Clinical Therapeutic Advances in Urological Cancer

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 8 July 2024 | Viewed by 2415

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Via Rita Levi Montalcini 4, Pieve Emanuele, 20090 Milan, Italy
Interests: urological cancer; active surveillance; biomarkers; intravesical therapy; bladder-sparing treatment; prognostic factors; oncological outcomes

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Guest Editor
Department of Urology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: oncological urology; bladder cancer; bladder cancer imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to introduce this Special Issue, “Clinical Therapeutic Advances in Urological Cancer”, aimed at disseminating the latest research in the field of urological cancer treatment. Urological cancers, including prostate, urothelial, kidney, penile, and testicular cancer, represent a significant global health challenge. The primary objectives of this Special Issue are to assess the current status of research in this field, address core problems in urological cancer therapy, and provide a platform for innovative solutions.

This Special Issue’s scope encompasses a wide range of topics, such as novel treatment modalities, biomarker development, personalized medicine, immunotherapy, and advances in surgical techniques. We invite contributions focused on improving early detection, improving treatment efficacy, minimizing side effects, and ultimately enhancing the quality of life of urological cancer patients.

We encourage researchers, clinicians, and experts in the field to mobilize their knowledge and experience to advance the clinical therapeutic landscape of urological cancers. Together, we can drive progress in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of urological cancers, ultimately improving patient outcomes.

We look forward to your valuable contributions to this Special Issue.

Dr. Roberto Contieri
Dr. Laura S. Mertens
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urological cancer
  • biomarker development
  • personalized medicine
  • immunotherapy
  • surgical techniques
  • screening
  • treatment efficacy
  • quality of life
  • patient outcomes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 619 KiB  
Article
Variation in Follow-Up after Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer—An Inventory Roundtable and Literature Review
by Roberto Contieri, Renate Pichler, Francesco del Giudice, Gautier Marcq, Andrea Gallioli, Simone Albisinni, Francesco Soria, David d’Andrea, Wojciech Krajewski, Diego M. Carrion, Andrea Mari, Bas W. G. van Rhijn, Marco Moschini, Benjamin Pradere and Laura S. Mertens
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(9), 2637; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13092637 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 676
Abstract
Background: Follow-up after radical cystectomy (RC) for bladder cancer can be divided into oncological and functional surveillance. It remains unclear how follow-up after RC should ideally be scheduled. The aim of this report was to gain insight into the organization of follow-up after [...] Read more.
Background: Follow-up after radical cystectomy (RC) for bladder cancer can be divided into oncological and functional surveillance. It remains unclear how follow-up after RC should ideally be scheduled. The aim of this report was to gain insight into the organization of follow-up after RC in Europe, for which we conducted a roundtable inventory within the EAU Young Academic Urologists Urothelial Cancer working group. Methods: An inventory semi-structured survey was performed among urologists of the EAU Young Academic Urologists Urothelial Cancer working group to describe the organization of follow-up. The surveys were analyzed using a deductive approach. Similarities and differences in follow-up after RC for bladder cancer were described. Results: The survey included 11 urologists from six different European countries. An institutional follow-up scheme was used by six (55%); three (27%) used a national or international guideline, and two (18%) indicated that there was no defined follow-up scheme. Major divergent aspects included the time points of follow-up, the frequency, and the end of follow-up. Six centers (55%) adopted a risk-adapted follow-up approach tailored to (varying) patient and tumor characteristics. Laboratory tests and CT scans were used in all cases; however, the intensity and frequency varied. Functional follow-up overlapped with oncological follow-up in terms of frequency and duration. Patient-reported outcome measures were only used by two (18%) urologists. Conclusions: Substantial variability exists across European centers regarding the follow-up after RC for bladder cancer. This highlights the need for an international analysis focusing on its organization and content as well as on opportunities to improve patients’ needs during follow-up after RC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Therapeutic Advances in Urological Cancer)
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7 pages, 6655 KiB  
Communication
Treating BCG-Induced Cystitis with Combined Chondroitin and Hyaluronic Acid Instillations in Bladder Cancer
by Renate Pichler, Johannes Stäblein, Andrea Mari, Luca Afferi, David D’Andrea, Gautier Marcq, Francesco del Giudice, Francesco Soria, Jorge Caño-Velasco, José Daniel Subiela, Andrea Gallioli, Karl H. Tully, Keiichiro Mori, Achim Herms, Benjamin Pradere, Marco Moschini, Laura S. Mertens and Martin Thurnher
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(7), 2031; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13072031 - 31 Mar 2024
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Abstract
In non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) responders benefit from strong Th1-type inflammatory and T cell responses mediating tumor rejection. However, the corresponding lack of anti-inflammatory Th2-type immunity impairs tissue repair in the bladder wall and facilitates the development of cystitis, causing [...] Read more.
In non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) responders benefit from strong Th1-type inflammatory and T cell responses mediating tumor rejection. However, the corresponding lack of anti-inflammatory Th2-type immunity impairs tissue repair in the bladder wall and facilitates the development of cystitis, causing urinary pain, urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Mechanistically, the leakage of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) layer enables an influx of potassium ions, bacteria, and urine solutes towards the underlying bladder tissue, promoting chronic inflammation. Treatments directed towards re-establishing this mucopolysaccharide-based protective barrier are urgently needed. We discuss the pathomechanisms, as well as the therapeutic rationale of how chondroitin and hyaluronic acid instillations can reduce or prevent BCG-induced irritative bladder symptoms. Moreover, we present a case series of five patients with refractory BCG-induced cystitis successfully treated with combined chondroitin and hyaluronic acid instillations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Therapeutic Advances in Urological Cancer)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Current advancements in the management of testicular germ cell tumors
Authors: Khalid Y. Alkhatib, MD, MMSc; Phillip M. Pierorazio, MD
Affiliation: Division of Urology, University of Pennsylvania
Abstract: /

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