Special Issue "Land, Innovation, and Social Good"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Kwabena Asiama
Website
Guest Editor
Geodetic Institute, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodetic Science, Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany
Interests: property valuation; participatory geo-information science; land use planning
Dr. Rohan Bennett
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Business Technology and Entrepreneurship, Swinburne Business School, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
Interests: ICT4D; Land Informatics; Digital Business
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Christiaan Lemmen
Website
Guest Editor
Professor of Land Information Modelling, University of Twente; Senior Geodetic Advisor at Kadaster International, The Netherlands
Interests: land administration; cadastre; land information systems and modelling; pro-poor land recordation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Winrich Voss
Website
Guest Editor
Geodetic Institute, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodetic Science, Leibniz University of Hannover, Germany.
Interests: land use planning; land management; land valuation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The administration of land tenure, value, and use is undergoing a new wave of technological innovation. The maturation and scaled implementation of crowdsourced data capture techniques, imagery-based mapping approaches, and cloud storage options are all adding to the expanded land administration toolbox. Meanwhile, a mix of even more novel developments is under development, including adoption of big data capture feeding into artificial intelligence applications, including automatic parcel boundary extraction, automated valuation models, mass valuation, and computer-assisted land use planning decision support systems for smart cities. Countering these positive developments in the land administration domain are ongoing challenges relating to land rights inequality, slum formation, food insecurity, and exposure to disasters, amongst others. The challenge remains to better harness technological advancement to better support fair and responsible relationships between people and land.

This Special Issue focuses on how innovative approaches to land tenure, land value, and land use planning can directly contribute, both positively and negatively, to these societal issues at local, national, and global levels.

We invite papers that link innovative technologies in the areas of land tenure administration, land value modeling, and land use planning to specific societal problems such as climate change, land tenure insecurity, gender access to land, rapid urbanization, food security, and poverty reduction.

Dr. Kwabena Asiam
Dr. Rohan Bennett
Prof. Dr. Chrit Lemmen
Prof. Dr. Winrich Voss
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land tenure
  • land value modeling
  • land use planning
  • artificial intelligence
  • decision support systems

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Land Registration, Adjustment Experience, and Agricultural Machinery Adoption: Empirical Analysis from Rural China
Land 2020, 9(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9030089 - 17 Mar 2020
Abstract
Land property security and advanced factor inputs play critical roles in agricultural modernization in developing countries. However, there are unclear relationships between land property security and advanced factor inputs. This study aims to clarify these relationships from the perspective of the differentiation of [...] Read more.
Land property security and advanced factor inputs play critical roles in agricultural modernization in developing countries. However, there are unclear relationships between land property security and advanced factor inputs. This study aims to clarify these relationships from the perspective of the differentiation of the realization process of land property security. From the perspective of property rights theory and endowment effects, data from 2934 farming households in rural China are used to determine the quantitative impacts of land registration and adjustment experience on the adoption of agricultural machinery. The results are as follows: (i) Land registration does not affect the adoption of agricultural machinery. (ii) Adjustment experience has a negative impact on the adoption of agricultural machinery. (iii) The interaction of land registration and adjustment experience has a positive impact on the adoption of agricultural machinery. This study provides some policy references with which developing countries can achieve agricultural modernization and revitalize the countryside by improving property rights security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Open AccessArticle
Improving Infrastructure Installation Planning Processes using Procedural Modeling
Land 2020, 9(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9020048 - 10 Feb 2020
Abstract
Time and costs are often the most critical constraints in implementing a development impact fee (DIF) for local infrastructure installation planning in South Korea. For this reason, drafting quality plan alternatives and calculating precise DIFs for improvement remain challenging. This study proposes an [...] Read more.
Time and costs are often the most critical constraints in implementing a development impact fee (DIF) for local infrastructure installation planning in South Korea. For this reason, drafting quality plan alternatives and calculating precise DIFs for improvement remain challenging. This study proposes an application of a procedural modeling method using CityEngine as an alternative to traditional methods, which rely on AutoCAD. A virtual low-density suburban development project in Jeju, South Korea was used to compare the workability of the two methods. The findings suggest that procedural modeling outperforms the other approach by significantly reducing the number of steps and commands required in the planning process. This paper also argues that procedural modeling provides real-time 2- and 3-dimensional modeling and design evaluation and allows for a more efficient assessment of plan quality and calculation of DIF. We also argue for the need to diffuse procedural modeling to better support local planning practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Open AccessArticle
Innovating Along the Continuum of Land Rights Recognition: Meridia’s “Documentation Packages” for Ghana
Land 2019, 8(12), 189; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8120189 - 09 Dec 2019
Abstract
Documentation of land rights can ensure tenure security and facilitate smooth land transactions, but in most countries of the global south this has been difficult to achieve. These difficulties are related to the high transaction cost, long transaction times, and procedural rigidity of [...] Read more.
Documentation of land rights can ensure tenure security and facilitate smooth land transactions, but in most countries of the global south this has been difficult to achieve. These difficulties are related to the high transaction cost, long transaction times, and procedural rigidity of land registration processes. In response to these problems, innovative approaches of tenure documentation have been conceived at a global level and are being promoted in many countries of the global south. Little is known yet about how such innovative land tenure documentation approaches unfold in various contexts and to what effect. The implementation of innovative approaches is challenging, due to the legal pluralistic nature of land governance and administrative hybridity in many countries of the global south, including the West African region. This qualitative study explores how Meridia, a small for-profit company, develops innovative approaches to register land rights in the form of “documentation packages” within the existing institutional setting of Ghana. In the paper, we describe both the processes of preparing the documentation packages and respective actors involved, as well as the nature of encounters between innovative interventions and existing institutions. Meridia develops specific products in response to both the regional diversity of land tenure, uses, and market demands, as well as in response to the challenges that the institutional context poses to the process of land tenure registration. As such, the case illustrates how innovation evolves in step-by-step fashion through negotiations with existing land institutions. The various documentation packages developed in this manner differ in terms of cost and complexity of preparation, in terms of recognition by customary and statutory institutions, as well as in the usability of the issued certificates and the extent of exchangeability of associated land parcels. Therefore, Meridia’s product innovation reflects the continuum of land rights, but it also poses questions for future research regarding the political economy of land tenure certification and regarding the actual uses and benefits of issued certificates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Open AccessArticle
Capitalising on the European Research Outcome for Improved Spatial Planning Practices and Territorial Governance
Land 2019, 8(11), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8110163 - 01 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
If distinguishing between spatial planning systems and practices, the latter reflect on the continuity and perspective of planning cultures and are concerned with the values, attitudes, mindsets and routines shared by those taking part in concrete planning processes. Some recent studies demonstrated comparative [...] Read more.
If distinguishing between spatial planning systems and practices, the latter reflect on the continuity and perspective of planning cultures and are concerned with the values, attitudes, mindsets and routines shared by those taking part in concrete planning processes. Some recent studies demonstrated comparative assessment of European spatial planning. Thus, the coexistence of continuity and change, as well as convergence and divergence concerning planning practices, was delineated. Moreover, the trends and directions in the evolution of spatial planning and territorial governance were explored when focusing on linkages between diverse national planning perspectives and EU policies. The relevant outcome of European projects met their visionary statements in general and are towards the inspiration of policymaking by territorial evidence. However, it showed a highly differential landscape for territorial governance and spatial planning across Europe in terms of terminology, concepts, tools and practices. Therefore, the paper focuses on how the most relevant outcome of European research may initiate a reasonable in-depth study of concrete planning practices and substantiate an effective planning approach. Mainly based on critical literature review and comparative analysis and synthesis techniques, the overviewed key research results led (1) to agenda-setting for comprehensive evidence gathering (CEG) if exploring spatial planning practices and territorial governance in selected European countries, and (2) to a set of objectives for a values-led planning (VLP) approach to be introduced for improvement of land use management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Towards Responsible Consolidation of Customary Lands: A Research Synthesis
Land 2019, 8(11), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8110161 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
The use of land consolidation on customary lands has been limited, though land fragmentation persists. Land fragmentation on customary lands has two main causes—the nature of the customary land tenure system, and the somewhat linked agricultural system. Since attempts to increase food productivity [...] Read more.
The use of land consolidation on customary lands has been limited, though land fragmentation persists. Land fragmentation on customary lands has two main causes—the nature of the customary land tenure system, and the somewhat linked agricultural system. Since attempts to increase food productivity on customary lands have involved fertilisation and mechanisation on the small and scattered farmlands, these approaches have fallen short of increasing food productivity. A study to develop a responsible approach to land consolidation on customary lands using a design research approach is undertaken and reported here. Based on a comparative study, it is found that three factors inhibit the development of a responsible land consolidation approach on customary lands—the coverage of a land administration system, a land valuation approach, and a land reallocation approach the fits the customary land tenure system. To fill these gaps, firstly, this study developed the participatory land administration that brought together traditional land administration approaches with emerging bottom-up approaches, as well as technological advances that drive these approaches together with the growing societal needs. Secondly, a valuation approach was developed to enable the comparison of the farmlands in rural areas that are without land markets. Finally, a land reallocation approach was developed based on the political, economic and social, as well as technical and legal characteristics of rural customary farmlands. This study concludes that though the land consolidation strategy developed is significantly able to reduce land fragmentation, both physical and land tenure, the local customs are an obstruction to the technical processes to achieve the best form of farmland structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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Other

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Open AccessProject Report
Participatory Land Administration in Indonesia: Quality and Usability Assessment
Land 2020, 9(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9030079 - 09 Mar 2020
Abstract
This paper presents the results from a quality and usability analysis of participatory land registration (PaLaR) in Indonesia’s rural areas, focusing on data quality, cost, and time. PaLaR was designed as a systematic community-centered land titling project collecting requisite spatial and legal data. [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results from a quality and usability analysis of participatory land registration (PaLaR) in Indonesia’s rural areas, focusing on data quality, cost, and time. PaLaR was designed as a systematic community-centered land titling project collecting requisite spatial and legal data. PaLaR was piloted in two communities situated in Tanggamus and Grobogan districts in Indonesia. The research compared spatial data accuracy between two approaches, PaLaR and the normal systematic land registration approach (PTSL) with respect to point accuracy and polygon area. Supplementary observations and interviews were undertaken in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the spatial and legal data collection, as well as logical consistency of the data collected by the community committee, using a mobile application. Although the two pilots showed a lower spatial accuracy than the normal method (PTSL), PaLaR better suited local circumstances and still delivered complete spatial and legal data in a more effective means. The accuracy and efficiency of spatial data collection could be improved through the use of more accurate GNSS antennas and a seamless connection to the national land databases. The PaLaR method is dependent on, amongst other aspects, inclusive and flexible community awareness programs, as well as the committed participation of the community and local offices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land, Innovation, and Social Good)
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