Climate Change - Achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals in Urban Contexts

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change and Urban Ecosystems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 14448

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Geosciences and Geography, Department Sustainable Landscape Development, University of Halle, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 4, 06120 Halle, Germany
Interests: social–ecological system models; ecosystem services; impact assessment; participatory planning processes at urban and landscape scales; climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies; biodiversity trends and governance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Gujrat, Gujrat 50700, Pakistan
Interests: social–ecological system models; ecosystem services; impact assessment; participatory planning processes at urban and landscape scale; climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Geo informatics and Climatic sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Interests: satellite image analysis; geomorphological studies; spatial analyses; climate change and the environment; soil and water conservation

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Urban and Environmental Sociology Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany
Interests: monitoring urban land use and land cover; analysing impacts of land-use dynamics and population development; resilient urban development; mapping and monitoring urban ecosystems and their services

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, School of Arts and Sciences, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar 14200, Mongolia
Interests: urban planning concepts; urban sprawl; spatial indicators; spatial processes and analyses

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geography and GIScience, Social Sciences, Human Services and Criminal Justice, Borrough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10007, USA
Interests: GIS tools and analytical processes to detect and assess land use/land cover changes; landscape ecology; urban planning and development

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Architecture, Universidad de Piura, Piura, Peru
2. Visiting Professor at Austral University of Chile, Valdivia, Chile
Interests: resilience of cities against climate change; urbanism; urban planning and development; urban architecture; land use planning; sustainable development

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Laboratorio per la Pianificazione Territoriale e Ambientale (LAPTA), Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Catania, Viale S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania, Italy
Interests: urban planning and sustainability; environmental management; environmental impact assessment; climate change; spatial analyses; ecosystem services
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Land Administration and Urban Land Use Planning, Department of Geography, School of Arts and Sciences, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar 14200, Mongolia
Interests: land use and urban planning; property rights; geomatics; decision making processes

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
West African Center for Climate Change and Adapted Land Use (WASCAL), Federal University of Technology, Minna PMB 65, Niger State, Nigeria
Interests: climate change; geoinformation; satellite image analysis; human and physical geography; urban development and urban / land system resilience toward climage change

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Section Geography, University of Passau, Passau, Germany
Interests: development research & global studies; urbanism and local development; social network analysis; sustainability & sustainable development; tourism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid urbanization is one of the most relevant but also threatening trends for achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals for 2030. One prominent aim, SDG 13 Climate Action, is directly related to sustainable urban development. Increases in impervious areas from soil sealing and land consumption by unplanned or informal urban development is weakening the resilience and adaptive capacities not only of the urban systems, but of their environments on which they pose huge pressures in terms of pollution, local climate changes and biodiversity losses. One of the key requirements for sustainable urban systems is therefore to include Climate Action in policies and planning for livelihood and human well-being.

Vice versa, urban areas are suffering particularly from climate change impacts, considering, for instance, urban heat effects in hot summers, increasing flood risks or long smog periods. Sustainable Cities and Communities (SDG 11) are expected to contribute largely to a bundle of UN SDGs, such as SDG 3 (Good Health and Wellbeing), SDG 6 (Clean water and sanitation), and SDG 15 (Life on Land). The achievement of many of them can be endangered through adverse climate change impacts which provoke water scarcity, critical situations related to portable water, sewage disposal and problems related to waterborne diseases. Additionally, climate change-driven migration can contribute to informal settlements at urban fringes that put undue pressure on relevant services such as the circulation of cool air, water percolation and flood mitigation.

We are pleased to invite scientists working at the nexus of climate change–urban development–sustainability to this Special Issue which intends to present case studies in different global regions about the interactions of climate change and the achievement of the UN SDGs, particularly in fast growing metropolitan areas, but also with regard to future risks for urban development. This Special Issue also intends to showcase how smart urban planning, improved information and communication policies and governance mixes can help us to mitigate and overcome the negative back-coupling effects of climate change for sustainable urban development.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome, but also perspective and discussion papers. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Climate change impacts on urban sustainable development goals;
  • Climate change risks, threats and chances for sustainable urban development;
  • Climate change and rural–urban migration patterns;
  • Climate trends and urban green, blue and grey infrastructure;
  • Nature-based solutions for coping with climate change in urban contexts;
  • Participatory urban planning instruments to respond to climate change;
  • Sustainable urban governance under future climate conditions;
  • Urban planning and development of resilient cities;
  • Urban dwellers viewpoints on climate change—vulnerable groups.

Prof. Dr. Christine Fürst
Prof. Dr. Muhammad Mushahid Anwar
Prof. Dr. Yazidhi Bamutaze
Dr. Ellen Banzhaf
Prof. Dr. Bolormaa Batsuuri
Prof. Dr. Henry Bulley
Prof. Dr. Paula Kapstein
Prof. Dr. Daniele La Rosa
Prof. Dr. Purevtseren Myagmartseren
Prof. Dr. Appollonia Okhimamhe
Prof. Dr. Malte Steinbrink
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • nature-based solutions
  • participatory planning instruments
  • rural–urban migration
  • urbanization
  • urban governance
  • urban planning and development
  • UN Sustainable Development Goals

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

33 pages, 6780 KiB  
Article
What Cities Want to Measure: Bottom-Up Selection of Indicators for Systemic Change toward Climate Neutrality Aligned with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 40 European Cities
by Rohit Mondal, Sabrina Bresciani and Francesca Rizzo
Climate 2024, 12(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli12030041 - 8 Mar 2024
Viewed by 2153
Abstract
Cities are taking action to respond to climate change by designing and implementing sustainable solutions which provide benefits and challenges to citizens. Measuring the progress and effects of such actions at the urban level, beyond mere greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions quantification, is still [...] Read more.
Cities are taking action to respond to climate change by designing and implementing sustainable solutions which provide benefits and challenges to citizens. Measuring the progress and effects of such actions at the urban level, beyond mere greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions quantification, is still an emerging research area. Based on data from the 40 European cities belonging to 20 pilot city programmes within the EU-funded NetZeroCities (NZC) project, cities’ selections and preferences for indicators for assessing their climate actions are analysed in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This study provides bottom-up evidence of cities’ selection of non-GHG indicators through different levers of change, including participatory governance and social innovation, for assessing progress and the co-benefits of actions toward climate neutrality taken at the urban level. The resulting list of indicators, classified according to the SDGs, provides evidence of cities’ priorities and can be utilised by cities’ climate transition teams and also by researchers, as it highlights gaps and opportunities compared to extant literature. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 8245 KiB  
Article
Climate Patterns Affecting Cold Season Air Pollution of Ulaanbaatar City, Mongolia
by Erdenesukh Sumiya, Sandelger Dorligjav, Myagmartseren Purevtseren, Gantulga Gombodorj, Munkhbat Byamba-Ochir, Oyunchimeg Dugerjav, Munkhnaran Sugar, Bolormaa Batsuuri and Bazarkhand Tsegmid
Climate 2023, 11(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli11010004 - 24 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4543
Abstract
Many studies have been conducted on air pollution in Ulaanbaatar city. However, most have focused on the sources of pollutants and their characteristics and distribution. Although the location of the city subjects it to unavoidable natural conditions where air pollution accumulates during the [...] Read more.
Many studies have been conducted on air pollution in Ulaanbaatar city. However, most have focused on the sources of pollutants and their characteristics and distribution. Although the location of the city subjects it to unavoidable natural conditions where air pollution accumulates during the cold season, nature-based solutions have not yet been considered in the projects implemented to mitigate air pollution levels. Therefore, this study aims to determine the combined influence of geography and atmospheric factors on cold season air pollution. The spatiotemporal variations in the variables were investigated using meteorological observation data from 1991 to 2020 in the different land-use areas. Then, atmospheric stagnation conditions and air pollution potential parameters were estimated from daily radiosonde data. Subsequently, the temporal variations in air pollutants were studied and correlated with estimates of the above parameters. In the Ulaanbaatar depression, the stable cold air lake (colder than −13.5 °C), windless (34–66% of all observations), and poor turbulent mixing conditions were formed under the near-surface temperature inversion layer in the cold season. Moreover, due to the mountain topography, the winds toward the city center from all sides cause polluted air to accumulate in the city center for long periods. Air pollution potential was categorized as very high and high (<4000 m2·s−1), in the city in winter, indicating the worst air quality. Thus, further urban planning policy should consider these nature factors. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 7693 KiB  
Article
The Application of Geographical Information Systems and the Analytic Hierarchy Process in Selecting Sustainable Areas for Urban Green Spaces: A Case Study in Hue City, Vietnam
by Nguyen Hoang Khanh Linh, Pham Gia Tung, Huynh Van Chuong, Nguyen Bich Ngoc and Tran Thi Phuong
Climate 2022, 10(6), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10060082 - 12 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3536
Abstract
In recent years, there has been growing awareness about the roles and benefits of urban green spaces (UGSs), particularly in the context of mitigating the negative effects of climate change, which have become increasingly serious. In Vietnam, the government has allocated considerable resources [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been growing awareness about the roles and benefits of urban green spaces (UGSs), particularly in the context of mitigating the negative effects of climate change, which have become increasingly serious. In Vietnam, the government has allocated considerable resources to the development of UGSs in many cities. However, regarding implementation, UGS development in Vietnam faces many challenges; many cities find it difficult to meet the set criterion regarding the number of green spaces per capita. This research was conducted in Hue City, which is known as one of the greenest cities in Vietnam. The results show that there are twenty-one UGSs in Hue City (with a total area of 88.67 ha). These are located primarily along the Huong River and around the Hue Imperial Citadel. However, under government stipulations, the current number of UGSs is not considered sufficient in proportion to the local population, and will not accommodate the future growth of the population. We applied the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) along with the participation of local residents, using six criteria to map potential areas for future UGS planning. In this, the distance from existing residential areas to potential UGS locations is the most important criterion. The suitability map identified 684 hectares of Hue City as highly suitable for UGSs. This research also proposes a scenario for UGS planning in Hue based on retaining the existing green spaces combined with creating another 35 green spaces, comprising a total area of 167 hectares. This is to meet the needs of local residents by 2030. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

16 pages, 5906 KiB  
Perspective
Mapping Open Data and Big Data to Address Climate Resilience of Urban Informal Settlements in Sub-Saharan Africa
by Ellen Banzhaf, Henry N. Bulley, Justice Nana Inkoom and Sebastian Elze
Climate 2022, 10(12), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli10120186 - 22 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2283
Abstract
This perspective paper highlights the potentials, limitations, and combinations of openly available Earth observation (EO) data and big data in the context of environmental research in urban areas. The aim is to build the resilience of informal settlements to climate change impacts. In [...] Read more.
This perspective paper highlights the potentials, limitations, and combinations of openly available Earth observation (EO) data and big data in the context of environmental research in urban areas. The aim is to build the resilience of informal settlements to climate change impacts. In particular, it highlights the types, categories, spatial and temporal scales of publicly available big data. The benefits of publicly available big data become clear when looking at issues such as the development and quality of life in informal settlements within and around major African cities. Sub-Saharan African (SSA) cities are among the fastest growing urban areas in the world. However, they lack spatial information to guide urban planning towards climate-adapted cities and fair living conditions for disadvantaged residents who mostly reside in informal settlements. Therefore, this study collected key information on freely available data such as data on land cover, land use, and environmental hazards and pressures, demographic and socio-economic indicators for urban areas. They serve as a vital resource for success of many other related local studies, such as the transdisciplinary research project “DREAMS—Developing REsilient African cities and their urban environMent facing the provision of essential urban SDGs”. In the era of exponential growth of big data analytics, especially geospatial data, their utility in SSA is hampered by the disparate nature of these datasets due to the lack of a comprehensive overview of where and how to access them. This paper aims to provide transparency in this regard as well as a resource to access such datasets. Although the limitations of such big data are also discussed, their usefulness in assessing environmental hazards and human exposure, especially to climate change impacts, are emphasised. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop