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The 15th Anniversary of Materials—Recent Advances in Corrosion

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2024) | Viewed by 2207

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Losses due to corrosion are huge, and its mitigation measures have direct social, economic, and technological benefits. Corrosion and corrosion-assisted cracking often stand out as critical and non-trivial challenges in applications ranging from the selection of construction materials for nuclear waste containers, desalination plants, or durable electronic devices to the use of magnesium alloys as novel biodegradable temporary implants.

The intriguing aspects of corrosion that make its mitigation challenging are as follows:

  • it is a thermodynamic reality that is generally inevitable;
  • it has high costs;
  • it is an age-old phenomenon and most measures for its mitigation have been investigated with considerable success; therefore, it is often challenging to come up with something disruptive;
  • any disruptive and successful approach has the potential to be highly rewarding given the huge economic losses due to corrosion;
  • the emergence of new materials, such as graphene, additively manufactured materials, high-entropy alloys, etc., bring new opportunities for corrosion research and development.

Some of the recent topics in corrosion domain are:

  • advances in corrosion resistant coatings;
  • corrosion of bioimplants;
  • corrosion in modern and traditional energy systems;
  • corrosion of additively manufactured materials and high-entropy alloys;
  • corrosion modelling.

Corrosion, including the science and technology of its mitigation, is therefore like an antique: old but fascinating. The Special Issue “The 15th Anniversary of Materials—Recent Advances in Corrosion” will cater to the old as well as the new domains of corrosion mechanisms, monitoring, and mitigation.

Prof. Dr. Raman Singh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corrosion
  • corrosion-resistant
  • coatings
  • bioimplants
  • metals and alloys
  • modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3522 KiB  
Article
Comparative Study of Corrosion Behaviors of WC-NiMo and WC-Co Cemented Carbides
Materials 2023, 16(12), 4480; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16124480 - 20 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 829
Abstract
In this paper, the influence of a nickel binder metal and molybdenum carbide as an additional alloying element on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of WC-based cemented carbides, processed by conventional powder metallurgy, was studied, and a comparison with conventional cemented carbide (WC-Co) [...] Read more.
In this paper, the influence of a nickel binder metal and molybdenum carbide as an additional alloying element on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of WC-based cemented carbides, processed by conventional powder metallurgy, was studied, and a comparison with conventional cemented carbide (WC-Co) was carried out. The sintered alloys were characterized, before and after corrosive tests, by analyses using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The corrosion resistance of the cemented carbides was investigated by open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The WC-NiMo cemented carbides showed microstructures similar to those of WC-Co; however, pores and binder islands were observed in the microstructures. The corrosion tests showed promising results, the WC-NiMo cemented carbide showed superior corrosion resistance and higher passivation capacity than the WC-Co cemented carbide. The WC-NiMo alloy showed a higher EOC 0.18 V vs. Ag|AgCl|KCl3mol/L than the WC-Co (EOC0.45 V vs. Ag|AgCl|KCl3mol/L). The potentiodynamic polarization curves showed lower current density values throughout the potential range for the WC-NiMo alloy, and it was observed that Ecorr was less negative (0.416 V vs. Ag|AgCl|KCl3mol/L) than for WC-Co (0.543 V vs. V vs. Ag|AgCl|KCl3mol/L). The EIS analysis confirmed low rate corrosion of WC-NiMo associated with the formation of a passive thin layer. This alloy showed a higher Rct (1970.70 Ω). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 15th Anniversary of Materials—Recent Advances in Corrosion)
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15 pages, 3455 KiB  
Article
Improving of 100Cr6 Steel Corrosion and Wear Properties in Simulated Sea Water Environment by Tungsten-Doped DLC Coating
Materials 2023, 16(12), 4334; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16124334 - 12 Jun 2023
Viewed by 977
Abstract
A progressive type of tungsten-doped DLC coating was applied to a quenched and tempered 100Cr6 steel with the aim to improve the wear and corrosion properties in simulated seawater conditions and to compare the performance to conventional DLC coating. Tungsten doping caused a [...] Read more.
A progressive type of tungsten-doped DLC coating was applied to a quenched and tempered 100Cr6 steel with the aim to improve the wear and corrosion properties in simulated seawater conditions and to compare the performance to conventional DLC coating. Tungsten doping caused a shift of the corrosion potential (Ecorr) to a lower negative value of −172 mV, while the conventional DLC exhibited an Ecorr of −477 mV. In dry conditions, the W-DLC coefficient of friction is slightly higher than that of the conventional DLC (0.187 for the W-DLC vs. 0.137 for the DLC), but in cases of a saltwater environment, this difference becomes almost negligible (0.105 for the W-DLC vs. 0.076 for the DLC). The conventional DLC coating also started to show marks of deterioration when exposed to a combination of wear in a corrosive environment, while the W-DLC layer still maintained its integrity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 15th Anniversary of Materials—Recent Advances in Corrosion)
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