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Open AccessArticle

Improvement in Muscular Strength in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

1
Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal College of Health Sciences, Durban 4000, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
2
Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, University of KwaZulu-Natal College of Health Sciences, Durban 4013, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
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Department of Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
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Exercise and Sport Science, Nova Southeastern University, Davie FL 33328, USA
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Department of Internal Medicine Durban, University of KwaZulu-Natal College of Health Sciences, Durban 4013, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
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Department of Pulmonology Durban, University of KwaZulu-Natal College of Health Sciences, Durban 4013, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
7
Discipline of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Canberra, Canberra 2617, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4030066
Received: 21 August 2019 / Revised: 11 September 2019 / Accepted: 12 September 2019 / Published: 14 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Sports Nutrition: Body Composition and Performance)
Purpose: This study investigated (1) the effect of a progressive resistance training (PRT) program and whey protein intake on maximal muscle strength in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and (2) alterations in maximal strength 12 wks after the cessation of PRT with continued supplementation. Methods: Sixty HIV-infected individuals were recruited. Whole body PRT was performed twice weekly for 12 wks. Participants received, in a double-blind placebo controlled manner, either 20 g whey or placebo (maltodextrin) before and immediately after each session. Both PRT groups continued to take either whey protein or placebo for a further 12 wks following the exercise intervention to examine the effects of detraining. Results: Forty participants (mean and standard deviation (SD) age 40.8 (±7.7) years, weight 70.8 (±16) kg, body mass index (BMI) 30.9 (±7.2) kg m2); whey protein /PRT (n = 13), placebo/PRT (n = 17), and a control group (n = 10) completed the study. A significant main effect for time occurred for the bench press (p = 0.02), the squat (p < 0.0001), the deadlift (p = 0.001) and the shoulder press (p = 0.02) one-repetition maximum (1RM) in the intervention groups. Conclusion: The PRT program increased maximal strength regardless of whey protein intake. The detraining period demonstrated minimal strength loss, which is beneficial to this population. View Full-Text
Keywords: resistance training; whey; placebo; detraining; HIV; exercise; ART resistance training; whey; placebo; detraining; HIV; exercise; ART
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sookan, T.; Motala, A.; Ormsbee, M.; Antonio, J.; Magula, N.; Lalloo, U.; McKune, A. Improvement in Muscular Strength in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4, 66.

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