Advances in Biolubrication and Biomaterials

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (22 December 2023) | Viewed by 4846

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001, Israel
Interests: biomaterials; polymer chemistry; biolubrication; surface force; antifouling; drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the course of evolution, nature has achieved remarkably lubricated surfaces, with healthy articular cartilage in the major synovial joints being the prime example, that can last a lifetime as they slide past each other with ultralow friction under physiological pressures. Such properties are unmatched by any synthetic materials. The lubrication mechanism of low friction between such sliding cartilage tissues, which is closely related to osteoarthritis (OA), the most widespread joint disease, affecting hundreds of millions worldwide, has been studied for nearly a century, but cannot be fully explained with the established theories. Understanding the origins of such low friction of the articular cartilage, therefore, is of major importance to designing new biolubricants or self-lubricating materials in order to alleviate disease symptoms, and slow or even reverse its breakdown. There are many other biological systems concerned with biotribology issues, such as the eyes, oral cavity, gastrointestinal tracts, skin, and hair, etc.

In this issue, we welcome original research articles and reviews with topics (but are not limited to) including the design, synthesis, and characterization of biolubricants; novel therapeutic approaches for the treatments of OA and other friction-related diseases; lubrication mechanisms of articular cartilage; tribology of total artificial joints; self-lubricating materials.

We are looking forward to your valued contributions.

Dr. Weifeng Lin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biolubrication
  • biolubricants
  • bioinspired lubricants
  • cartilage lubrication
  • artificial joints
  • osteoarthritis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 12183 KiB  
Article
Titanium Nitride Coatings on CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V Alloys: Effects on Wear and Ion Release
by Mohammed AbuAlia, Spencer Fullam, Filippo Cinotti, Noora Manninen and Markus A. Wimmer
Lubricants 2024, 12(3), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12030096 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 638
Abstract
While titanium nitride (TiN) coatings are well known for their biocompatibility and excellent mechanical properties, their wear particle and debris release in orthopedic implants remains a matter of active investigation. This study addresses the efficacy of TiN coatings on CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V alloys [...] Read more.
While titanium nitride (TiN) coatings are well known for their biocompatibility and excellent mechanical properties, their wear particle and debris release in orthopedic implants remains a matter of active investigation. This study addresses the efficacy of TiN coatings on CoCrMo and Ti6Al4V alloys to enhance wear resistance and reduce ion release from prosthetic implants. Three different coating variants were utilized: one variant deposited using arc evaporation (Arc) followed by post-treatment, and two variants deposited using high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with or without post-treatment. The coatings’ performance was assessed through standard wear testing against ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in bovine serum lubricant, and in the presence of abrasive PMMA bone cement particles in the lubricant. The results indicated that Arc and HiPIMS with post-treatment significantly reduced wear and eliminated detectable metal ion release, suggesting that these coatings could extend implant longevity and minimize adverse biological responses. Further long-term simulator and in vivo studies are recommended to validate these promising findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biolubrication and Biomaterials)
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16 pages, 2564 KiB  
Article
Rheological Behavior of Different Calf Sera before, during and after Biomechanical Testing
by Maximilian Uhler, Mareike Schonhoff, Timo A. Nees, Tanja Wonerow, Jens Nuppnau, Frank Mantwill, Jan Philippe Kretzer and Stefan Schroeder
Lubricants 2022, 10(9), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants10090224 - 15 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1208
Abstract
Due to different rheological behavior of human synovial fluid and the test mediums for in vitro examinations, wear tests cannot replicate the in vivo situation completely. The standards for wear testing indicate calf serum as in vitro test medium. However, these standards do [...] Read more.
Due to different rheological behavior of human synovial fluid and the test mediums for in vitro examinations, wear tests cannot replicate the in vivo situation completely. The standards for wear testing indicate calf serum as in vitro test medium. However, these standards do not contain precise information on the main constituent components and the rheological properties. In this study, bovine calf serum and newborn calf serum with a protein concentration of 20 g/L, both approved for wear testing defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), were characterized according to their rheological properties to detect differences before and during tribological simulation. The rheological behavior was determined at five defined intervals of a tribological test. The two test fluids differ in their rheological properties before and during the test and can therefore lead to deviating results in tribological testing. Furthermore, both test media changes considerably over test duration. At a test duration of 0.5 Mio cycles, both fluids have changed so that there is no longer any difference between them in terms of rheological properties. These changes could be attributed to denaturation and degradation of proteins. Thus, the choice of medium impacts tribological test results which should be considered for the interpretation of these studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biolubrication and Biomaterials)
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Review

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48 pages, 15715 KiB  
Review
Fundamental Structure–Function Relationships in Vegetable Oil-Based Lubricants: A Critical Review
by Navindra Soodoo, Laziz Bouzidi and Suresh S. Narine
Lubricants 2023, 11(7), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants11070284 - 04 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2506
Abstract
Vegetable oil (VO)-based lubricants are environmentally friendly replacements for mineral oils. This work critically reviews the literature and identifies the molecular structures in VO-based lubricants which have been used to improve performance. The specific roles that size, type, number, position, spatial arrangement, and [...] Read more.
Vegetable oil (VO)-based lubricants are environmentally friendly replacements for mineral oils. This work critically reviews the literature and identifies the molecular structures in VO-based lubricants which have been used to improve performance. The specific roles that size, type, number, position, spatial arrangement, and symmetry play in determining lubricating functionality were highlighted. Data were systematically collected to identify the contributions of major structural components and relate them to specific physical functionality measurables. The relationships were presented to reveal structure–function trends. Empirical predictive relationships between flow and thermal transition properties and structures were established. Molecular mass was revealed to be a fundamental determinant of viscosity and transition temperatures, but these properties were shown to also be influenced by other structural factors such as polar functional groups, branching, and symmetry. Almost all the examined viscosity data plotted versus molecular mass are enclosed within the 95% prediction band of an exponential rise to a maximum function (R2 = 0.7897). Generally, for both flow and thermal transition, a given structure versus function follows simple linear or exponential functions with unbranched VO-based lubricants, lending themselves more easily to strong correlations. This review is a first step towards comprehensively relating structure to lubrication function. The revealed relationships of structural contributions to the lubricating functionality of VO-based lubricants provide insights that may be used to extend the ranges of chemical and physical properties of some molecular architectures examined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Biolubrication and Biomaterials)
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