Special Issue "Shape Optimization of Engineering Systems for Superior Hydrodynamic Performance"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giuliano Vernengo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Navale, Elettrica, Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni (DITEN), Università degli Studi di Genova, 16145 Genoa, Italy
Interests: Fluid Dynamics; Algorithms; Programming Languages; Transportation Engineering; Ocean Engineering; Naval Engineering
Prof. Dr. Stefano Brizzolara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Kevin T. Crofton Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, Randolph Hall, 332-4, Virginia Tech, 460 Old Turner St., Blacksburg, VA 24061
Interests: numerical hydrodynamics for ship design; advanced marine vehicles; high-performance marine propellers and propulsors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Modern engineering design processes are driven by the quest for ever-increasing performance and higher efficiency and environmental sustainability. Naval architecture and ocean engineering are no exception.

Ocean vehicles, including ships, boats, and faster crafts, their propulsion systems and active control devices, ocean platforms, and energy harvesting devices are the target applications of the parametric design concepts of interest to this Special Issue.

Optimizing the hydrodynamic performance is surely one of the most important domains in the design process of the abovementioned systems, since it intimately affects most of their operational performance metrics and efficiency level.

We propose this Special Issue which focuses on hydrodynamic shape optimization for naval architecture and ocean engineering systems in order to define the state of the art and guide future research efforts. Topics of interest include smart shape representation and modification techniques, such as, e.g., parametric modeling, free form deformation and radial basis functions, and sensitivity and optimization methods spanning from genetic algorithms to set-based design, robust design under uncertainty approaches, and machine learning algorithms.

Examples of both methodological approaches and applications are encouraged in order to capture the state of the art and to orient the research community towards future promising theories, tools, and unconventional concepts.

Dr. Giuliano Vernengo
Prof. Stefano Brizzolara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ocean engineering
  • naval engineering
  • transportation engineering
  • ship resistance and seakeeping
  • planing hulls and hydrofoils
  • simulation based design by optimization (SBDO)
  • fluid dynamics; boundary element methods (BEM)
  • smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Hull Shape Design Optimization with Parameter Space and Model Reductions, and Self-Learning Mesh Morphing
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020185 - 11 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 634
Abstract
In the field of parametric partial differential equations, shape optimization represents a challenging problem due to the required computational resources. In this contribution, a data-driven framework involving multiple reduction techniques is proposed to reduce such computational burden. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and active [...] Read more.
In the field of parametric partial differential equations, shape optimization represents a challenging problem due to the required computational resources. In this contribution, a data-driven framework involving multiple reduction techniques is proposed to reduce such computational burden. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and active subspace genetic algorithm (ASGA) are applied for a dimensional reduction of the original (high fidelity) model and for an efficient genetic optimization based on active subspace property. The parameterization of the shape is applied directly to the computational mesh, propagating the generic deformation map applied to the surface (of the object to optimize) to the mesh nodes using a radial basis function (RBF) interpolation. Thus, topology and quality of the original mesh are preserved, enabling application of POD-based reduced order modeling techniques, and avoiding the necessity of additional meshing steps. Model order reduction is performed coupling POD and Gaussian process regression (GPR) in a data-driven fashion. The framework is validated on a benchmark ship. Full article
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Article
Influence of Impeller Gap Drainage Width on the Performance of Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pump
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020106 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 423
Abstract
The centrifugal pump is one of the most important pieces of energy-consuming equipment in various hydraulic engineering applications. This paper takes a low specific speed centrifugal pump as the research object. Based on the research method combining numerical calculation and experimental verification, the [...] Read more.
The centrifugal pump is one of the most important pieces of energy-consuming equipment in various hydraulic engineering applications. This paper takes a low specific speed centrifugal pump as the research object. Based on the research method combining numerical calculation and experimental verification, the influence of the gap drainage structure on the performance of the low specific speed centrifugal pump and its internal flow field distribution were investigated. The flow field inside the low specific speed centrifugal pump impeller under different gap widths was studied. The comparison between the numerical calculation results and the experimental results confirms that the numerical calculations in this paper have high accuracy. It was found that the gap drainage will reduce the head of the low specific speed centrifugal pump, but increase its hydraulic efficiency. Using a smaller gap width could greatly improve the performance of the low specific speed centrifugal pump on the basis of a slight reduction in the head. The high-pressure leakage flow at the gap flows from the blade pressure surface to the suction surface can effectively suppress the low-pressure area at the impeller inlet. The flow rate of the high-pressure leakage flow increases with the gap width. Excessive gap width may cause a low-pressure zone at the inlet of the previous flow passage. These results could serve as a reference for the subsequent gap design to further improve the operating stability of the low specific speed centrifugal pump. Full article
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Article
Near-Trapping on a Four-Column Structure and the Reduction of Wave Drift Forces Using Optimized Method
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(3), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8030174 - 05 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 521
Abstract
The near-trapping phenomenon, which can lead to high wave elevations and large wave drift forces, is investigated by a floating four-column structure. To solve this wave-structure interaction problem, a numerical model is established by combining the wave interaction theory with a higher-order boundary [...] Read more.
The near-trapping phenomenon, which can lead to high wave elevations and large wave drift forces, is investigated by a floating four-column structure. To solve this wave-structure interaction problem, a numerical model is established by combining the wave interaction theory with a higher-order boundary element method. Based on this numerical model, behaviors of scattered waves at near-trapping conditions are studied; and the superposition principle of free-surface waves is introduced to understand this near-trapping phenomenon. To avoid the near-trapping phenomenon and protect the structure, a way for rotating the structure to change the wave-approach angle is adopted, and improvements of the wave elevations around the structure and the wave drift forces acting on each column are found. Moreover, a genetic-algorithm-based optimization method is adopted in order to minimize the total wave drift force acting on the whole structure at various wavenumbers by controlling the draft of floating bodies, the wave-approach angle and the separation distance between adjacent floating bodies. With the final optimized parameters, the wave drift forces both on each column and on the whole structure can be significantly reduced. The optimized arrangement obtained from a certain wavenumber can work not only at this target wavenumber but also at a range of wavenumbers. Full article
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