Melanoma: Clinical Updates and Perspectives

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 642

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Iuliu Hațieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj Napoca, Romania
Interests: melanoma; dermoscopy; dermato-oncology; adnexal disorders; dermato-surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Iuliu Hațieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj Napoca, Romania.
Interests: melanoma; dermoscopy; dermato-oncology; hair diseases; dermato-surgery; cutaneous lymphomas

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, major advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of melanoma, leading to an improvement in the overall survival rate of melanoma patients. Early and accurate diagnosis is crucial to improving clinical outcomes, as an early misdiagnosis can significantly reduce a patient’s chance of survival. The development of dermoscopy, confocal microscopy and other non-invasive techniques helps dermatologists diagnose early melanoma, although none of these techniques are 100% accurate. On the other hand, systems based on artificial intelligence (AI), particularly deep learning, are being increasingly studied, as the use of AI might lead to more precise and faster diagnoses.

Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of melanoma have enabled the identification of its implications in terms of clinical features and the development of therapy. Immune checkpoint therapy and targeted therapy have changed melanoma prognosis, although the ineffectiveness of therapeutic measures suggests that much remains to be understood about the mechanism of response and resistance to these drugs. Detecting molecular markers, such as genetic or immune alterations, has emerged as an innovative diagnostic and prognostic prediction method that guides therapeutic decisions.

The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight recent advances in the context of the diagnosis, treatment and prediction of the prognosis for melanoma.

Dr. Loredana Ungureanu
Dr. Simona C. Şenilǎ
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • melanoma
  • diagnosis
  • prognosis
  • therapy
  • perspectives

Published Papers (1 paper)

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15 pages, 312 KiB  
Review
Lentigo Maligna Treatment—An Update
by Loredana Ungureanu, Alina Florentina Vasilovici, Ioana Irina Trufin, Adina Patricia Apostu and Salomea-Ruth Halmágyi
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(9), 2527; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13092527 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 504
Abstract
Lentigo maligna (LM) is a melanoma in situ that is prevalent in chronically sun-damaged skin. Characterized by a slow growth pattern and high mutation rates due to chronic UV exposure, LM poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, particularly given its tendency to mimic other [...] Read more.
Lentigo maligna (LM) is a melanoma in situ that is prevalent in chronically sun-damaged skin. Characterized by a slow growth pattern and high mutation rates due to chronic UV exposure, LM poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, particularly given its tendency to mimic other skin lesions and its occurrence in cosmetically sensitive areas. Its diagnosis is based on an integrated approach using dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). Despite its slow progression, LM can evolve into lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM), making its treatment necessary. Treatment modalities encompass both surgical and non-surgical methods. Surgical treatments like Wide Local Excision (WLE) and Mohs Micrographic Surgery (MMS) aim for clear histological margins. WLE, a standard melanoma surgery, faces challenges from LM’s subclinical extensions, which increase the recurrence risk. MMS, effective for large or poorly defined lesions, is defined by precise margin control while considering cosmetic outcomes. Non-surgical options, including radiotherapy and imiquimod, are alternatives for non-surgical candidates. Radiotherapy has been effective since the 1950s, offering good control and cosmetic results, especially for older patients. Imiquimod, an immunomodulator, shows promise in treating LM, though its application remains off-label. The increasing incidence of LM/LMM necessitates a balance in treatment choices to minimize recurrence and maintain cosmetic integrity. A multidisciplinary approach, integrating clinical examination with dermoscopy and RCM and histological assessment, is essential for accurate diagnosis and effective LM management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melanoma: Clinical Updates and Perspectives)
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