Special Issue "Water Infrastructure Asset Management"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019) | Viewed by 24101

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Assela Pathirana
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor of Integrated Urban Water Cycle Management, Flood Resilience Research Group, Department of Water Science and Engineering, IHE-Delft Institute for Water Education, Westvest 7, 2611AX Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: urban water cycle management; climate change adaptation; rainfall; urban drainage and flood; infrastructure asset management
Mr. Frank Den Heijer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Project manager flood risk, expert consultant division of flood risk, Deltares, Boussinesqweg 1, 2629 HV Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: flood risk management; probabilistic design in hydraulic engineering; hydraulics of deltas; asset management of flood infrastructure; reservoir management; water defence structures
Dr. Eur Ing. Paul B Sayers
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Sayers and Partners LLP, Watlington, UK
2. University of Oxford Honorary Fellow, Oxford, UK
Interests: strategic flood risk management; flood defence planning; design; management; nature-based approaches; flood social and economic vulnerability; coastal erosion; climate risk and resilience
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many civil infrastructure systems have water-related functions: Flood defence, marine infrastructures, irrigation, drinking water, sewage, etc. Considerable investments are required for building, renovating and maintaining these systems. Most influence (positively or negatively) other associated systems, serve multiple functions and are often operated by more than one owner/manager. This tapestry of type, function and ownership present a complex challenge to life cycle asset management.

In recent decades, these complex challenges have motivated the development of more strategic, whole life and multi-disciplinary approaches to guide the design, maintenance and planning of water infrastructure assets. Across these asset types engineers and designers face similar issues and this special issue focuses on the latest developments in managing water-related infrastructure systems, including (but not limited to), buried pipe (drinking/sewer water) systems, dikes and dunes, storm surge barriers, bridge pillars, locks, sluices, retaining walls, harbour infrastructures, reservoirs and dams, irrigation systems, etc.

We invite submissions from across water infrastructure asset management, that address key challenges of (i) How to appropriately reconfigure existing assets and design new assets in a way that makes future adaptation easy. (ii) How best to ensure infrastructure assets delivery multiple life-time outcomes for society and the environment. (iii) How to work embrace the contribution of natural infrastructure alongside conventional infrastructure.

We encourage you to consider the opportunity for water infrastructure asset managers in addressing these challenges and welcome papers that aspects a broad range of topics, including:

  1. Data management: Asset inventories, innovation data collation methods and uncertainty handling, data value
  2. Asset condition assessment and deterioration modelling
  3. Asset failure modes and reliability analysis.
  4. Risk-based planning and optimisation of renewal programming.
  5. Asset adaptation and life cycle management (managing uncertainty, climate change, funding, changing demands and requirements, scenario analysis, societal cost benefit approaches, system optimization and planning);
  6. Life time extension approaches: repair and renovation techniques, design, probabilistic modelling and maintenance optimization.
  7. Software tools for addressing different aspects of asset management (e.g., optimization, life-cycle costing)
  8. Innovations in (Higher) Education and training in AM for water infrastructure.

Dr. Assela Pathirana
Mr. Frank den Heijer
Mr. Paul Sayers
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Article
Maturity Improvements in Flood Protection Asset Management across the North Sea Region
Infrastructures 2020, 5(12), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5120112 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1041
Abstract
North Sea Region countries depend heavily on flood protection infrastructure, such as dikes, dams, sluices and flood gates. Knowledge on where, when and how much to invest to ensure functioning is of crucial importance for asset owners and operators. This requires asset management [...] Read more.
North Sea Region countries depend heavily on flood protection infrastructure, such as dikes, dams, sluices and flood gates. Knowledge on where, when and how much to invest to ensure functioning is of crucial importance for asset owners and operators. This requires asset management approaches that are adaptable, respond to feedback and function within various contexts. The FAIR (Flood defense infrastructure Asset management & Investment in Renovation, adaptation, optimisation and maintenance) project has developed a unique framework to ensure that asset management processes are adaptive, comprehensive and make effective connections across strategic, tactical and operational contexts. The framework has for the first time informed an assessment of maturity of five flood protection asset management organisations in the North Sea Region, using a seven-factor maturity assessment model. This paper describes the self-assessment process and the self-reported maturity changes during the project. Maturity assessments were undertaken on two occasions, at the start of the project, and again toward the end. This has revealed how the baseline level of maturity for each organisation developed over the course of the three-year project. The observed maturity changes indicate that adopting the FAIR framework has added value in improving current approaches to asset management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Adaptive Asset Management for Flood Protection: The FAIR Framework in Action
Infrastructures 2020, 5(12), 109; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5120109 - 03 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1393
Abstract
Uncertainties about climate change consequences, changing societal requirements and system complexity require flood protection asset managers to continuously evaluate their asset management policies and practice to manage risk and improve the resilience of their assets. However, there are many challenges in doing this, [...] Read more.
Uncertainties about climate change consequences, changing societal requirements and system complexity require flood protection asset managers to continuously evaluate their asset management policies and practice to manage risk and improve the resilience of their assets. However, there are many challenges in doing this, with asset operators often facing conflicting interests and major uncertainties about the future needs for asset performance. In the EU Interreg IV FAIR project, flood protection asset owners and operators, with scientific partners from the North Sea Region of Europe collaborated to develop practical guidance for adaptive asset management of flood protection infrastructure. The central component of this guidance is the FAIR framework, presented here. The framework combines insights and principles from ISO 55000 on asset management and ISO 14090 on climate adaptation with asset operator experiences to provide a practical guide for integration of asset management considerations within both strategic and operational contexts via a tactical handshake. This is a means to avoid the common lack of connection between strategic plans and operational practice. The applicability of the framework is illustrated with examples from Pilot Cases within the FAIR project, in which its value in terms of improved asset management and reduced costs has been demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Value of Information of Structural Health Monitoring in Asset Management of Flood Defences
Infrastructures 2019, 4(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4030056 - 30 Aug 2019
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3328
Abstract
One of the most rapidly emerging measures in infrastructure asset management is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), which aims at reducing uncertainty in structural performance by using monitoring equipment. As earthen flood defence structures typically have large strength uncertainties, such techniques can be particularly [...] Read more.
One of the most rapidly emerging measures in infrastructure asset management is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), which aims at reducing uncertainty in structural performance by using monitoring equipment. As earthen flood defence structures typically have large strength uncertainties, such techniques can be particularly promising. However, insight in the key characteristics for successful SHM for flood defences is lacking, which hampers the practical implementation. In this study, we explore the benefits of pore pressure monitoring, one of the most promising SHM techniques for earthen flood defences. The approach is based on a Bayesian pre-posterior analysis, and results are evaluated based on the Value of Information (VoI) obtained from different monitoring strategies. We specifically investigate the effect on long-term reinforcement decisions. The results show that, next to the relative magnitude of reducible uncertainty, the combination of the probability of having a useful observation and the duration of a SHM effort determine the VoI. As it is likely that increasing loads due to climate change will result in more frequent future reinforcements, the influence of scenarios of different rates of increase in future loads is also investigated. It was found that, in all considered possible scenarios, monitoring yields a positive Value of Information, hence it is an economically efficient measure for flood defence asset management both now and in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
A Failure Risk-Based Culvert Renewal Prioritization Framework
Infrastructures 2019, 4(3), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4030043 - 15 Jul 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3842
Abstract
Transportation agencies are currently challenged to keep up with culvert infrastructure that is rapidly deteriorating due to lack of adequate maintenance and capital improvement. It is imperative for the transportation agencies to identify and rehabilitate deteriorated culverts prior to their failures. Among several [...] Read more.
Transportation agencies are currently challenged to keep up with culvert infrastructure that is rapidly deteriorating due to lack of adequate maintenance and capital improvement. It is imperative for the transportation agencies to identify and rehabilitate deteriorated culverts prior to their failures. Among several concerns, lack of rational rehabilitation prioritization tools is foremost. Complicating this need further, current practices vary widely across the state departments of transportation (DOTs) which makes it difficult to develop a universal approach for prioritizing failing culverts. This paper presents and demonstrates a failure risk-based culvert prioritization approach that is compliant with the inspection procedures of the South Carolina DOT. The approach presented in this paper is specifically developed for reinforced concrete pipe (RCP) and corrugated metal pipe (CMP) materials because of their wide popularity. Outcomes from a survey of state DOTs informed the development of parametric weightings using the principles of analytical hierarchy process (AHP). Weightings developed for several critical inspection parameters are combined with the corresponding condition assessment scores to determine the failure criticality of culverts, which are subsequently combined with estimated failure consequences to determine failure risk estimates. The prioritization approach is demonstrated using the condition assessment scores of over 5200 culvert structures in South Carolina. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Urban Drainage Networks Rehabilitation Using Multi-Objective Model and Search Space Reduction Methodology
Infrastructures 2019, 4(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4020035 - 08 Jun 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3593
Abstract
The drainage network always needs to adapt to environmental and climatic conditions to provide best quality services. Rehabilitation combining pipes substitution and storm tanks installation appears to be a good solution to overcome this problem. Unfortunately, the calculation time of such a rehabilitation [...] Read more.
The drainage network always needs to adapt to environmental and climatic conditions to provide best quality services. Rehabilitation combining pipes substitution and storm tanks installation appears to be a good solution to overcome this problem. Unfortunately, the calculation time of such a rehabilitation scenario is too elevated for single-objective and multi-objective optimization. In this study, a methodology composed by search space reduction methodology whose purpose is to decrease the number of decision variables of the problem to solve and a multi-objective optimization whose purpose is to optimize the rehabilitation process and represent Pareto fronts as the result of urban drainage networks optimization is proposed. A comparison between different model results for multi-objective optimization is made. To obtain these results, Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is first connected to a Pseudo Genetic Algorithm (PGA) for the search space reduction and then to a Non-Dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II) for multi-objective optimization. Pareto fronts are designed for investment costs instead of flood damage costs. The methodology is applied to a real network in the city of Medellin in Colombia. The results show that search space reduction methodology provides models with a considerably reduced number of decision variables. The multi-objective optimization shows that the models’ results used after the search space reduction obtain better outcomes than in the complete model in terms of calculation time and optimality of the solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Fit-for-Purpose Infrastructure Asset Management Framework for Water Utilities Facing High Uncertainties
Infrastructures 2018, 3(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures3040055 - 04 Dec 2018
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4666
Abstract
Traditional infrastructure asset management is about maintaining the status quo of service levels in a resource-restricted, sometimes risk-increasing environment. Infrastructure asset management (IAM) is effective in addressing resource-deprived situations and in maximizing the benefits of the utility in these contexts. This makes IAM [...] Read more.
Traditional infrastructure asset management is about maintaining the status quo of service levels in a resource-restricted, sometimes risk-increasing environment. Infrastructure asset management (IAM) is effective in addressing resource-deprived situations and in maximizing the benefits of the utility in these contexts. This makes IAM a very appropriate and useful approach for developing countries. Hence, this paper focuses on developing a fit-for-purpose integrated asset management (IAM) framework that is suitable for situations where there are risks to assets, significant uncertainties, and resource deficits, and where improvements to the current service levels are needed. To be comprehensive in the application in these contexts, there is a need to supplement IAM with a new perspective—critical necessities, next to the risks to the status quo (current levels of service). This gap was evident during application of IAM principles to the drinking water system of Al-Mafraq, Jordan. It was overcome by framing questions on adaptation deficits and future needs that are to be answered together with risk matrix-based prioritization of asset management actions. The fit-for-purpose IAM framework comprising asset management, adaptation deficit, and future needs can ensure the continuity of service levels in emerging cities when supported through expert inputs and stakeholder consultations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Review
Sewer Pipes Condition Prediction Models: A State-of-the-Art Review
Infrastructures 2019, 4(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4040064 - 22 Oct 2019
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4647
Abstract
Wastewater infrastructure systems deteriorate over time due to a combination of aging, physical, and chemical factors, among others. Failure of these critical structures cause social, environmental, and economic impacts. To avoid such problems, infrastructure condition assessment methodologies are developing to maintain sewer pipe [...] Read more.
Wastewater infrastructure systems deteriorate over time due to a combination of aging, physical, and chemical factors, among others. Failure of these critical structures cause social, environmental, and economic impacts. To avoid such problems, infrastructure condition assessment methodologies are developing to maintain sewer pipe network at desired condition. However, currently utility managers and other authorities have challenges when addressing appropriate intervals for inspection of sewer pipelines. Frequent inspection of sewer network is not cost-effective due to limited time and high cost of assessment technologies and large inventory of pipes. Therefore, it would be more beneficial to first predict critical sewers most likely to fail and then perform inspection to maximize rehabilitation or renewal projects. Sewer condition prediction models are developed to provide a framework to forecast future condition of pipes and to schedule inspection frequencies. The objective of this study is to present a state-of-the-art review on progress acquired over years in development of statistical condition prediction models for sewer pipes. Published papers for prediction models over a period from 2001 through 2019 are identified. The literature review suggests that deterioration models are capable to predict future condition of sewer pipes and they can be used in industry to improve the inspection timeline and maintenance planning. A comparison between logistic regression models, Markov Chain models, and linear regression models are provided in this paper. Artificial intelligence techniques can further improve higher accuracy and reduce uncertainty in current condition prediction models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Perspective
Water Infrastructure Asset Management Is Evolving
Infrastructures 2021, 6(6), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6060090 - 18 Jun 2021
Viewed by 961
Abstract
Infrastructure Asset Management (IAM) is the process by which decisions are made and resources allocated to ensure organisational or societal assets continue to deliver, as required. IAM is an evolving field. We discuss this evolution and present our perspectives on the future direction [...] Read more.
Infrastructure Asset Management (IAM) is the process by which decisions are made and resources allocated to ensure organisational or societal assets continue to deliver, as required. IAM is an evolving field. We discuss this evolution and present our perspectives on the future direction of IAM. IAM was born as a response to the poor state of maintenance of infrastructure, largely due to lack of resources, and emphasizes the need to prioritize maintenance and renewal using risk-based approaches. The demands on IAM have also continued to evolve as asset systems have become more complex, with multifunctionality, adaptative capacity and nature-based infrastructure, all issues that IAM must now consider. These challenges underpin the changing context of Water Infrastructure Asset Management (WIAM) and the opportunity for WIAM to harness new technical developments from other IAM domains. WIAM will need to continue to evolve, responding to these challenges and take advantage of these opportunities through research and application in collaboration with a relevant education and capacity development agenda. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Infrastructure Asset Management)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop