Special Issue "Bioenergy and Land"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Floortje van der Hilst
Website
Guest Editor
Copernicus Institute, Utrecht University
Interests: sustainability; land use; bioenergy; land-use change modeling, renewable energy
Dr. Annette Cowie
Website
Guest Editor
NSW Department of Primary Industries, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia
Interests: sustainability indicators; greenhouse gas accounting; soil carbon; bioenergy; biochar
Prof. Daniela Thrän
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Department Bioenergy, Leipzig, Germany
Interests: sustainability; bioenergy; renewable energy systems; bioeconomy; monitoring systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To meet stringent greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets to limit the global temperature rise to well below 2C (preferably 1.5 C) above pre-industrial levels, as agreed upon in the Paris Agreement, large contributions of bioenergy and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) will probably be required. However, there are many sustainability concerns related to bioenergy, such as increased GHG emissions, loss of biodiversity, impacts on water availability and quality, impacts on soils, and socio-economic impacts such as impacts on food-security. The majority of these sustainability issues are related to land-use and land-management changes induced by bioenergy feedstock production. The impacts of land-use and land-management changes highly depend on the biophysical and socio-economic context. Assessments of the sustainability of bioenergy should therefore specifically account for this location-specific context. 

In this Special Issue, we aim to assemble state-of-the-art studies on the integration of bioenergy feedstock production into sustainable landscapes. We invite papers focusing on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • best practices and examples from the field of initiatives that aim to integrate biomass production with other land uses (e.g., agriculture, forestry, conservation);
  • modeling studies that assess sustainable bioenergy potentials and/or impact assessments; and
  • governance approaches and monitoring systems for sustainable biomass production.

The focus of the studies can vary from local to global scales.

Dr. Floortje van der Hilst
Dr. Annette Cowie
Prof. Daniela Thrän
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land use
  • bioenergy
  • sustainability
  • environmental impacts
  • socio-economic impacts
  • sustainable biomass potential
  • land management
  • land use planning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Biodiversity Impacts of Increased Ethanol Production in Brazil
Land 2020, 9(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9010012 - 03 Jan 2020
Abstract
Growing domestic and international ethanol demand is expected to result in increased sugarcane cultivation in Brazil. Sugarcane expansion currently results in land-use changes mainly in the Cerrado and Atlantic Forest biomes, two severely threatened biodiversity hotspots. This study quantifies potential biodiversity impacts of [...] Read more.
Growing domestic and international ethanol demand is expected to result in increased sugarcane cultivation in Brazil. Sugarcane expansion currently results in land-use changes mainly in the Cerrado and Atlantic Forest biomes, two severely threatened biodiversity hotspots. This study quantifies potential biodiversity impacts of increased ethanol demand in Brazil in a spatially explicit manner. We project changes in potential total, threatened, endemic, and range-restricted mammals’ species richness up to 2030. Decreased potential species richness due to increased ethanol demand in 2030 was projected for about 19,000 km2 in the Cerrado, 17,000 km2 in the Atlantic Forest, and 7000 km2 in the Pantanal. In the Cerrado and Atlantic Forest, the biodiversity impacts of sugarcane expansion were mainly due to direct land-use change; in the Pantanal, they were largely due to indirect land-use change. The biodiversity impact of increased ethanol demand was projected to be smaller than the impact of other drivers of land-use change. This study provides a first indication of biodiversity impacts related to increased ethanol production in Brazil, which is useful for policy makers and ethanol producers aiming to mitigate impacts. Future research should assess the impact of potential mitigation options, such as nature protection, agroforestry, or agricultural intensification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioenergy and Land)
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