Uptake, Translocation, and Metabolism of Trace Metals in Plants

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 6985

Special Issue Editors

Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental & Resource Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: hyperaccumulator; phytoremediation; cadmium; zinc; phloem translocation

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Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Science and Technology University, Gopalganj 8100, Bangladesh
Interests: plant nutrition; trace elements and health; phytoremediation, biofortification, plant system biology
Key laboratory of soil contamination bioremediation of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forest University, Lin’an, Hangzhou 311300, China
Interests: bamboo; heavy metals; carbon; soil remediation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Trace metals can be essential micronutrients, but they can also be extremely toxic to plant growth and human health. Trace metal concentrations in diverse environments vary greatly due to natural and anthropogenic factors, ranging from deficiency to highly toxic levels. A better understanding of trace metal behavior in plants may contribute to the development of strategies for 1) the phytoremediation of toxic heavy metals (such as Cd, Pb, Hg, and Cr) by using hyperaccumulator or accumulator plants, 2) the biofortification of micronutrients, particularly Zn, Fe, and Se, for better human health, and 3) molecular and physiological detoxification mechanisms of toxic metals in crop plants. Therefore, one focus of plant research is on the response to trace metals in terms of uptake, transport, sequestration, speciation, physiological use, deficiency, toxicity, and detoxification. For this Special Issue, we invite investigators to contribute original research articles and review articles that will stimulate efforts contributing to enhancing our understanding of trace metal behavior in plants.

Dr. Lingli Lu
Dr. Jahidul Islam Shohag
Dr. Dan Liu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • heavy metals
  • hyperaccumulator
  • crop plants
  • phytoremediation
  • biofortification
  • detoxification
  • uptake
  • translocation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2002 KiB  
Article
Effects of Hypoxia Stress on Growth, Root Respiration, and Metabolism of Phyllostachys praecox
by Jiawei Ma, Gul Rukh, Zhongqiang Ruan, Xiaocui Xie, Zhengqian Ye and Dan Liu
Life 2022, 12(6), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12060808 - 29 May 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1866
Abstract
Hypoxia affects plant growth, hormone content, various enzyme activities, cell structure, peroxide production, and metabolic level, therefore reducing crop yield. This study assessed the physiological, biochemical, and metabolic characteristics of Phyllostachys praecox. Results revealed that hypoxia stress treatment significantly inhibited plant growth. [...] Read more.
Hypoxia affects plant growth, hormone content, various enzyme activities, cell structure, peroxide production, and metabolic level, therefore reducing crop yield. This study assessed the physiological, biochemical, and metabolic characteristics of Phyllostachys praecox. Results revealed that hypoxia stress treatment significantly inhibited plant growth. Leaf chlorophyll contents was initially improved and then reduced with plant growth time. Under hypoxia stress, the root activity significantly was reduced, leading to the decrease in the nutrient absorption and transport. Yet, with low oxygen concentration, the contents of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and lactic acid were improved. With hypoxia stress, phospholipids and amino acids were the main metabolites of Phyllostachys praecox. Glycosphospholipid metabolism is the key pathway in responding to hypoxia stress significantly (p < 0.05), and lysophosphatidlycholine (lysoPC) and phosphatidylcholines (PC) in the metabolites of this metabolic pathway were significantly enhanced. Our study reveals the mechanism of Phyllostachys praecox cell membrane responding to hypoxia stress based on molecular level. This is conducive to finding targeted solutions to improve the productivity of Phyllostachys praecox to better optimize a mulching approach in the bamboo forest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Uptake, Translocation, and Metabolism of Trace Metals in Plants)
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15 pages, 3321 KiB  
Article
Role of SaPCR2 in Zn Uptake in the Root Elongation Zone of the Zn/Cd Hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii
by Jun Ge, Jiayu Lin, Zhiying Wu, Kuan Xu, Jingyu Tao, Haizhong Lin, Shengke Tian and Lingli Lu
Life 2022, 12(5), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12050768 - 23 May 2022
Viewed by 1558
Abstract
Zn pollution is a potential toxicant for agriculture and the environment. Sedum alfredii is a Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator found in China and has been proven as a useful resource for the phytoremediation of Zn-contaminated sites. However, the molecular mechanism of Zn uptake in S. [...] Read more.
Zn pollution is a potential toxicant for agriculture and the environment. Sedum alfredii is a Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator found in China and has been proven as a useful resource for the phytoremediation of Zn-contaminated sites. However, the molecular mechanism of Zn uptake in S. alfredii is limited. In this study, the function of SaPCR2 on Zn uptake in S. alfredii was identified by gene expression analysis, yeast function assays, Zn accumulation and root morphology analysis in transgenic lines to further elucidate the mechanisms of uptake and translocation of Zn in S. alfredii. The results showed that SaPCR2 was highly expressed in the root elongation zone of the hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) S. alfredii, and high Zn exposure downregulated the expression of SaPCR2 in the HE S. alfredii root. The heterologous expression of SaPCR2 in yeast suggested that SaPCR2 was responsible for Zn influx. The overexpression of SaPCR2 in the non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) S. alfredii significantly increased the root uptake of Zn, but did not influence Mn, Cu or Fe. SR-μ-XRF technology showed that more Zn was distributed in the vascular buddle tissues, as well as in the cortex and epidermis in the transgenic lines. Root morphology was also altered after SaPCR2 overexpression, and a severe inhibition was observed. In the transgenic lines, the meristematic and elongation zones of the root were lower compared to the WT, and Zn accumulation in meristem cells was also reduced. These results indicate that SaPCR2 is responsible for Zn uptake, and mainly functions in the root elongation zone. This research on SaPCR2 could provide a theoretical basis for the use of genetic engineering technology in the modification of crops for their safe production and biological enhancement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Uptake, Translocation, and Metabolism of Trace Metals in Plants)
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16 pages, 3507 KiB  
Article
Screening of Leafy Vegetable Varieties with Low Lead and Cadmium Accumulation Based on Foliar Uptake
by Zhangqian Xu, Jianwei Peng, Zhen Zhu, Pengyue Yu, Maodi Wang, Zhi Huang, Ying Huang and Zhaojun Li
Life 2022, 12(3), 339; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12030339 - 24 Feb 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2378
Abstract
Leafy vegetables cultivated in kitchen gardens and suburban areas often accumulate excessive amounts of heavy metals and pose a threat to human health. For this reason, plenty of studies have focused on low accumulation variety screening. However, identifying specific leafy vegetable varieties according [...] Read more.
Leafy vegetables cultivated in kitchen gardens and suburban areas often accumulate excessive amounts of heavy metals and pose a threat to human health. For this reason, plenty of studies have focused on low accumulation variety screening. However, identifying specific leafy vegetable varieties according to the foliar uptake of air pollution remains to be explored (despite foliar uptake being an important pathway for heavy-metal accumulation). Therefore, in this study, the lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) contents, leaf morphology, and particle matter contents were analyzed in a micro-area experiment using 20 common vegetables. The results show that the Pb content in leaves ranged from 0.70 to 3.86 mg kg−1, and the Cd content ranged from 0.21 to 0.99 mg kg−1. Atmospheric particles were clearly scattered on the leaf surface, and the particles were smaller than the stomata. Considering the Pb and Cd contents in the leaves and roots, stomata width-to-length ratio, leaf area size, enrichment factor, and translocation factor, Yidianhongxiancai, Qingxiancai, Baiyuanyexiancai, Nanjingjiangengbai and Sijixiaobaicai were recommended for planting in kitchen gardens and suburban areas as they have low accumulation characteristics. Identifying the influencing factors in the accumulation of heavy metals in vegetables through foliar uptake is important to help plant physiologists/environmentalists/policy makers to select suitable varieties for planting in air-polluted areas and thus reduce their threat to human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Uptake, Translocation, and Metabolism of Trace Metals in Plants)
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