Special Issue "Dynamic Stability Analysis of Aerospace Structures"

A special issue of Machines (ISSN 2075-1702). This special issue belongs to the section "Automation Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jiaying Zhang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Aeronautic Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, China
Interests: morphing aircraft; structural dynamics; smart structure; nonlinear dynamics system
Prof. Dr. Michael I. Friswell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
Interests: morphing aircraft; structural dynamics; structural health monitoring; rotordynamics; smart structures; nonlinear dynamics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Alexander Shaw
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Engineering, Swansea University Bay Campus, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
Interests: nonlinear structural dynamics;rotordynamics;vibration isolation; morphing aircraft; adaptive structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce the launch of a new open access Special Issue of the MDPI journal Machines dedicated to the “Dynamic Instability Analysis of Aerospace Structures”. Aerospace structures are a combination of light structures used for aircraft and spacecraft, which are generally subject to cyclic loads. Such structures operate in complex conditions that may determine the occurrence of dynamic instability phenomena, such as parametric resonance, structural vibration and aeroelastic flutter. The large amplitude response, resulting from dynamic instability, can have severe consequences for the safety and survivability of the structures and should, therefore, be mitigated and, where possible, avoided. Different technological solutions can be developed by using optimised design, traditional mechanisms or smart materials to overcome the internal resistance and external loads and avoid the instability. However, in some cases, such as when actuating a morphing structure or a blade, controlling dynamic instability might be leveraged for increased system performance.

This Special Issue aims to provide insights into the state of the art of dynamic instability of aerospace structures and to highlight methods and solutions that may be transferrable between various application areas. Contributions on modelling, simulation and experiments are welcomed.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Jiaying Zhang
Prof. Dr. Michael I. Friswell
Dr. Alexander Shaw
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Machines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dynamic instability 
  • structural dynamics and control 
  • multistable structures 
  • nonlinear dynamics 
  • aeroelasticity 
  • morphing aircraft 
  • deployable structure 
  • parametric resonance 
  • flexible spacecraft

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aeroelastic Response of Aircraft Wings to External Store Separation Using Flexible Multibody Dynamics
Machines 2021, 9(3), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/machines9030061 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 326
Abstract
In aviation, using external stores under the wings is a common method of carrying payload or fuel. In some cases, the payload can be rigidly attached to the wing. However, stores must often be ejected during flight for aircraft, such as military type, [...] Read more.
In aviation, using external stores under the wings is a common method of carrying payload or fuel. In some cases, the payload can be rigidly attached to the wing. However, stores must often be ejected during flight for aircraft, such as military type, which carry drop tanks and missiles. This may cause the wing to respond dynamically with increasing amplitudes, due to the impulsive load of ejection and the change of total mass. This is especially critical in aircraft with highly flexible wings, such as those with high aspect ratios. In this case, it is crucial to evaluate the wing response to store separation, which requires a suitable simulation environment that is able to support nonlinear and multidisciplinary analysis. To address such a need, this work presents the use of flexible multibody dynamics in the simulation of wing response to store separation. To demonstrate, a highly compliant wing was selected with a rigid body that was mounted on the wing to represent an external store. The time marching simulation of the wing before and after the store separation was presented to show the features and benefits of the method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic Stability Analysis of Aerospace Structures)
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