Special Issue "Land Systems in Transition between Persistence and Change"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ileana Pătru-Stupariu
Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Research of University of Bucharest, ICUB, Transdisciplinary Research Centre Landscape- Territory-Information Systems, CeLTIS, Splaiul Independenței no. 91-95, 050095 Bucharest, Romania
2. Department of Regional Geography and Environment, Faculty of Geography, University of Bucharest, Bd. N. Bălcescu, 1, 010041 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: landscape ecology; modeling of landscape dynamics; landscape fragmentation; landscape planning; land use/land cover change and geographic approaches (nature and society)
Prof. Dr. Christine Fürst
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Institute for Geosciences and Geography, Dept. Sustainable Landscape Development, University of Halle, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 4, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
Interests: social–ecological system models; ecosystem services; impact assessment; participatory planning processes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At present, the landscape is subject to increasing demands and pressures. The spatial changes are discussed in various contexts. They may refer to various processes, such as deforestation and changes in land use and land cover with consequences for habitat fragmentation or urban sprawl, which leads to cropland split and infrastructure development. An important facet of the changes refers to anthropogenic pressure, especially that resulting from land use/land cover change, climate change, and giving up traditional land use practices. The role played by the socioeconomic and political factors also needs to be taken into consideration, since they could induce changes at the landscape scale.

It is important to identify the driving forces, which can be general (economic, political, natural) or specific (urbanization, infrastructure development). In order to explore the changes and persistence or resilience of landscapes, scientists can follow at least two tracks, either independently or in a synergistic manner. The first one is to produce maps or to compute and analyze indicators. The second approach is to interact with the local population, with stakeholders and authorities in order to manage well the re-shaping of landscapes. Finally, the identification of changes/persistence could help to find appropriate tools or policies for a sustainable landscape management.

This Special Issue on Land Systems in Transition between Persistence and Change focuses on interdisciplinary approaches related to landscape ecology, landscape analysis, modeling of landscape dynamics, land use/land cover change, and landscape planning. We invite the authors to contribute to specific issues related to the topics mentioned above. Contributions that explore links between these themes and landscape governance, participatory approaches and ecosystem/environment behavior are also welcome.

Prof. Pătru-Stupariu Ileana
Prof. Dr. Christine Fürst
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Land use/cover change
  • Landscape persistence
  • Landscape planning
  • Ecosystems/environment behavior
  • Habitat loss
  • Driving forces
  • Changes
  • Governance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Degradation of Coastlines under the Pressure of Urbanization and Tourism: Evidence on the Change of Land Systems from Europe, Asia and Africa
Land 2020, 9(8), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9080275 - 17 Aug 2020
Abstract
The importance of studying coastal areas is justified by their resources, ecosystem services, and key role played in socio-economic development. Coastal landscapes are subject to increasing demands and pressures, requiring in-depth analyses for finding appropriate tools or policies for a sustainable landscape management. [...] Read more.
The importance of studying coastal areas is justified by their resources, ecosystem services, and key role played in socio-economic development. Coastal landscapes are subject to increasing demands and pressures, requiring in-depth analyses for finding appropriate tools or policies for a sustainable landscape management. The present study addresses this issue globally, based on case studies from three continents: Romania (Europe), Algeria (Africa), and Vietnam (Asia), focusing on the anthropogenic pressure resulting from land use/land cover change or urban sprawl, taking into account the role of socioeconomic and political factors. The methodology consisted of producing maps and computing and analyzing indicators, correlating geospatial and socio-economic data in a synergistic manner to explore the changes of landscapes, and identify the specific driving forces. The findings show that the pressure of urbanization and tourism on coastal areas increased, while the drivers and impacts vary. Urbanization is due to derogatory planning in Romania and Algeria, and different national and local goals in Vietnam. The two drivers determine local exemptions from the national regulations, made for profit. In addition to the need for developing and enforcing policies for stopping the degradation and restoring the ecosystems, the findings underline the importance of international cooperation in policy development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Systems in Transition between Persistence and Change)
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Open AccessReview
A Review of Changes in Mountain Land Use and Ecosystem Services: From Theory to Practice
Land 2020, 9(9), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9090336 - 22 Sep 2020
Abstract
Global changes impact the human-environment relationship, and, in particular, they affect the provision of ecosystem services. Mountain ecosystems provide a wide range of such services, but they are highly sensitive and vulnerable to change due to various human pressures and natural processes. We [...] Read more.
Global changes impact the human-environment relationship, and, in particular, they affect the provision of ecosystem services. Mountain ecosystems provide a wide range of such services, but they are highly sensitive and vulnerable to change due to various human pressures and natural processes. We conducted a literature survey that focused on two main issues. The first was the identification of quantitative methods aimed at assessing the impact of land use changes in mountain regions and the related ecosystem services. The second was the analysis of the extent to which the outcomes of these assessments are useful and transferable to stakeholders. We selected papers through a keyword-driven search of the ISI Web of Knowledge and other international databases. The keywords used for the search were mountain land use change and ecosystem service. Quantitative approaches to ecosystem service assessment rely on suitable indicators, therefore land use/land cover can be used as an appropriate proxy. Landscape metrics are a powerful analytical tool; their use can increase the accuracy of assessments and facilitate the mitigation of specific phenomena, such as fragmentation or the reduction of core habitat areas. Mapping is essential: it is the basis for spatial analyzes and eases the interactions between stakeholders. Land use/land cover change is a temporal process, so both past and future approaches are meaningful. It is necessary to enhance information transfer from theory to practice. Increasing stakeholder awareness can lead to suitable management solutions, and, reciprocally, stakeholder feedback can help improve current assessment methodologies and contribute to developing new tools that are suitable for specific problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Systems in Transition between Persistence and Change)
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