Special Issue "Clinical Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "General Surgery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 23 May 2023 | Viewed by 1518

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Conzo
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Guest Editor
Department of Traslational Medical Sciences, Division of General, Mininvasive, Oncologic and Bariatric Surgery University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: thyroid cancer; thyroidectomy; complications; neck dissection; local relapse; differentiated; neuromonitoring vocal folds; palsy
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Dr. Renato Patrone
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. PhD ICTH, University of Federico II of Naples, 80131 Napoli, Italy
2. Hepatobiliary Surgical Oncology Division, Istituto Nazionale Tumori-IRCCS-Fondazione G. Pascale, Via Mariano Semmola, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: thyroid cancer; endocrine surgery; thyroid surgery; oncological surgery; pancreatic surgery; pancreatic cancer, HPB surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ludovico Docimo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of General, Mininvasive, Oncologic and Bariatric Surgery, Department of Advanced Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: bariatric surgery; general surgery; colorectal surgery; oncological surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is for us a great honor to present this Special Issue of JCM: “Clinical Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery”.

This monograph is meant to provide an overview of current principles and future directions in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in general, gastrointestinal (GI) and endocrine surgery.

More and more papers in the literature have considered the issue and investigated novel technologies, but the debate is still open.

This Special Issue will publish articles written by expert Italian surgeons, members of the Italian Society of Digestive System Pathologies (SIPAD), the Neapolitan Society of Surgery (SnAC) and the United Italian Society of Endocrine Surgery (SIUEC) with a deep knowledge in this field.

Their work will be an inspiration for future research.

This Special Issue will be published on behalf of these three important Italian scientific societies (SIPAD, SnAC and SIUEC), and we wish to thank their boards.

Special thanks go to Dr. Emmanuel Andrès and Prof. Dr. Michael G. Hennerici, Editors-in-Chief of JCM, for allowing the publication of this Special Issue, and to Amy Lu for the editorial assistance.

In recent years, MIS reached a large diffusion worldwide for the treatment of benign and malignant diseases, especially in GI and endocrine pathologies, demonstrating safety and feasibility.

MIS has provided indisputable benefits over traditional approaches in a large number of surgical operations, with similar operative time and cost. Rapid recovery is very useful for patients in comparison to the large skin incisions with a long hospital stay and complex post-operative mobilization that are typical of open surgery.

The incidence of gastrointestinal and endocrine neoplasms remains high, and the scientific literature shows an increasing interest in this topic, with a mounting article production.

Evolutions of surgical technique, the growth of team expertise, the support of data from the literature, and necessity for hospitals to increase patient turnover have allowed minimally invasive approaches to have an increasingly predominant role in general, GI and endocrine surgery.

The ERAS program and its diffusion have given a further boost.

In this Special Issue, we aim to deepen and explore new surgical techniques to improve minimally invasive surgery, its applications in the treatment of gastrointestinal and endocrine cancers, investigate the outcomes and hospital implications, the role of robotic surgery, future perspectives, and finally cost analysis.

We will also evaluate MIS oncological outcomes.

Limitations of MIS, such as reduced maneuverability, loss of depth perception and sometimes longer operative time are also considered.

Finally, an accurate literature review will offer readers the more recent international trends and evidence in general gastrointestinal and endocrine surgery, current limitations and future directions.

Thanks to expert opinions, we have summarized more common MIS operative techniques and evaluated the evidenced advances.

Special thanks go to the authors who collaborated to drafting this Special Issue, and to the Board Members of SIPAD, SIUEC, and SnAC who accepted our invitation.

In conclusion, we wish to express our gratitude to the reviewers that allowed the publication of this Issue with their support.

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Conzo
Dr. Renato Patrone
Prof. Dr. Ludovico Docimo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • MIS
  • laparoscopic surgery
  • advanced surgical technique
  • oncological surgery
  • general surgery
  • endocrine surgery
  • gastrointestinal surgery

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Is There Indication for the Use of Biological Mesh in Cancer Patients?
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(20), 6035; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11206035 - 13 Oct 2022
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Abstract
Up to 28% of all patients who undergo open surgery will develop a ventral hernia (VH) in the post-operative period. VH surgery is a debated topic in the literature, especially in oncological patients due to complex management. We searched in the surgical database [...] Read more.
Up to 28% of all patients who undergo open surgery will develop a ventral hernia (VH) in the post-operative period. VH surgery is a debated topic in the literature, especially in oncological patients due to complex management. We searched in the surgical database of the Hepatobiliary Unit of the National Cancer Institute of Naples “G. Pascale Foundation” for all patients who underwent abdominal surgery for malignancy from January 2010 to December 2018. Our surgical approach and our choice of mesh for VH repair was planned case-by-case. We selected 57 patients that fulfilled our inclusion criteria, and we divided them into two groups: biological versus synthetic prosthesis. Anterior component separation was used in 31 patients (54.4%) vs. bridging procedure in 26 (45.6%). In 41 cases (71.9%), we used a biological mesh while a synthetic one was adopted in the remaining patients. Of our patients, 57% were male (33 male vs. 24 female) with a median age of 65 and a mean BMI of 30.8. We collected ventral hernia defects from 35 cm2 to 600 cm2 (mean 205.2 cm2); 30-day complications were present in 24 patients (42.1%), no 30-day mortality was reported, and 21 patients had a recurrence of pathology during study follow-up. This study confirms VH recurrence risk is not related with the type of mesh but is strongly related with BMI and type of surgery also in oncological patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery)
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Systematic Review
Predictive Factors for Anastomotic Leakage after Laparoscopic and Open Total Gastrectomy: A Systematic Review
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(17), 5022; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11175022 - 26 Aug 2022
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Abstract
The aim of this systematic review is to identify patient-related, perioperative and technical risk factors for esophago-jejunal anastomotic leakage (EJAL) in patients undergoing total gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC). A comprehensive literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases was performed. Studies providing [...] Read more.
The aim of this systematic review is to identify patient-related, perioperative and technical risk factors for esophago-jejunal anastomotic leakage (EJAL) in patients undergoing total gastrectomy for gastric cancer (GC). A comprehensive literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases was performed. Studies providing factors predictive of EJAL by uni- and multivariate analysis or an estimate of association between EJAL and related risk factors were included. All studies were assessed for methodological quality, and a narrative synthesis of the results was performed. A total of 16 studies were included in the systematic review, with a total of 42,489 patients who underwent gastrectomy with esophago-jejunal anastomosis. Age, BMI, impaired respiratory function, prognostic nutritional index (PNI), alcohol consumption, chronic renal failure, diabetes and mixed-type histology were identified as patient-related risk factors for EJAL at multivariate analysis. Likewise, among operative factors, laparoscopic approach, anastomosis type, additional organ resection, blood loss, intraoperative time and surgeon experience were found to be predictive factors for the development of EJAL. In clinical setting, we are able to identify several risk factors for EJAL. This can improve the recognition of higher-risk patients and their outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Advances in Minimally Invasive Surgery)
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