Change in Cardiac Epidemiology in the New Millennium, Current and Future Trends

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology & Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2024 | Viewed by 3553

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Cardiology, The Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel
Interests: cardiac epidemiology; cardiac rhythmology; cardiac electrophysiology; arrhythmias

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Guest Editor
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Interests: research methodologies; epidemiology of cardiac diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of cardiology has considerably changed over the last few decades. Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiac disease, along with newer, better, and more accessible diagnostic abilities and advances in therapeutic modalities, have remarkably changed the diagnostic process and prognosis of cardiac conditions.

Despite the clinical advances in the field, the epidemiology of cardiac risk factors such as diabetes, obesity, lipid disorders, and hypertension has changed, as well with a direct effect on the epidemiology of cardiac diseases. Furthermore, the discovery of previously unknown risk factors, such as coronary calcium score and chronic inflammation, has made the prediction of cardiac disease more specific, bringing cardiac epidemiology closer to the single patient level.

Advances in novel data gathering and analysis that have made novel techniques available, such as big data and machine learning, have allowed us to ascertain new links between previously unconnected entities that have further changed the way we see cardiac epidemiology at the personal and population levels.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the recent changes in the epidemiology of cardiac disease, and to estimate further trends to help epidemiologist clinicians and policymakers.

Dr. Aviram Hochstadt
Dr. Tomer Ziv-Baran
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cardiac epidemiology
  • machine learning
  • big data
  • cardiac diseases
  • epidemiologic trends

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 391 KiB  
Article
Cardiovascular Risk Profile and Lipid Management in the Population-Based Cohort Study LATINO: 20 Years of Real-World Data
by Cristina Gavina, Daniel Seabra Carvalho, Marisa Pardal, Marta Afonso-Silva, Diana Grangeia, Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira, Francisco Araújo and Tiago Taveira-Gomes
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(22), 6825; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11226825 - 18 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3156
Abstract
The rising prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in Portugal has translated into more than 35,000 annual deaths due to CV diseases. We performed a multicenter observational cohort study encompassing clinical activities performed between 2000 and 2019 to characterize the CV risk profile [...] Read more.
The rising prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in Portugal has translated into more than 35,000 annual deaths due to CV diseases. We performed a multicenter observational cohort study encompassing clinical activities performed between 2000 and 2019 to characterize the CV risk profile and LDL-C management of patients in every CV risk category using electronic health records of a regional population in Portugal. We analyzed data from 14 health centers and 1 central hospital in the north of Portugal of patients between 40 and 80 years that had at least 1 family medicine appointment at these institutions. Living patients were characterized on 31 December 2019. CV risk assessment was computed according to the 2019 ESC/EAS Guidelines. Lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) and achievement of LDL-C targets were assessed. In total, the analysis included 78,459 patients. Patient proportions were 33%, 29%, 22%, and 17% for low, intermediate, high, and very high CV risk, respectively. Moderate-intensity statins were the most frequently used medication across all CV risk categories. High-intensity statins were used in 5% and 10% of high and very high CV risk patients, respectively. Ezetimibe was used in 6% and 10% of high and very high CV risk patients, respectively. LDL-C targets were achieved in 44%, 27%, 7%, and 3% of low, intermediate, high, and very high CV risk patients, respectively. For uncontrolled patients in the high and very high CV risk categories, a median LDL-C reduction of 44% and 53%, respectively, would be required to meet LDL-C targets. There are clear opportunities to optimize LDL-C management in routine clinical practice. The prescription of LLT according to CV risk represents an important missed treatment opportunity. Full article
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