Development of Advanced Nanomaterials for Multifunctional Devices: Insights into a Novel Concept of Personalized Medicine

A special issue of Journal of Nanotheranostics (ISSN 2624-845X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 7253

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Politecnico di Milano, Department of Materials, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering “G. Natta”, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: nanomedicine; nanotechnology; nanomaterials; microfabrication; mechanobiology; regeneration; medical devices; cancer

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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering "G. Natta", Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: optical microscopy; fluorescence microscopy; mesenchymal stem cells; mechanobiology; 3D cell growth; micro/nanostructured scaffold

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few decades, nanomaterials have been increasingly applied to a wide range of scientific fields. Importantly, they have gained recognition as fundamental tools for human health improvement. Many efforts have been put into nanotechnology for creating biocompatible multifunctional devices such as nanosensors and advanced noninvasive devices such as wearable electronics. Researchers have developed many platforms for drug delivery and targeted therapy, and imaging techniques, simultaneously providing diagnosis and therapy, have greatly revolutionized conventional medicine. This is defined as nanotheranostics that integrates the advantages of stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, nanocarriers actively targeting diseased tissues, and nanoparticles designed for phototherapy and immunotherapy applications. Nanomedicine has been established as a new discipline achieving many ambitious objectives, displaying its beneficial effects on human well-being and opening the way towards personalized medicine.

This sector represents the new frontier of healthcare: the possibility of stratifying patients in different groups by diagnostic testing and providing them with individual therapies based on their specific molecular and genetic fingerprints has been revealed as invaluable. Importantly, medicine has also been revolutionized by the development of big data analysis, and nowadays many diseases may be prevented, allowing early-stage detection, or may be more easily followed up during therapy.

Dr. Chiara Martinelli
Guest Editor

Dr. Emanuela Jacchetti
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Nanotheranostics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • multifunctional devices
  • nanomedicine
  • theranostics
  • drug delivery
  • targeted therapy
  • personalized medicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 186 KiB  
Editorial
Development of Advanced Nanomaterials for Multifunctional Devices: Insights into a Novel Concept of Personalized Medicine
by Chiara Martinelli and Emanuela Jacchetti
J. Nanotheranostics 2023, 4(1), 35-36; https://doi.org/10.3390/jnt4010002 - 18 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1244
Abstract
The application of biocompatible nanomaterials to simultaneously detect and provide treatment of a disease is referred to as nanotheranostics [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

12 pages, 2652 KiB  
Article
Antibody Delivery into the Brain by Radiosensitizer Nanoparticles for Targeted Glioblastoma Therapy
by Omer Gal, Oshra Betzer, Liat Rousso-Noori, Tamar Sadan, Menachem Motiei, Maxim Nikitin, Dinorah Friedmann-Morvinski, Rachela Popovtzer and Aron Popovtzer
J. Nanotheranostics 2022, 3(4), 177-188; https://doi.org/10.3390/jnt3040012 - 30 Sep 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2932
Abstract
Background: Glioblastoma is the most lethal primary brain malignancy in adults. Standard of care treatment, consisting of temozolomide (TMZ) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), mostly does not prevent local recurrence. The inability of drugs to enter the brain, in particular antibody-based drugs and radiosensitizers, [...] Read more.
Background: Glioblastoma is the most lethal primary brain malignancy in adults. Standard of care treatment, consisting of temozolomide (TMZ) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), mostly does not prevent local recurrence. The inability of drugs to enter the brain, in particular antibody-based drugs and radiosensitizers, is a crucial limitation to effective glioblastoma therapy. Methods: Here, we developed a combined strategy using radiosensitizer gold nanoparticles coated with insulin to cross the blood–brain barrier and shuttle tumor-targeting antibodies (cetuximab) into the brain. Results: Following intravenous injection to an orthotopic glioblastoma mouse model, the nanoparticles specifically accumulated within the tumor. Combining targeted nanoparticle injection with TMZ and RT standard of care significantly inhibited tumor growth and extended survival, as compared to standard of care alone. Histological analysis of tumors showed that the combined treatment eradicated tumor cells, and decreased tumor vascularization, proliferation, and repair. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate radiosensitizer nanoparticles that effectively deliver antibodies into the brain, target the tumor, and effectively improve standard of care treatment outcome in glioblastoma. Full article
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15 pages, 2547 KiB  
Article
Simultaneous Thermal and Spectroscopic Screening of Morphologically Complex Theranostic Gold Nanoparticles
by Suhash Reddy Chavva, Namratha Bhat, Angela Michelle T. San Juan, Siddhant Jaitpal and Samuel Mabbott
J. Nanotheranostics 2022, 3(2), 102-116; https://doi.org/10.3390/jnt3020007 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2177
Abstract
Gold nanoparticles absorb light energy and convert it to thermal energy that transfers to the surrounding environment, making them potentially useful for the hyperthermic treatments well known as photothermal therapy (PTT). Further, it is well documented that noble metal nanoparticles are capable of [...] Read more.
Gold nanoparticles absorb light energy and convert it to thermal energy that transfers to the surrounding environment, making them potentially useful for the hyperthermic treatments well known as photothermal therapy (PTT). Further, it is well documented that noble metal nanoparticles are capable of significantly enhancing the Raman scattering of molecules attached to their surfaces, a technique which is termed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). SERS combined with PTT has the ability to locate nanoparticles at depth and trigger heat production, providing an effective methodology to both seek and destroy diseased tissues. While PTT and SERS are often used in tandem and there are several ways of individually measuring SERS and thermal output, there is currently no method available that pre-screens both properties prior to in vitro or in vivo application. In this work, we have designed a 3D printed platform capable of coupling a commercially available Raman probe to a sample cuvette for SERS and heat output to be monitored simultaneously. We have compared the performance of morphologically complex gold nanoparticles, nanostars (AuNSs) and nanoplates (AuNPLs), which are both well utilized in SERS and photothermal experiments; and measured the SERS activity originating from common Raman reporter analytes 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). We were able to show that the system effectively measures the thermal output and SERS activity of the particles and can evaluate the effect that multiple irradiation cycles have on the SERS signal. Full article
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