Emerging Research Organisms to Study Development

A special issue of Journal of Developmental Biology (ISSN 2221-3759).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2021) | Viewed by 4916

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
Interests: developmental biology; mouse molecular genetics; vision sciences; cellular and molecular mechanisms of retinal regeneration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The past decade has seen a progressive reduction in the cost of genome sequencing that has fortuitously coincided with tremendous breakthroughs in genome editing. As a result, researchers no longer have to choose model organisms based on convenience and available infrastructure. We can now choose model organisms best suited to answer specific biological questions without compromising the ability to perform mechanistic studies. Therefore, the repertoire of novel systems is ever-expanding and provides unprecedented access to biological processes such as regeneration, body plan formation, aging, stress response, and evolution. This Special Issue of the Journal of Developmental Biology will highlight emerging model organisms that are breaking new ground in the study of development and disease. These species may include multicellular animals and fungi, as well as unicellular microorganisms such as bacteria, archaea, and protists. Contributions can be research articles, reviews, and communications papers. Manuscripts reporting truly new model organisms that may not be familiar to most developmental biologists, and whose genomes have yet to be sequenced, are particularly encouraged.

Dr. Ross Poché
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Developmental Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Models organisms
  • Development
  • Mechanistic studies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

21 pages, 4670 KiB  
Review
A New Toolbox in Experimental Embryology—Alternative Model Organisms for Studying Preimplantation Development
by Claudia Springer, Eckhard Wolf and Kilian Simmet
J. Dev. Biol. 2021, 9(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/jdb9020015 - 2 Apr 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3943
Abstract
Preimplantation development is well conserved across mammalian species, but major differences in developmental kinetics, regulation of early lineage differentiation and implantation require studies in different model organisms, especially to better understand human development. Large domestic species, such as cattle and pig, resemble human [...] Read more.
Preimplantation development is well conserved across mammalian species, but major differences in developmental kinetics, regulation of early lineage differentiation and implantation require studies in different model organisms, especially to better understand human development. Large domestic species, such as cattle and pig, resemble human development in many different aspects, i.e., the timing of zygotic genome activation, mechanisms of early lineage differentiations and the period until blastocyst formation. In this article, we give an overview of different assisted reproductive technologies, which are well established in cattle and pig and make them easily accessible to study early embryonic development. We outline the available technologies to create genetically modified models and to modulate lineage differentiation as well as recent methodological developments in genome sequencing and imaging, which form an immense toolbox for research. Finally, we compare the most recent findings in regulation of the first lineage differentiations across species and show how alternative models enhance our understanding of preimplantation development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Research Organisms to Study Development)
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