Special Issue "Progress in Precision Machining"

A special issue of Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing (ISSN 2504-4494).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Karpuschewski
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Production Engineering, University of Bremen, D-28359 Bremen, Germany
Interests: cutting and abrasive machining, surface integrity aspects; modeling and optimization of manufacturing processes; precision engineering; monitoring and control of machining processes
Dr. Oltmann Riemer
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Production Engineering, University of Bremen, D-28359 Bremen, Germany
Interests: precision engineering; diamond and micromachining processes; polishing and precision grinding processes; surface characterization; manufacture of optical components

Special Issue Information

Precision machining comprises a variety of advanced manufacturing technologies which have developed over the last few decades into flexible, fast, and reliable processes for generating complex high-quality components with functional surfaces and structures. Precision machined parts can be found in products from the automotive, aerospace, and optical industries, as well as medical and communications technologies. In addition to specific high precision machines and advanced tooling, the application of precision machining also requires a fundamental comprehension of processes technology and material behavior as well as metrology and control. 

In this Special Issue of JMMP, we are looking for recent findings, which focus on precision machining technologies including their application and associated research fields. Papers will be considered that show significant advancement according to progress and quality of precision processes, necessary machinery and tools, material aspects, as well as associated metrology with respect to surface properties, surface integrity, and process control.

We are interested in contributions that focus on topics such as:

  • precision and micro machining, including diamond machining, precision grinding and polishing, EDM, and laser beam machining;
  • metrology for high precision characterization of form, structures, and topography of precision machined components;
  • Material aspects in precision machining such as surface and subsurface integrity of precision machined hard and difficult-to-cut materials;
  • Application of process monitoring for sound and robust precision manufacturing technologies.

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Karpuschewski
Dr. Oltmann Riemer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Suppression of Polycrystalline Diamond Tool Wear with Mechanochemical Effects in Micromachining of Ferrous Metal
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2020, 4(3), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp4030081 - 11 Aug 2020
Abstract
A mechanochemical effect is investigated to reduce diamond tool wear by means of applying a surfactant to low-carbon magnetic iron during diamond turning. Orthogonal microcutting demonstrates the manifestation of the mechanochemical effect through the reduction of cutting forces by 30%, which supports the [...] Read more.
A mechanochemical effect is investigated to reduce diamond tool wear by means of applying a surfactant to low-carbon magnetic iron during diamond turning. Orthogonal microcutting demonstrates the manifestation of the mechanochemical effect through the reduction of cutting forces by 30%, which supports the notion of lower cutting temperatures for reduced tribo-chemical wear. This is affirmed by the reduction in tool flank wear by up to 56% with the mechanochemical effect during diamond turning. While wear suppression increases by 9.4–16.15% with feeds from 5–20 μm/rev, it is not proportional to the reduction in cutting forces (31–39.8%), which suggests that the reduction in cutting energy does not directly correspond with the reduction in heat energy to sustain tribo-chemical tool wear. The strain localization during chip formation is proposed to serve as a heat source that hinders the wear mitigation efficiency. Finite element simulations demonstrate the heat generation during strain localization under the mechanochemical effect, which counteracts the reduced heat conversion from the plastic deformation and the transfer from tool–chip contact. Hence, this paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the mechanochemical method and its ability to reduce tool wear, but also establishes its limitations due to its inherent nature for heat generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Progress in Precision Machining)
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