Special Issue "Research on Sports Nutrition: Body Composition and Performance"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142). This special issue belongs to the section "Sport Medicine and Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jose Antonio Website E-Mail
Exercise & Sport Science, Nova Southeastern University, Davie Florida, USA
Phone: 5612391754
Interests: sports supplements; human performance; skeletal muscle plasticity; sports neuroscience

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I have volunteered my time to handle a Special Issue in the Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology. This issue will focus on research in the field of sports nutrition with particular emphasis on body composition and/or performance. The aim of this Special Issue is to attract papers that address the role of sports nutrition in the field of competitive athletics as well as the general population. It is clear that sports nutrition and supplementation plays a significant role vis a vis body composition and human performance. There are several supplements with robust data to support their use such as: beta-alanine, creatine, beet root, protein, caffeine, probiotics etc. Authors are invited to submit original research papers, meta-analyses, and/or systematic reviews.

Prof. Dr. Jose Antonio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sports Supplements
  • Creatine
  • Protein
  • Body Composition
  • Performance
  • Athlete
  • Skeletal Muscle

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Improvement in Muscular Strength in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4030066 - 14 Sep 2019
Abstract
Purpose: This study investigated (1) the effect of a progressive resistance training (PRT) program and whey protein intake on maximal muscle strength in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and (2) alterations in maximal strength 12 wks after the cessation [...] Read more.
Purpose: This study investigated (1) the effect of a progressive resistance training (PRT) program and whey protein intake on maximal muscle strength in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and (2) alterations in maximal strength 12 wks after the cessation of PRT with continued supplementation. Methods: Sixty HIV-infected individuals were recruited. Whole body PRT was performed twice weekly for 12 wks. Participants received, in a double-blind placebo controlled manner, either 20 g whey or placebo (maltodextrin) before and immediately after each session. Both PRT groups continued to take either whey protein or placebo for a further 12 wks following the exercise intervention to examine the effects of detraining. Results: Forty participants (mean and standard deviation (SD) age 40.8 (±7.7) years, weight 70.8 (±16) kg, body mass index (BMI) 30.9 (±7.2) kg m2); whey protein /PRT (n = 13), placebo/PRT (n = 17), and a control group (n = 10) completed the study. A significant main effect for time occurred for the bench press (p = 0.02), the squat (p < 0.0001), the deadlift (p = 0.001) and the shoulder press (p = 0.02) one-repetition maximum (1RM) in the intervention groups. Conclusion: The PRT program increased maximal strength regardless of whey protein intake. The detraining period demonstrated minimal strength loss, which is beneficial to this population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Sports Nutrition: Body Composition and Performance)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effects of an Energy Drink on Psychomotor Vigilance in Trained Individuals
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(3), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4030047 - 22 Jul 2019
Abstract
The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) measures one’s behavioral alertness. It is a visual test that involves measuring the speed at which a person reacts to visual stimuli over a fixed time frame (e.g., 5 min). The purpose of this study was to assess [...] Read more.
The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) measures one’s behavioral alertness. It is a visual test that involves measuring the speed at which a person reacts to visual stimuli over a fixed time frame (e.g., 5 min). The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of an energy drink on psychomotor vigilance as well as a simple measure of muscular endurance (i.e., push-ups). A total of 20 exercise-trained men (n = 11) and women (n = 9) (mean ± SD: age 32 ± 7 years; height 169 ± 10 cm; weight; 74.5 ± 14.5 kg; percent body fat 20.3 ± 6.2%; years of training 14 ± 9; daily caffeine intake 463 ± 510 mg) volunteered for this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. In a randomized counterbalanced order, they consumed either the energy drink (ED) (product: BANG®, Weston Florida) or a similar tasting placebo drink (PL). In the second visit after a 1-week washout period, they consumed the alternate drink. A full 30 min post-consumption, they performed the following tests in this order: a 5-min psychomotor vigilance test, three sets of push-ups, followed once more by a 5-min psychomotor vigilance test. Reaction time was recorded. For the psychomotor vigilance test, lapses, false starts and efficiency score are also assessed. There were no differences between groups for the number of push-ups that were performed or the number of false starts during the psychomotor vigilance test. However, the ED treatment resulted in a significantly lower (i.e., faster) psychomotor vigilance mean reaction time compared to the PL (p = 0.0220) (ED 473.8 ± 42.0 milliseconds, PL 482.4 ± 54.0 milliseconds). There was a trend for the ED to lower the number of lapses (i.e., reaction time > 500 milliseconds) (p = 0.0608). The acute consumption of a commercially available ED produced a significant improvement in psychomotor vigilance in exercise-trained men and women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Sports Nutrition: Body Composition and Performance)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Changes in Fat Mass Following Creatine Supplementation and Resistance Training in Adults ≥50 Years of Age: A Meta-Analysis
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(3), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4030062 - 23 Aug 2019
Abstract
Aging is associated with an increase in fat mass which increases the risk for disease, morbidity and premature mortality. Creatine supplementation in combination with resistance training has been shown to increase lean tissue mass in adults ≥50 years of age; however, the synergetic [...] Read more.
Aging is associated with an increase in fat mass which increases the risk for disease, morbidity and premature mortality. Creatine supplementation in combination with resistance training has been shown to increase lean tissue mass in adults ≥50 years of age; however, the synergetic effects of creatine and resistance training on fat mass in this population are unclear. Creatine metabolism plays an important role in adipose tissue bioenergetics and energy expenditure. Thus, the combination of creatine supplementation and resistance training may decrease fat mass more than resistance training alone. The purpose of this review is two-fold: (1) to perform meta-analyses on studies involving creatine supplementation during resistance training on fat mass in adults ≥50 years of age, and (2) to discuss possible mechanistic actions of creatine on reducing fat mass. Nineteen studies were included in our meta-analysis with 609 participants. Results from the meta-analyses showed that adults ≥50 years of age who supplemented with creatine during resistance training experienced a greater reduction in body fat percentage (0.55%, p = 0.04) compared to those on placebo during resistance training. Despite no statistical difference (p = 0.13), adults supplementing with creatine lost ~0.5 kg more fat mass compared to those on placebo. Interestingly, there are studies which have linked mechanism(s) explaining how creatine may influence fat mass, and these data are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Sports Nutrition: Body Composition and Performance)
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