the BP monolayer, were observed to change after CH2O adsorption. For CH2O on the BN, GaN, BP, and P surfaces, the gas adsorption behaviors were considered to follow a physical trend, whereas CH2O was chemically adsorbed on the AlN and InN monolayers. Given their large gas adsorption energies and high charge transfers, the AlN, GaN, and InN monolayers are potential materials for CH2O detection using the charge transfer mechanism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fabrication of 1D and 2D Nanomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop