Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Gastroenterology & Hepatopancreatobiliary Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2024 | Viewed by 429

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Physiology, Department of Immuno-Physiology e Pharmacology, Institute of the Biomedical Science Abel Salazar, (ICBAS), School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Center for Drug Discovery and Innovative Medicines (MedInUP), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: gatrointestinal motility; intestinal bowel disease; physical exercise; intestinal inflammation; enteric nervous system
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmacology and Neurobiology, Department of Immuno-Physiology e Pharmacology, Institute of the Biomedical Science Abel Salazar, (ICBAS), School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Center for Drug Discovery and Innovative Medicines (MedInUP), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
Interests: inflammatory bowel disease; purinergic system; ENS; clinical research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, with two main clinical manifestations: Crohn's disease, whose pathogenesis involves any part of the gastrointestinal tract, and ulcerative colitis, in which inflammation is limited to the colon. This gastrointestinal tract inflammation leads to symptoms such as bleeding, abdominal pain, diarrhea, malnutrition, and increased intestinal permeability. Among the factors involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases, genetics, dysregulation in the intestinal microbiota and environmental factors such as diet and physical inactivity stand out. Considering the severity of symptoms related to IBD, alternative therapies have been sought to alleviate intestinal discomfort, and physical exercise, dietary interventions, and nutritional supplements can bring benefits, which include improving the composition of the microbiota, intestinal tract, and its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action, which may have a protective action on the permeability in the gastrointestinal tract. This Research Topic aims to bring a collection of papers that approach the clinical diagnosis and treatment of IBD. We welcome the submission of manuscripts including, but not limited to, the following topics: Special focus will be given (but is not restricted) to clinical diagnosis of IBD; exercise or nutrition on IBD; microbiota and IBD; body composition on IBD.

Dr. Moisés Tolentino B. Da Silva
Dr. Isabel Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • gastrointestinal disorders
  • intestinal inflammation
  • intestinal bowel disease
  • nutrition
  • physical exercise
  • cancer
  • enteric nervous system
  • vagus nerve

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 13276 KiB  
Article
Specific Oral Manifestations in Adults with Crohn’s Disease
by Yavuz Cagir, Muhammed Bahaddin Durak, Cem Simsek and Ilhami Yuksel
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(13), 3955; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13133955 - 5 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Background: Oral manifestations of Crohn’s disease (CD) include non-specific lesions and specific lesions directly related to intestinal inflammation. Oral lesions that can be overlooked in CD are sometimes challenging to treat. Methods: In this retrospective single-center study, patients with CD aged [...] Read more.
Background: Oral manifestations of Crohn’s disease (CD) include non-specific lesions and specific lesions directly related to intestinal inflammation. Oral lesions that can be overlooked in CD are sometimes challenging to treat. Methods: In this retrospective single-center study, patients with CD aged over 18 years who complied with follow-up and treatment were included. Clinical definitions of specific oral lesions included pyostomatitis vegetans, glossitis with fissuring, lip swelling with fissuring, cobblestoning, and orofacial granulomatosis. Experienced dentists confirmed the specific lesions in each case. Three groups of patients were identified: those without oral lesions, those with non-specific oral lesions, and those with specific oral lesions. The groups were compared based on demographics, disease extent and behavior (based on the Montreal classification), extraintestinal involvement, biologic and steroid treatment, and the requirement of resective surgery. Results: A total of 96 patients (14.2%) with oral lesions were found among the 676 patients with CD (59.7% male, median age 38 years) who were followed for 6.83 years (IQR 0.5–29.87 years). Eight patients (1.2%, 9 lesions) had specific oral lesions, while eighty-eight patients (13%) had non-specific lesions. Orofacial granulomatosis (n = 3), cobblestoning (n = 2), glossitis with fissuring (n = 2), and lip swelling with fissuring (n = 2) were among the specific lesions. The majority of patients (75%) with specific lesions were male, and their median age was 46.5 years (range: 23–68 years). Disease localization was commonly ileocolonic (50%), and perianal disease was present in 25% of patients. Three patients were active smokers. Extraintestinal manifestations were peripheral arthritis/arthralgia (n = 7) and sacroiliitis (n = 1). All specific lesions were associated with moderate-to-severe disease. Five patients improved with biologic therapy, and two patients with immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions: Specific oral lesions in CD were associated with active disease and improved with immunomodulators or biologic therapy. Close cooperation between gastroenterologists and dentists is essential for early diagnosis and optimal management of CD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment)
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