Special Issue "Land, Innovation, and Social Good"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kwabena Asiama
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geodetic Institute, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodetic Science, Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany
Interests: property valuation; participatory geo-information science; land use planning
Dr. Rohan Bennett
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Business Technology and Entrepreneurship, Swinburne Business School, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122, Australia
Interests: ICT4D; land informatics; digital business
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Christiaan Lemmen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Professor of Land Information Modelling, University of Twente; Senior Geodetic Advisor at Kadaster International, The Netherlands
Interests: land administration; cadastre; land information systems and modelling; pro-poor land recordation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Winrich Voss
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geodetic Institute, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodetic Science, Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany.
Interests: land use planning; land management; land valuation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The administration of land tenure, value, and use is undergoing a new wave of technological innovation. The maturation and scaled implementation of crowdsourced data capture techniques, imagery-based mapping approaches, and cloud storage options are all adding to the expanded land administration toolbox. Meanwhile, a mix of even more novel developments is under development, including adoption of big data capture feeding into artificial intelligence applications, including automatic parcel boundary extraction, automated valuation models, mass valuation, and computer-assisted land use planning decision support systems for smart cities. Countering these positive developments in the land administration domain are ongoing challenges relating to land rights inequality, slum formation, food insecurity, and exposure to disasters, amongst others. The challenge remains to better harness technological advancement to better support fair and responsible relationships between people and land.

This Special Issue focuses on how innovative approaches to land tenure, land value, and land use planning can directly contribute, both positively and negatively, to these societal issues at local, national, and global levels.

We invite papers that link innovative technologies in the areas of land tenure administration, land value modeling, and land use planning to specific societal problems such as climate change, land tenure insecurity, gender access to land, rapid urbanization, food security, and poverty reduction.

Dr. Kwabena Asiam
Dr. Rohan Bennett
Prof. Dr. Chrit Lemmen
Prof. Dr. Winrich Voss
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land tenure
  • land value modeling
  • land use planning
  • artificial intelligence
  • decision support systems

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Land, Innovation, and Social Good
Land 2021, 10(5), 503; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050503 - 08 May 2021
Viewed by 379
Abstract
The administration of land tenure, value, and use is undergoing a new wave of technological innovation [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Research

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Communication
History and Prospects for African Land Governance: Institutions, Technology and ‘Land Rights for All’
Land 2021, 10(3), 292; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10030292 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 618
Abstract
Issues relating to land are specifically referred to in five of the United Nations’ (UN) 17 Sustainable Development Goals, and UN-Habitat’s Global Land Tools Network views access to land and tenure security as key to achieving sustainable, inclusive and efficient cities. The African [...] Read more.
Issues relating to land are specifically referred to in five of the United Nations’ (UN) 17 Sustainable Development Goals, and UN-Habitat’s Global Land Tools Network views access to land and tenure security as key to achieving sustainable, inclusive and efficient cities. The African continent is growing in importance, with climate change and population pressure on land. This review explores an interdisciplinary approach, and identifies recent advances in geo-spatial technology relevant to land governance in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It discusses historical legacies of colonialism that affect the culture of its land administration institutions, through three levels of governance: international/regional, national and sub-national. Short narratives on land law are discussed for four Anglophone former British colonies of SSA. A wide range of sources are drawn upon: academic research across disciplines, and official publications of various actors, including land professions (particularly surveyors, lawyers and planners), government and wider society. The findings are that African countries have carried forward colonial land governance structures into the post-independence political settlement, and that a gulf exists between the institutions, language and cultures of land governance, and the mass of its peoples struggling with basic issues of survival. This gulf may be addressed by recent approaches to land administration and technological advances in geo-spatial technology, and by new knowledge networks and interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
Article
Hybrid Approaches for Smart Contracts in Land Administration: Lessons from Three Blockchain Proofs-of-Concept
Land 2021, 10(2), 220; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020220 - 22 Feb 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1540
Abstract
The emergence of “blockchain” technology as an alternative data management technique has spawned a myriad of conceptual and logical design work across multiple industries and sectors. It is also argued to enable operationalisation of the earlier “smart contract” concept. The domain of land [...] Read more.
The emergence of “blockchain” technology as an alternative data management technique has spawned a myriad of conceptual and logical design work across multiple industries and sectors. It is also argued to enable operationalisation of the earlier “smart contract” concept. The domain of land administration has actively investigated these opportunities, albeit also largely at the conceptual level, and usually with a whole-of-sector or “big bang” industry transformation perspective. Less reporting of applied case applications is evident, particularly those undertaken in collaboration with practicing land sector actors. That said, pilots and test cases continue to act as a basis for understanding the relative merits, drawbacks, and implementation challenges of the smart contract concept in land administration. In this vein, this paper extends upon and further refines the existing discourse on smart contracts within the land sector, by giving an updated, if not more nuanced, view of example applications, opportunities, and barriers. In contrast to the earlier works, a hybrid solution that mixes smart contract use with existing technology infrastructure—enabling preservation of the role of a land registry agency as the ultimate arbiter of valid claims—is proposed. This is hypothesised to minimise disruptions, whilst maximising the benefits. Examination of proof-of-concept work on smart contract and blockchain applications in Sweden, Australia (State of New South Wales), and Canada (Province of British Columbia) is undertaken. Comparative analysis is undertaken using several frameworks including: (i) business requirements adherence, (ii) technology readiness and maturity assessment, and (iii) strategic grid analysis. Results show that the hybrid approach enables adherence to land dealing business requirements and that the proofs-of-concept are a necessary step in the development trajectory. Furthering the uptake will likely depend on again taking a whole-of-sector perspective, and attending to remaining issues around business models, stakeholder acceptance, partnerships and trust building, and legal issues linked to data decentralisation and security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Article
Gender, Land and Food Access in Ghana’s Suburban Cities: A Case of the Adenta Municipality
Land 2020, 9(11), 427; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9110427 - 31 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 755
Abstract
The disparity in land and food access in Ghana often overlooks the possibility of an underlying gender disparity. This paper explores and interrogates the disparity between land and food access with respect to gender and the evolution of this relationship over the years [...] Read more.
The disparity in land and food access in Ghana often overlooks the possibility of an underlying gender disparity. This paper explores and interrogates the disparity between land and food access with respect to gender and the evolution of this relationship over the years as a result of the settlement expansion and urban growth within the Adenta Municipality in Ghana. Adopting a mixed pairwise approach of combining spatial analytical tools, vulnerability indexing and resilient indicators, the paper examines the levels and rates of land accessibilities within the stream of modern cities. It assesses the land market system complexities within developing economies and attempts to address the potential threats of gender-land access gaps. The paper finally assigns weights of ranks to model the phenomenon and recommends trends that can facilitate predictions and early cautionary systems for effective urban land governance in Ghana. The paper concludes that though it is noticed that women engage in power structures on a daily basis, this both benefits and burdens them, depending on their socio-cultural status and other factors in terms of access to land and food. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Article
Evaluation of the Objectives and Concerns of Farmers to Apply Different Agricultural Managements in Olive Groves: The Case of Estepa Region (Southern, Spain)
Land 2020, 9(10), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100366 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 680
Abstract
Olive groves are representative of the landscape and culture of Spain. They occupy 2.5 M ha (1.5 M ha in Andalusia) and are characterised by their multifunctionality. In recent years, socio-economic and environmental factors (i.e., erosion) have compromised their sustainability, leading farmers to [...] Read more.
Olive groves are representative of the landscape and culture of Spain. They occupy 2.5 M ha (1.5 M ha in Andalusia) and are characterised by their multifunctionality. In recent years, socio-economic and environmental factors (i.e., erosion) have compromised their sustainability, leading farmers to abandon their farms or intensify their management. The main objective/purpose of this research was to study the drivers and concerns that condition farmers’ choice of a given olive grove management model. Taking the Estepa region as a case study (Andalusia, Spain), surveys were conducted among farmers with integrated and organic managed olive groves. The socio-economic aspects were the main objectives and concerns of the farmers with integrated olive groves. In the case of farmers with organic management, conservation objectives prevailed, and their concerns were oriented to environmental threats. The education level was a key factor in the adoption of given farm management, as it increased the level of environmental awareness. In the context of multifunctional agriculture, it would be desirable to increase this awareness of the environmental threats against olive groves, in order to provide incentives for the implementation of agri-environmental practices that would enhance the sustainability of these systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Article
Could Mapping Initiatives Catalyze the Interpretation of Customary Land Rights in Ways that Secure Women’s Land Rights?
Land 2020, 9(10), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100344 - 23 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 933
Abstract
Although land forms the basis for marginal livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa, the asset is more strategic for women as they usually hold derived and dependent rights to land in customary tenure areas. Initiatives to secure women’s land tenure in customary areas are undermined [...] Read more.
Although land forms the basis for marginal livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa, the asset is more strategic for women as they usually hold derived and dependent rights to land in customary tenure areas. Initiatives to secure women’s land tenure in customary areas are undermined by the social embeddedness of the rights, patriarchy, lack of awareness by the communities, legal pluralism, and challenges of recording the rights. As pressure on customary land tenure increases due to foreign and local land-based investment interests, land titling initiatives, tourism, and mineral resources exploration, communities and women within them are at real risk of losing their land, the basis of their livelihoods. Women stand to lose more as they hold tenuous land rights in customary land tenure areas. Accordingly, this study analyzes case studies of selected mapping initiatives in Sub-Saharan Africa to interrogate the extent to which mapping both as a cadastral exercise and emerging practice in the initiation of participatory land governance initiatives, catalyze the transmission of customary land rights in ways that have a positive impact on women’s access to land in customary land tenure areas. The results indicate that mapping initiatives generate opportunities, innovations, and novel spaces for securing women’s access to land in customary tenure areas which include catalyzing legislative changes and facilitating technology transfer, increasing awareness of women’s interests, providing opportunities for women to participate in decision-making forums, providing a basis for securing statutory recognition for their land rights, and improving natural resource stewardship. The potential challenges include the community’s capacity to sustain the initiatives, the expense of the technology and software, widespread illiteracy of women, power asymmetries and bias of the mapping experts, increased vulnerability of mapped land to exploitation, the legal status of the maps in the host community and /or country, compatibility with existing land recording systems, statutory bias in recording land rights and the potential of mapping initiatives to unearth existing land boundary conflicts. These challenges can be mediated by sensitive planning and management to ensure real and sustainable land tenure security for women. The paper contributes to debates around customary land tenure dynamics, specifically the issues pertaining to registration of primary and derived customary rights to land. These includes policy debates and choices to be made about how best to secure tenuous customary land rights of women and other vulnerable people. The paper also contributes to our understanding of what instruments in land registration toolkits might strengthen women’s land rights and the conditions under which this could be done. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
Article
Evaluation of the Completeness of Spatial Data Infrastructure in the Context of Cadastral Data Sharing
Land 2020, 9(8), 272; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9080272 - 14 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 827
Abstract
The idea behind the Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe (INSPIRE) project was to provide EU citizens with access to various types of information, including environmental protection and spatial management data. These resources can be viewed (Web Map Service—WMS) and downloaded (Web Feature [...] Read more.
The idea behind the Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe (INSPIRE) project was to provide EU citizens with access to various types of information, including environmental protection and spatial management data. These resources can be viewed (Web Map Service—WMS) and downloaded (Web Feature Service—WFS) online. Cadastral datasets represent one of the 34 spatial data themes in the spatial data infrastructure (SDI). The functionality of the SDI has not yet been fully achieved due to the failure of the WMS and WFS network services. The aim of this article was to assess the completeness of the SDI containing cadastral datasets. The present study has practical implications. The proposed diagnostic tool supports an assessment of the completeness of SDI resources in seven diagnostic groups (technical and legal identifiers, the cadastral information profile, the WMS network service, the WFS network service, source cadastral databases, data validity, and WMS and WFS standardization). The developed assessment methodology enables the identification of websites that publish cadastral data through INSPIRE network services, as well as problematic websites, and it has high development potential. The results of the assessment should be used in the ongoing construction of the SDI. They can also be used to improve the quality of network services and their availability for end users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Article
Land Registration, Adjustment Experience, and Agricultural Machinery Adoption: Empirical Analysis from Rural China
Land 2020, 9(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9030089 - 17 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1316
Abstract
Land property security and advanced factor inputs play critical roles in agricultural modernization in developing countries. However, there are unclear relationships between land property security and advanced factor inputs. This study aims to clarify these relationships from the perspective of the differentiation of [...] Read more.
Land property security and advanced factor inputs play critical roles in agricultural modernization in developing countries. However, there are unclear relationships between land property security and advanced factor inputs. This study aims to clarify these relationships from the perspective of the differentiation of the realization process of land property security. From the perspective of property rights theory and endowment effects, data from 2934 farming households in rural China are used to determine the quantitative impacts of land registration and adjustment experience on the adoption of agricultural machinery. The results are as follows: (i) Land registration does not affect the adoption of agricultural machinery. (ii) Adjustment experience has a negative impact on the adoption of agricultural machinery. (iii) The interaction of land registration and adjustment experience has a positive impact on the adoption of agricultural machinery. This study provides some policy references with which developing countries can achieve agricultural modernization and revitalize the countryside by improving property rights security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Article
Improving Infrastructure Installation Planning Processes using Procedural Modeling
Land 2020, 9(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9020048 - 10 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1054
Abstract
Time and costs are often the most critical constraints in implementing a development impact fee (DIF) for local infrastructure installation planning in South Korea. For this reason, drafting quality plan alternatives and calculating precise DIFs for improvement remain challenging. This study proposes an [...] Read more.
Time and costs are often the most critical constraints in implementing a development impact fee (DIF) for local infrastructure installation planning in South Korea. For this reason, drafting quality plan alternatives and calculating precise DIFs for improvement remain challenging. This study proposes an application of a procedural modeling method using CityEngine as an alternative to traditional methods, which rely on AutoCAD. A virtual low-density suburban development project in Jeju, South Korea was used to compare the workability of the two methods. The findings suggest that procedural modeling outperforms the other approach by significantly reducing the number of steps and commands required in the planning process. This paper also argues that procedural modeling provides real-time 2- and 3-dimensional modeling and design evaluation and allows for a more efficient assessment of plan quality and calculation of DIF. We also argue for the need to diffuse procedural modeling to better support local planning practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Article
Innovating Along the Continuum of Land Rights Recognition: Meridia’s “Documentation Packages” for Ghana
Land 2019, 8(12), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8120189 - 09 Dec 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1443
Abstract
Documentation of land rights can ensure tenure security and facilitate smooth land transactions, but in most countries of the global south this has been difficult to achieve. These difficulties are related to the high transaction cost, long transaction times, and procedural rigidity of [...] Read more.
Documentation of land rights can ensure tenure security and facilitate smooth land transactions, but in most countries of the global south this has been difficult to achieve. These difficulties are related to the high transaction cost, long transaction times, and procedural rigidity of land registration processes. In response to these problems, innovative approaches of tenure documentation have been conceived at a global level and are being promoted in many countries of the global south. Little is known yet about how such innovative land tenure documentation approaches unfold in various contexts and to what effect. The implementation of innovative approaches is challenging, due to the legal pluralistic nature of land governance and administrative hybridity in many countries of the global south, including the West African region. This qualitative study explores how Meridia, a small for-profit company, develops innovative approaches to register land rights in the form of “documentation packages” within the existing institutional setting of Ghana. In the paper, we describe both the processes of preparing the documentation packages and respective actors involved, as well as the nature of encounters between innovative interventions and existing institutions. Meridia develops specific products in response to both the regional diversity of land tenure, uses, and market demands, as well as in response to the challenges that the institutional context poses to the process of land tenure registration. As such, the case illustrates how innovation evolves in step-by-step fashion through negotiations with existing land institutions. The various documentation packages developed in this manner differ in terms of cost and complexity of preparation, in terms of recognition by customary and statutory institutions, as well as in the usability of the issued certificates and the extent of exchangeability of associated land parcels. Therefore, Meridia’s product innovation reflects the continuum of land rights, but it also poses questions for future research regarding the political economy of land tenure certification and regarding the actual uses and benefits of issued certificates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Article
Capitalising on the European Research Outcome for Improved Spatial Planning Practices and Territorial Governance
Land 2019, 8(11), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8110163 - 01 Nov 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 971
Abstract
If distinguishing between spatial planning systems and practices, the latter reflect on the continuity and perspective of planning cultures and are concerned with the values, attitudes, mindsets and routines shared by those taking part in concrete planning processes. Some recent studies demonstrated comparative [...] Read more.
If distinguishing between spatial planning systems and practices, the latter reflect on the continuity and perspective of planning cultures and are concerned with the values, attitudes, mindsets and routines shared by those taking part in concrete planning processes. Some recent studies demonstrated comparative assessment of European spatial planning. Thus, the coexistence of continuity and change, as well as convergence and divergence concerning planning practices, was delineated. Moreover, the trends and directions in the evolution of spatial planning and territorial governance were explored when focusing on linkages between diverse national planning perspectives and EU policies. The relevant outcome of European projects met their visionary statements in general and are towards the inspiration of policymaking by territorial evidence. However, it showed a highly differential landscape for territorial governance and spatial planning across Europe in terms of terminology, concepts, tools and practices. Therefore, the paper focuses on how the most relevant outcome of European research may initiate a reasonable in-depth study of concrete planning practices and substantiate an effective planning approach. Mainly based on critical literature review and comparative analysis and synthesis techniques, the overviewed key research results led (1) to agenda-setting for comprehensive evidence gathering (CEG) if exploring spatial planning practices and territorial governance in selected European countries, and (2) to a set of objectives for a values-led planning (VLP) approach to be introduced for improvement of land use management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Review

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Review
Farmland Fragmentation, Farmland Consolidation and Food Security: Relationships, Research Lapses and Future Perspectives
Land 2021, 10(2), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020129 - 29 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 860
Abstract
Farmland fragmentation and farmland consolidation are two sides of the same coin paradoxically viewed as farmland management tools. While there is a vast body of literature addressing the connections between farmland fragmentation and farmland consolidation on the one hand and agriculture production and [...] Read more.
Farmland fragmentation and farmland consolidation are two sides of the same coin paradoxically viewed as farmland management tools. While there is a vast body of literature addressing the connections between farmland fragmentation and farmland consolidation on the one hand and agriculture production and crops diversification on the other hand, their relationship with variations in food security is still under-explored. This challenges policy makers about whether and how to devise policies in favor of fragmentation conservation or defragmentation. Therefore, drawing on the multiple secondary data and the deductive logical reasoning through an integrative concept-centric qualitative approach following the rationalist theory, this study critically reviews and analyses the existing body of literature to identify how farmland fragmentation versus defragmentation approaches relate to food security. The goal is to develop and derive an explicit model indicating when, where, how and why farmland fragmentation can be conserved or prevented and controlled for food security motives as a novel alternative comprehensive scientific knowledge generation, which could guide and inform the design of future research and policies about farmland fragmentation management. The findings show that both fragmentation and consolidation variously (positively and negatively) impact on food security at different (macro, meso and micro) levels. While farmland fragmentation is highly linked with food diversification (food quality), acceptability, accessibility, and sovereignty at the local (household and individual) levels, farmland consolidation is often associated with the quantity and availability of food production at the community, regional and national levels. Theoretically, the best management of farmland fragmentation for food security purposes can be achieved by minimizing the problems associated with physical and tenure aspects of farmland fragmentation along with the optimization of its potential benefits. In this regard, farmland consolidation, voluntary parcel exchange and on-field harvest sales, farmland realignment, and farmland use (crop) consolidation can be suitable for the control of physical fragmentation problems under various local conditions. Similarly, farmland banking and off-farm employment, restrictions about the minimum parcel sizes subdivision and absentee owners, joint ownership, cooperative farming, farmland use (crop) consolidation, agricultural land protection policies, and family planning measures can be suitable to prevent and minimize farmland tenure fragmentation problems. On the other hand, various agriculture intensification programs, agroecogical approaches, and land saving technologies can be the most suitable strategies to maximize the income from agriculture on fragmented plots under the circumstances of beneficial fragmentation. Moreover, in areas where both rational and defective fragmentation scenarios coexist, different specific strategies like localized and multicropping based land consolidation approaches in combination with or without agriculture intensification programs, can provide better and more balanced optimal solutions. These could simultaneously minimize the defective effects of fragmentation thereby optimizing or without jeopardizing its potential benefits with regard to food security under specific local conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Review
Transparency of Land Administration and the Role of Blockchain Technology, a Four-Dimensional Framework Analysis from the Ghanaian Land Perspective
Land 2020, 9(12), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9120491 - 03 Dec 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1180
Abstract
Existing studies on blockchain within land administration have focused mainly on replacing or complementing the technology for land registration and titling. This study explores the potential of using blockchain technology to enhance the transparency of all land administration processes using an integrative review [...] Read more.
Existing studies on blockchain within land administration have focused mainly on replacing or complementing the technology for land registration and titling. This study explores the potential of using blockchain technology to enhance the transparency of all land administration processes using an integrative review methodology coupled with a framework analysis. This study draws on the Ghanaian land administration perspective to make this insightful. It appears possible to apply a permissionless public blockchain across all land administration processes. This integrates all departments, processes, and stakeholders of land administration to enhance openness, improve availability and accessibility to information, and foster participation for transparency simultaneously. This can change the transparency variation in land administration to be more equal and homogenous regardless of land type. This, however, depends on the standardization of processes across the divisions, as well as negotiation and consensus amongst all stakeholders, especially with chiefs. Limitations include: limited storage and scalability, as well as huge electricity consumption for operation. This study’s policy implications are a review of all paper-based land transactions, a comprehensive digitization of land administration processes, public–private partnership on blockchain-based land administration, and professionals and stakeholder education on the technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Review
Towards Responsible Consolidation of Customary Lands: A Research Synthesis
Land 2019, 8(11), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8110161 - 29 Oct 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1534
Abstract
The use of land consolidation on customary lands has been limited, though land fragmentation persists. Land fragmentation on customary lands has two main causes—the nature of the customary land tenure system, and the somewhat linked agricultural system. Since attempts to increase food productivity [...] Read more.
The use of land consolidation on customary lands has been limited, though land fragmentation persists. Land fragmentation on customary lands has two main causes—the nature of the customary land tenure system, and the somewhat linked agricultural system. Since attempts to increase food productivity on customary lands have involved fertilisation and mechanisation on the small and scattered farmlands, these approaches have fallen short of increasing food productivity. A study to develop a responsible approach to land consolidation on customary lands using a design research approach is undertaken and reported here. Based on a comparative study, it is found that three factors inhibit the development of a responsible land consolidation approach on customary lands—the coverage of a land administration system, a land valuation approach, and a land reallocation approach the fits the customary land tenure system. To fill these gaps, firstly, this study developed the participatory land administration that brought together traditional land administration approaches with emerging bottom-up approaches, as well as technological advances that drive these approaches together with the growing societal needs. Secondly, a valuation approach was developed to enable the comparison of the farmlands in rural areas that are without land markets. Finally, a land reallocation approach was developed based on the political, economic and social, as well as technical and legal characteristics of rural customary farmlands. This study concludes that though the land consolidation strategy developed is significantly able to reduce land fragmentation, both physical and land tenure, the local customs are an obstruction to the technical processes to achieve the best form of farmland structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Other

Project Report
Participatory Land Administration in Indonesia: Quality and Usability Assessment
Land 2020, 9(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9030079 - 09 Mar 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2418
Abstract
This paper presents the results from a quality and usability analysis of participatory land registration (PaLaR) in Indonesia’s rural areas, focusing on data quality, cost, and time. PaLaR was designed as a systematic community-centered land titling project collecting requisite spatial and legal data. [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results from a quality and usability analysis of participatory land registration (PaLaR) in Indonesia’s rural areas, focusing on data quality, cost, and time. PaLaR was designed as a systematic community-centered land titling project collecting requisite spatial and legal data. PaLaR was piloted in two communities situated in Tanggamus and Grobogan districts in Indonesia. The research compared spatial data accuracy between two approaches, PaLaR and the normal systematic land registration approach (PTSL) with respect to point accuracy and polygon area. Supplementary observations and interviews were undertaken in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the spatial and legal data collection, as well as logical consistency of the data collected by the community committee, using a mobile application. Although the two pilots showed a lower spatial accuracy than the normal method (PTSL), PaLaR better suited local circumstances and still delivered complete spatial and legal data in a more effective means. The accuracy and efficiency of spatial data collection could be improved through the use of more accurate GNSS antennas and a seamless connection to the national land databases. The PaLaR method is dependent on, amongst other aspects, inclusive and flexible community awareness programs, as well as the committed participation of the community and local offices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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