Special Issue "Rehabilitation for Persistent Pain Across the Lifespan"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Anesthesiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jo Nijs

Department of Physiotherapy, Human Physiology and Anatomy, Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: chronic pain; central sensitization; lifestyle interventions; rehabilitation; exercise therapy
Guest Editor
Dr. Kelly Ickmans

Department of Physiotherapy, Human Physiology and Anatomy, Faculty of Physical Education and Physiotherapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: pediatric pain; chronic pain; central sensitization; rehabilitation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The area of rehabilitation research for patients having persistent pain is on the move. The rapid growth in pain science has inspired rehabilitation clinicians and researchers around the globe. This has led to breakthrough research and implementation of modern pain science in rehabilitation settings around the world. Still, our understanding of persistent pain continues to grow, not in the least because of fascinating discoveries from areas such as psychoneuroimmunology, exercise physiology, clinical psychology and nutritional (neuro)biology. This offers unique opportunities to further improve rehabilitation for patients with chronic pain across the lifespan. Also, the diversity of health care disciplines involved in the rehabilitation of chronic pain (e.g. physicians, psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurses, coaches) provides a framework for upgrading rehabilitation for chronic pain towards comprehensive lifestyle approaches.

The present Special Issue offers a unique opportunity to contribute to a state of the art series on the rehabilitation of chronic pain, including but not limited to the following major areas: musculoskeletal pain, pediatric pain, postsurgical pain, cancer pain, pain in athletes, and neuropathic pain. We are delighted with the initiative by Journal of Clinical Medicine to launch this Special Issue. Journal of Clinical Medicine’s 2017 ISI Web of Knowledge impact factor is 5.593; ranked 15 out of 154 journals (D1 journal), making it a top journal in the area of medicine (general & internal medicine). The issue will include 5 invited contributions from world-leading experts, who will develop a ‘Best Evidence Rehabilitation for Chronic Pain’ Series. In addition, we welcome submissions from all chronic pain experts – clinicians and researchers – around the world to submit their work for consideration in this Special Issue. Manuscript formats can vary from literature reviews (systematic literature reviews and meta analyses or narrative reviews) to original research (trials, cohort studies, experimental lab work, case-control studies), as long as they are of high quality and focussed on rehabilitation for patients having persistent pain.

Prof. Dr. Jo Nijs
Dr. Kelly Ickmans
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chronic Pain
  • Pain Neuroscience
  • Pediatric Pain
  • Cancer Pain
  • Musculoskeletal Pain
  • Pain in Athletes
  • Postsurgical Pain
  • Rehabilitation Medicine
  • Psychology
  • Physiotherapy
  • Lifestyle

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Adding Interferential Therapy Electro-Massage to Usual Care after Surgery in Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(2), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020175
Received: 13 January 2019 / Revised: 27 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
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Abstract
Subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) is a prevalent condition that results in loss of function. Surgery is indicated when pain and functional limitations persist after conservative measures, with scarce evidence about the most-appropriate post-operative approach. Interferential therapy (IFT), as a supplement to other interventions, [...] Read more.
Subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) is a prevalent condition that results in loss of function. Surgery is indicated when pain and functional limitations persist after conservative measures, with scarce evidence about the most-appropriate post-operative approach. Interferential therapy (IFT), as a supplement to other interventions, has shown to relieve musculoskeletal pain. The study aim was to investigate the effects of adding IFT electro-massage to usual care after surgery in adults with SAPS. A randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial was carried out. Fifty-six adults with SAPS, who underwent acromioplasty in the previous 12 weeks, were equally distributed into an IFT electro-massage group or a control group. All participants underwent a two-week intervention (three times per week). The control group received usual care (thermotherapy, therapeutic exercise, manual therapy, and ultrasound). For participants in the IFT electro-massage group, a 15-min IFT electro-massage was added to usual care in every session. Shoulder pain intensity was assessed with a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Secondary measures included upper limb functionality (Constant-Murley score), and pain-free passive range of movement. A blinded evaluator collected outcomes at baseline and after the last treatment session. The ANOVA revealed a significant group effect, for those who received IFT electro-massage, for improvements in pain intensity, upper limb function, and shoulder flexion, abduction, internal and external rotation (all, p < 0.01). There were no between-group differences for shoulder extension (p = 0.531) and adduction (p = 0.340). Adding IFT electro-massage to usual care, including manual therapy and exercises, revealed greater positive effects on pain, upper limb function, and mobility in adults with SAPS after acromioplasty. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation for Persistent Pain Across the Lifespan)
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Open AccessArticle Eye Gaze Markers Indicate Visual Attention to Threatening Images in Individuals with Chronic Back Pain
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8010031
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 18 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 31 December 2018
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Abstract
Research into attentional biases and threatening, pain-related information has primarily been investigated using reaction time as the dependent variable. This study aimed to extend previous research to provide a more in depth investigation of chronic back pain and individuals’ attention to emotional stimuli [...] Read more.
Research into attentional biases and threatening, pain-related information has primarily been investigated using reaction time as the dependent variable. This study aimed to extend previous research to provide a more in depth investigation of chronic back pain and individuals’ attention to emotional stimuli by recording eye movement behavior. Individuals with chronic back pain (n = 18) were recruited from a back rehabilitation program and age and sex matched against 17 non-symptomatic controls. Participants’ eye movements were recorded whilst they completed a dot probe task, which included back pain specific threatening images and neutral images. There were no significant differences between chronic pain and control participants in attentional biases recorded using reaction time from the dot probe task. Chronic pain participants, however, demonstrated a significantly higher percentage of fixations, larger pupil diameter, a longer average fixation duration and faster first fixation to threatening compared to neutral images. They also had a significantly longer average fixation duration and larger pupil diameter to threatening images compared to control participants. The findings of this study suggest eye gaze metrics may provide a more sensitive measure of attentional biases in chronic pain populations. These findings may have important therapeutic implications for the patient and therapist. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rehabilitation for Persistent Pain Across the Lifespan)
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Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title 1: Best-Evidence Rehabilitation for Chronic Pain Part 1: Pediatric Pain
Author: Laura E. Simons

Title 2: Best-Evidence Rehabilitation for Chronic Pain Part 2: Pain Following Cancer
Author: Ann De Groef

Title 3: Best-Evidence Rehabilitation for Chronic Pain Part 3: Low Back Pain
Author: Anneleen Malfliet

Title 4: Best-Evidence Rehabilitation for Chronic Pain Part 4: Neck Pain
Author: Michele Sterling

Title 5: Best-Evidence Rehabilitation for Chronic Pain Part 5: Osteoarthritis
Author: David Rice
J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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