E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "The Immunology and Biology of Brain Tumors"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Michael Graner

Department Neurosurgery, University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medecal Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 303.724.4133
Interests: targeted immunotherapy of cancer; immunosuppression; exosome biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We welcome your contributions to this Special Issue entitled “The Immunology and Biology of Brain Tumors”. Immunotherapy has become a viable treatment modality for a variety of cancers (and referred to as Science Magazine’s “Breakthrough of the Year” in 2013, as well as ASCO’s “Advance of the Year” in both 2016 and 2017). This Special Issue will focus on the relevance of immunobiology in brain tumors, touching on elements of immune suppression, immune stimulation, the immune microenvironment, with culminations in translational immunotherapy. Topics include, but are not limited to:

History of Brain Tumor Immunotherapy
Immune Checkpoints
Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors
Immune Suppression
            - by the tumor microenvironment
            - by tumor-release factors
            - in peripheral compartments
            - regulatory T cells
            - MDSCs
Immune Stimulation
Inflammation
Vaccines
            - DC-based
            - proteins
            - nucleic acids
            - cellular
            - nanomaterials
Immune Transfer
            - adoptive T cells
            - CAR-T cells
            - serologic
            - antibodies and constructs
Combination Therapies
Animal Models
Companion Animals

Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383; CODEN: JCMOHK) is an international, open access journal published monthly online by MDPI. It is indexed in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) in Web of Science and other databases. Citations become available in PubMed, with full-text archived in PubMed Central.

Prof. Michael Graner
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • History of Brain Tumor Immunotherapy
  • Immune Checkpoints
  • Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors
  • Immune Suppression
  • Immune Stimulation
  • Inflammation
  • Vaccines
  • Immune Transfer
  • Combination Therapies
  • Animal Models
  • Companion Animals

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Analysis of Tumor Angiogenesis and Immune Microenvironment in Non-Functional Pituitary Endocrine Tumors
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 695; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050695
Received: 15 April 2019 / Revised: 6 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
PDF Full-text (11011 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Cavernous sinus (CS) invasion is an aggressive behavior exhibited by pituitary neuroendocrine tumors (PitNETs). The cause of CS invasion in PitNETs has not been fully elucidated. The tumor immune microenvironment, known to promote aggressive behavior in various types of tumors, has not been [...] Read more.
Cavernous sinus (CS) invasion is an aggressive behavior exhibited by pituitary neuroendocrine tumors (PitNETs). The cause of CS invasion in PitNETs has not been fully elucidated. The tumor immune microenvironment, known to promote aggressive behavior in various types of tumors, has not been examined for PitNETs. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) signaling is strongly associated with the tumor immune microenvironment. In the present study, these molecular and histopathological characteristics were examined in invasive non-functional PitNETs (NF-PitNETs). Twenty-seven patients with newly diagnosed NF-PitNETs (with CS invasion: 17, without CS invasion: 10) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for VEGF-A/VEGFR1 and 2, hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF), tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, immunosuppressive cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and immune checkpoint molecules. Previously validated tumor proliferation markers including mitotic count, Ki-67 index, and p53 were also analyzed for their expressions in NF-PitNETs. VEGF-A and VEGFR1 were expressed on not only vascular endothelial cells, but also on tumor cells. The expressions of VEGF-A and VEGFR1 were significantly higher in NF-PitNETs with CS invasion. The number of TAMs and the expression of PD-L1 were also significantly higher in NF-PitNETs with CS invasion than in NF-PitNETs without CS invasion. The high expression of VEGF-A and VEGFR1 and associated immunosuppressive microenvironment were observed in NF-PitNETs with CS invasion, suggesting that a novel targeted therapy can be applied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Immunology and Biology of Brain Tumors)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Pilot Study of Vaccine Therapy with Multiple Glioma Oncoantigen/Glioma Angiogenesis-Associated Antigen Peptides for Patients with Recurrent/Progressive High-Grade Glioma
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(2), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020263
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 14 February 2019 / Published: 20 February 2019
PDF Full-text (1199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
High-grade gliomas (HGGs) carry a dismal prognosis despite current treatments. We previously confirmed the safety and immunogenicity of a vaccine treatment targeting tumor angiogenesis with synthetic peptides, for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) epitopes in recurrent HGG patients. In this study, we [...] Read more.
High-grade gliomas (HGGs) carry a dismal prognosis despite current treatments. We previously confirmed the safety and immunogenicity of a vaccine treatment targeting tumor angiogenesis with synthetic peptides, for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) epitopes in recurrent HGG patients. In this study, we evaluated a novel vaccine therapy targeting not only tumor vasculature but also tumor cells, using multiple glioma oncoantigen (GOA)/glioma angiogenesis-associated antigen (GAAA) peptides in HLA-A2402+ recurrent/progressive HGG patients. The vaccine included peptide epitopes from four GOAs (LY6K, DEPDC1, KIF20A, and FOXM1) and two GAAAs (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). Ten patients received subcutaneous vaccinations. The primary endpoint was the safety of the treatment. T-lymphocyte responses against GOA/GAAA epitopes and treatment response were evaluated secondarily. The treatment was well tolerated without any severe systemic adverse events. The vaccinations induced immunoreactivity to at least three vaccine-targeted GOA/GAAA in all six evaluable patients. The median overall survival time in all patients was 9.2 months. Five achieved progression-free status lasting at least six months. Two recurrent glioblastoma patients demonstrated stable disease. One patient with anaplastic oligoastrocytoma achieved complete response nine months after the vaccination. Taken together, this regimen was well tolerated and induced robust GOA/GAAA-specific T-lymphocyte responses in recurrent/progressive HGG patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Immunology and Biology of Brain Tumors)
Figures

Figure 1

J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top