Clinical Advances in Spinal Cord Injury

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 854

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
Interests: neck pain; cervical spine disorders; diagnosis; management; spine surgery; total disc replacement (TDR); novel rehabilitation strategy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, there has been a significant transformation in treatment approaches for spinal cord injury (SCI). The application of regenerative medicine and/or novel drugs to SCI in clinics had been reported by various experts. The effectiveness of early decompression surgery is becoming increasingly apparent and more widespread. Additionally, several new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for SCI have been reported, including the application of AI as a prognostic prediction method, novel imaging modalities and innovative rehabilitation tools showing potential effectiveness to promote functional recovery in SCI patients.

In this Special Issue, we aim to summarize these recent advancements and try to provide insights into prospects and directions to move in.

Dr. Masao Koda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • spinal cord injury
  • decompression surgery
  • fusion surgery
  • regenerative medicine

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1202 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis on Nutritional Status, Neurological Outcome, and Perioperative Complications in Patients with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury
by Tomoaki Shimizu, Kota Suda, Satoko Matsumoto Harmon, Miki Komatsu, Masahiro Ota, Hiroki Ushirozako, Akio Minami, Masahiko Takahata, Norimasa Iwasaki, Hiroshi Takahashi and Masashi Yamazaki
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(17), 5714; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12175714 - 01 Sep 2023
Viewed by 678
Abstract
This retrospective study aimed to investigate the characteristics of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries (CSCI) with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). We included 153 consecutive patients with CSCI who underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery. The patients were divided into two groups [...] Read more.
This retrospective study aimed to investigate the characteristics of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries (CSCI) with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). We included 153 consecutive patients with CSCI who underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of DISH. Patient characteristics, neurological status on admission, nutritional status, perioperative laboratory variables, complications, neurological outcomes at discharge, and medical costs were compared between the groups. The DISH group (n = 24) had significantly older patients (72.1 vs. 65.9, p = 0.036), more patients with low-impact trauma (62.5% vs. 34.1%, p = 0.009), and a lower preoperative prognostic nutritional index on admission (39.8 vs. 42.5, p = 0.014) than the non-DISH group (n =129). Patients with DISH had significantly higher rates of ventilator management (16.7% vs. 3.1%, p = 0.022) and pneumonia (29.2% vs. 8.5%, p = 0.010). There was no significant difference in medical costs and neurological outcomes on discharge. Patients with CSCI and DISH were older, had poor nutritional status, and were prone to postoperative respiratory complications, while no differences were found between the neurological outcomes of patients with CSCI with and without DISH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Advances in Spinal Cord Injury)
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