Special Issue "Climate Adaptation and Biodiversity Conservation"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land–Climate Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sarah Clement
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Planning, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX, United Kingdom
Interests: environmental governance; adaptive governance; Anthropocene; novel ecosystems; climate change; biodiversity conservation; institutional analysis; nature-based solutions; landscape ecology; restoration ecology; social-ecological systems; resilience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The intensity and pace of environmental and socio-economic change that characterise the Anthropocene have created unprecedented challenges for managing ecosystems. Not only have we yet to slow rates of biodiversity loss, but in many places around the world, the pace of extinction and ecosystem decline is accelerating, despite biodiversity loss already being well in excess of sustainable planetary boundaries. Climate change is expected to accelerate biodiversity loss and interact synergistically with other drivers (e.g., habitat loss and degradation, altered biogeochemical regimes, urbanisation), potentially leading to the transformation of ecosystems. This Special Issue will bring together research that provides insights into how ecosystems are changing, how we can expect them to change in the future, and how we might intervene through management, policy, and governance to more effectively adapt to climate change and conserve biodiversity. We welcome articles that fill critical knowledge gaps; offer innovative methods for understanding or managing these environmental challenges; or offer empirical case study examples relating to the science, management, and policy of climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation.

In this Special Issue, we invite papers focusing on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Understanding how climate change is currently affecting ecosystems, and how it is projected to do so in the future;
  • Consideration of how management and ecological restoration may need to change to more effectively deal with climate change and other drivers of biodiversity loss;
  • Evaluations of climate change and/or biodiversity policy and governance;
  • Studies of governance or management effectiveness in these policy areas, particularly with respect to their influence on ecological, social, and economic outcomes;
  • Methods for targeting drivers of biodiversity loss in complex social-ecological systems;
  • Insights into the management of ecosystems that are characterised as novel, hybrid, or heavily modified by humans (including urban ecosystems);
  • Analysis of nature-based solutions or other innovative tools for integrating biodiversity and climate change adaptation into land-use planning.

Dr. Sarah Clement
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biodiversity
  • climate change adaptation
  • Anthropocene
  • social-ecological systems
  • environmental governance
  • adaptive capacity
  • ecosystem change
  • science-based policy
  • nature-based solutions
  • ecological restoration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Combining Tree Species Composition and Understory Coverage Indicators with Optimization Techniques to Address Concerns with Landscape-Level Biodiversity
Land 2021, 10(2), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020126 - 28 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1153
Abstract
Sustainable forest management needs to address biodiversity conservation concerns. For that purpose, forest managers need models and indicators that may help evaluate the impact of management options on biodiversity under the uncertainty of climate change scenarios. In this research we explore the potential [...] Read more.
Sustainable forest management needs to address biodiversity conservation concerns. For that purpose, forest managers need models and indicators that may help evaluate the impact of management options on biodiversity under the uncertainty of climate change scenarios. In this research we explore the potential for designing mosaics of stand-level forest management models to address biodiversity conservation objectives on a broader landscape-level. Our approach integrates (i) an effective stand-level biodiversity indicator that reflect tree species composition, stand age, and understory coverage under divergent climate conditions; and (ii) linear programming optimization techniques to guide forest actors in seeing optimal forest practices to safeguard future biodiversity. Emphasis is on the efficiency and effectiveness of an approach to help assess the impact of forest management planning on biodiversity under scenarios of climate change. Results from a resource capability model are discussed for an application to a large-scale problem encompassing 14,765 ha, extending over a 90-years planning horizon and considering two local-climate scenarios. They highlight the potential of the approach to help assess the impact of both stand and landscape-level forest management models on biodiversity conservation goals. They demonstrate further that the approach provides insights about how climate change, timber demand and wildfire resistance may impact plans that target the optimization of biodiversity values. The set of optimized long-term solutions emphasizes a multifunctional forest that guarantees a desirable local level of biodiversity and resilience to wildfires, while providing a balanced production of wood over time at the landscape scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Adaptation and Biodiversity Conservation)
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Article
Assessing the Impacts of Agriculture and Its Trade on Philippine Biodiversity
Land 2020, 9(11), 403; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9110403 - 23 Oct 2020
Viewed by 1264
Abstract
Many Philippine species are at risk of extinction because of habitat loss and degradation driven by agricultural land use and land-use change. The Philippines is one of the world’s primary banana and pineapple producers. The input-intensive style of plantation agriculture for these typically [...] Read more.
Many Philippine species are at risk of extinction because of habitat loss and degradation driven by agricultural land use and land-use change. The Philippines is one of the world’s primary banana and pineapple producers. The input-intensive style of plantation agriculture for these typically exported crops has many adverse effects on the environment. While global studies have attempted to understand the biodiversity impacts of agricultural goods, there are few studies that have investigated the Philippines specifically. In this study, Philippine policies and data are investigated to better characterize the nexus between agriculture, biodiversity, and trade. An analysis of key national policies highlights that more stringent definitions and protections for biodiversity are needed to recognize the increasing roles that agricultural production, and importantly, its global trade, have on threatened Philippine species. A geographical analysis shows that many banana and pineapple plantations in Mindanao and their surrounding agricultural impact zones overlap with ecologically important areas, such as Protected Areas and Important Bird Areas. Overlaps of recorded species occurrence are observed within the immediate zones surrounding 250 plantations for banana and pineapple in Mindanao, with 83 threatened species of Philippine fauna and tree at risk of exposure to the impacts of intensive agriculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Adaptation and Biodiversity Conservation)
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Article
Typology of Climate Change Adaptation Measures in Polish Cities up to 2030
Land 2020, 9(10), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100351 - 24 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 715
Abstract
Poland, like other countries in the world, increasingly experiences the ongoing climate change. However, the level of preparation of the country and its society for climate change in the second decade of the 21st century can be evaluated as low. The Municipal Adaptation [...] Read more.
Poland, like other countries in the world, increasingly experiences the ongoing climate change. However, the level of preparation of the country and its society for climate change in the second decade of the 21st century can be evaluated as low. The Municipal Adaptation Plans (MAPs) created in 2017–2019 became a subject of research studies whose main goal was to determine the typology of adaptation actions to be undertaken as part of MAPs in the 14 selected Polish cities in various geographical regions. Moreover, the type and scope of intended actions were analysed according to the planned amount of expenditure and from the perspective of sectors. The tasks accepted for implementation up to 2030 mainly relate to modernisation and development of transport systems and to actions connected with physical infrastructure. A large number of tasks and even a bigger scale of financial sources planned in the analysed MAPs for mitigation actions show that Polish cities are at an initial stage of actions for climate protection. The typology of adaptation actions which the work proposes may be helpful in research carried out in countries of a similar level of preparation for adaptation to climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Adaptation and Biodiversity Conservation)
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