Friction–Vibration Interactions

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 5187

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000, Israel
2. School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331, China
Interests: interficial mechanics; wear modelling; contact mechanics; water-lubricated bearing
Key Laboratory of Marine Power Engineering and Technology, Ministry of Transportation, Wuhan 430063, China
Interests: friction-induced vibration; noise; dynamic analysis; fault diagnosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of friction–vibration interactions is crucial to understanding the vibration behavior of various mechanical components and systems. It explores the intricate relationship between friction and vibration, shedding light on the underlying mechanisms implicated and their effects on the performance and reliability of key components in mechanical systems. This Special Issue, entitled "Friction–Vibration Interactions," focuses on employing theoretical and experimental methods in order to reveal the coupling interaction between the interface mechanics of tribo-components in mechanical systems, such as lubrication, asperity contact, interfacial deformation, temperature rise, and the vibration behaviors of tribo-components and mechanical systems.

This Special Issue encompasses both numerical and experimental studies, aiming to provide a comprehensive exploration of the subject matter. Researchers and engineers from diverse backgrounds have contributed their expertise to this Special Issue, making it a valuable resource for anyone interested in interfacing mechanics, friction-induced vibration, tribodynamics, and mechanical system dynamics, among others.

This Special Issue also explores the role of lubrication, including fluid and solid lubrication, in mitigating friction-induced vibration and its noise. Lubricants play a crucial role in reducing friction and wear, thereby minimizing the occurrence of vibration-induced failure and vibration noise. This Special Issue highlights the mechanism by which interfacial lubrication affects the suppression of vibrations in components and systems. It also aims to optimize lubrication strategies in order to enhance the performance and longevity of mechanical systems.

In summary, this Special Issue, entitled "Friction–Vibration Interactions", offers a comprehensive exploration of the field of interfacial science. It addresses various aspects, including interfacing mechanics, friction-induced vibration, tribodynamics, vibration noise, and more. It is antipacted that this Special Issue will provide valuable insights for researchers and engineers in related fields.

Dr. Guo Xiang
Dr. Yong Jin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Lubricants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interficial mechanics
  • friction-indcued vibration
  • tribo-dynamic
  • mechanical system
  • key components
  • numerical study
  • experimental study

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 3470 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Lubricant’s Viscosity on Reducing the Frictional-Induced Fluctuation on the Onset of Friction
by Shutian Liu, Juncheng Lv and Chuanbo Liu
Lubricants 2024, 12(4), 136; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12040136 - 17 Apr 2024
Viewed by 680
Abstract
The initial friction stage between the contacting materials would generate a maximum shear force and an unstable fluctuating time, which had a negative effect on the entire frictional system, especially at low temperature conditions. In order to decrease the occurring shear force and [...] Read more.
The initial friction stage between the contacting materials would generate a maximum shear force and an unstable fluctuating time, which had a negative effect on the entire frictional system, especially at low temperature conditions. In order to decrease the occurring shear force and fluctuating time on the onset of friction, two different lubricating oils were applied in this study to investigate the influence of lubricant’s viscosity on these friction behaviors. The frictional experiments were conducted between the steel ball and the 40CrMnMo, and special attention was paid to the relationship between maximum friction force, fluctuating time, frictional vibration and the initial lubricant temperature. The results showed that the friction force first increased to the maximum value and then experienced an oscillation damping period (fluctuating time) before it reached a stable state. And this fluctuating behavior caused corresponding vibrations on the initial contacting. However, compared to the high viscosity lubricating oil (HO), the low viscosity lubricating oil (LO) contributed to more than 50% reductions on max friction force, fluctuating time and vibration at the cold start (0 °C). Moreover, the weakened initial frictional fluctuation was conducive to generating a low and stable friction coefficient (COF) and wear loss of the long-term test. The discrepancy on lubricating performance was that the low viscosity provided high fluidity, which allowed rapid distribution of the lubricant between the contacting surfaces and formed an intact lubricating film. Similarly, the high temperature decreased the viscosity of HO and thus led to satisfactory friction reductions. The knowledge gained herein provides a supporting theory on the design and preparation of a lubricating oil with high performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction–Vibration Interactions)
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24 pages, 15221 KiB  
Article
Thermal Tribo-Dynamic Behaviors of Water-Lubricated Bearings during Start-Up with Journal Shape Error
by Shouan Chen, Jianlin Cai, Junfu Zhang and Zaixin Liu
Lubricants 2024, 12(4), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12040106 - 23 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1092
Abstract
In practical scenarios, journal bearings often exhibit shape errors due to machining imperfections and operational wear. These deviations from perfect roundness can significantly impact the performance of journal bearings during start-up. This study investigates the impact of journal shape errors on transient mixed [...] Read more.
In practical scenarios, journal bearings often exhibit shape errors due to machining imperfections and operational wear. These deviations from perfect roundness can significantly impact the performance of journal bearings during start-up. This study investigates the impact of journal shape errors on transient mixed lubrications, such as water film temperature and asperity contact, as well as on the rotor dynamics of water-lubricated bearings (WLB) at start-up. The simulation results of the developed numerical model are compared with the experimental data from existing studies to verify their accuracy. Following this validation, parametric analyses are conducted using the model. The analytical results indicate that journal shape error increases the temperature rise of the water-lubricated bearing system during start-up. The greater the error in journal shape, the higher the temperature rise, both in terms of shape amplitude and waviness order. Interestingly, the thermal deformation caused by the temperature effect decreases the vertical displacement during start-up. The study also finds that higher start-up speeds lead to quicker temperature increases when shape errors are present. However, these speeds enable the bearing to more rapidly reach the elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) stage, where the temperature rise stabilizes. Therefore, start-up speeds must be carefully selected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction–Vibration Interactions)
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20 pages, 10327 KiB  
Article
Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of a Spur Gear Pair System with Wear Considering the Meshing Position
by Zhibo Geng, Min Chen, Jiao Wang, Yu Xia, Yun Kong and Ke Xiao
Lubricants 2024, 12(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12010025 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1412
Abstract
In this paper, a nonlinear dynamic model of a parallel shaft gear system consisting of two involute spur gears is developed to investigate the coupling effect between the gradual surface wear of gear teeth over time and nonlinear dynamic characteristics. A uniform wear [...] Read more.
In this paper, a nonlinear dynamic model of a parallel shaft gear system consisting of two involute spur gears is developed to investigate the coupling effect between the gradual surface wear of gear teeth over time and nonlinear dynamic characteristics. A uniform wear model that accounts for how the volumetric wear of the gear teeth affect their meshing position, backlash, and stiffness is proposed. Additionally, a nonlinear dynamic model with six degrees of freedom is described that considers friction, time-varying gear backlash, and time-varying meshing stiffness. The proposed model significantly changes the mesh stiffness, not only in terms of value but also in terms of contact ratio. Furthermore, the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of the gear system vary significantly. It is found that the gradual wear of gear teeth affects the meshing position and further has a significant impact on the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of the spur gear system. This paper provides a basis for studying the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of the spur gear system as it experiences the gradual wear of teeth over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction–Vibration Interactions)
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21 pages, 4201 KiB  
Article
Study on the Dynamic Characteristics of Gears Considering Surface Topography in a Mixed Lubrication State
by Gong Cheng, Jianzuo Ma, Junyang Li, Kang Sun, Kang Wang and Yun Wang
Lubricants 2024, 12(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12010007 - 27 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1541
Abstract
Based on mixed lubrication analysis, considering the influence of rough interface contact stiffness, contact damping, and interface friction on the gear transmission system, the relationship between interface contact and the overall performance of the gear transmission system has been established. First, the surface [...] Read more.
Based on mixed lubrication analysis, considering the influence of rough interface contact stiffness, contact damping, and interface friction on the gear transmission system, the relationship between interface contact and the overall performance of the gear transmission system has been established. First, the surface topography is characterized using statistical parameters of rough surfaces, and the contact stiffness and damping for tooth surfaces with different roughnesses are calculated. Subsequently, a six degree of freedom gear tribo-dynamics coupling model is developed. Finally, the established tribo-dynamics model is employed to investigate the relationship between surface roughness and the overall performance of the gear transmission system. This study provides a more intimate connection between the contact interface and the general behavior of the gear transmission system, enabling a better representation of real-world engineering problems. The research findings reveal that contact stiffness and damping decrease with increasing surface roughness. Higher roughness leads to greater gear vibration amplitude. Moreover, elevated surface roughness results in intensified meshing force and more significant energy loss. Surprisingly, when the roughness is appropriate, gears with rough surfaces lose less energy than those with smooth surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Friction–Vibration Interactions)
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