Special Issue "Pain, Psychiatry and Addiction"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychiatry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 April 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Icro Maremmani
Website
Guest Editor
Vincent P. Dole Dual Disorder Unit, Department of Neurosciences, Santa Chiara University Hospital, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: clinical aspects and treatment of dual disorder patients; opioid use disorder; heroin use disorder; pain and addiction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Angelo G. I. Maremmani
Website
Co-Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychiatry, North-Western Tuscany Local Health Unit, Tuscany NHS, Versilia Zone, Viareggio, Italy, EU
2. PISA-School of Experimental and Clinical Psychiatry, Pisa, Italy, EU
Interests: clinical aspects and treatment of dual disorder patients; opioid use disorder; heroin use disorder; pain and addiction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Painful somatic symptoms are common in psychiatric patients, especially among depressed patients, and it is concerning when PSS are expressed in bipolar or in (sub)-threshold bipolar patients.

In many countries, the broad availability of prescription pain medications (PPMs) and prescription substitution medications (PSMs), coupled with public misconceptions about their safety and addictive potential, have contributed to the recent surge in the nonmedical use of prescription opioids (POs) and corresponding increases in treatment admissions for problems related to opioid misuse. Prescription opioid use disorder (POUD) is an established public health crisis in many countries, and current evidence indicates it is a growing problem in Europe. Many specialists play a role in these different kinds of painful manifestations, including pain, psychiatry, and addiction medicine specialists, especially in the diagnosis and management of POUD. Still, neither group can adequately address these patients’ needs alone. The purpose of this Special Issue of JCM was to bring together experts from pain, psychiatry, and addiction medicine to examine the positions of all three specialities in assessing and treating PSSs in psychiatric and/or in POUD patients with and without a dual disorder.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Painful somatic symptoms;
  • Pain and bipolar patients;
  • Pain and depressed patients;
  • Prescription substitution medications;
  • Prescription opioid for pain;
  • Pain prescription opioid use disorder;
  • Pain dual disorder patients;
  • Pain treatment in psychiatric patients;
  • Pain treatment in addiction patients;
  • Psychopathological symptoms and pain.

Prof. Dr. Icro Maremmani
Dr. Angelo G. I. Maremmani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pain
  • psychiatry
  • addiction medicine
  • psychopathological symptoms
  • prescription pain medications (PPMs) and prescription substitution medications (PSMs)
  • prescription opioids (POs)

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Co-Morbidity between Bipolar and Panic Disorder in Fibromyalgia Syndrome
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(11), 3619; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9113619 - 10 Nov 2020
Abstract
About half of the patients with fibromyalgia (FM) had a lifetime major depression episode and one third had a panic disorder (PD). Because the co-morbidity between bipolar disorder (BD) and PD marks a specific subtype of BD we aimed to investigate if co-morbid [...] Read more.
About half of the patients with fibromyalgia (FM) had a lifetime major depression episode and one third had a panic disorder (PD). Because the co-morbidity between bipolar disorder (BD) and PD marks a specific subtype of BD we aimed to investigate if co-morbid BD/PD (comBD/PD) occurs more frequently than the single disorder in FM patients and evaluate the clinical significance and timing of this co-morbidity. Further, we explored the role of co-morbid subthreshold BD and PD. In 118 patients with FM, lifetime threshold and sub-threshold mood disorders and PD were diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) Clinical Interview. Demographic and clinical variables were compared in co-morbid BD/PD (comBD/PD) and not co-morbid BD/PD (nocomBD/PD) subgroups. The co-morbidity BD/PD was seen in 46.6% of FM patients and in 68.6% when patients with minor bipolar (MinBD) and sub-threshold panic were included. These rates are higher than those of the general population and BD outpatients. There were no statistically significant differences between threshold and sub-threshold comBD/PD and nocom-BD/PD subgroups in demographic and clinical parameters. In the majority of patients (78.2%), the onset of comBD/PD preceded or was contemporary with FM. These findings support the hypothesis that comBD/PD is related to the development of FM in a subgroup of patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pain, Psychiatry and Addiction)
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